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CBS

CBS News is the news division of television network CBS, a division of CBS Corp. Jeff Fager is the chairman of the division and is also the executive producer of “60 Minutes.” David Rhodes is the president of CBS News. Other programs include “CBS This Morning,” the “CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley,” CBS News “Sunday Morning,” “Face the Nation with Bob Schieffer” and “48 Hours.”

Pelley: Part of Steve Capus’ Job is to ‘Help Us Get Up to Number Two, and on to Number One’

SteveCapus1Variety‘s Brian Steinberg speaks to “CBS Evening News” anchor Scott Pelley and Executive Producer Steve Capus about propelling the third-place CBS broadcast up the ratings ranks. Last week, the program saw the most younger viewer growth among the evening newscasts.

At one time, Capus oversaw – among many other things – the nation’s most-watched evening newscast, NBC’s “Nightly News” with Brian Williams, as president of NBC News between 2005 and 2013. . Now he has come aboard CBS News as an executive editor, as well as the new overseer of the evening newscast. His new mission? He wants to boost “Evening News” out of its third-place roost, without abandoning CBS’ old-school reliance on in-depth reporting, despite a competitor, ABC, that has made strides by featuring a faster-paced program. Part of Capus’ job “is to help us get up to number two, and on to number one,” says Scott Pelley, the anchor and managing editor of the broadcast, in an interview held in his office in the “CBS Evening News” studio.

And Capus says the program will succeed without gimmicks.

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Network Coverage Plans for President Obama’s ISIS Address

ObamaCNNIsisBroadcast and cable news networks will provide special coverage tomorrow night at 9pmET for President Obama’s speech on American action against ISIS.

Here is what the networks are planning:

  • CBS’ Bob Schieffer will anchor for the network with “CBS Evening News” anchor Scott Pelley reporting from Iraq, where it will be 4am. The CBS Sports special “Under the Lights” will be delayed.
  • Brian Williams anchors for NBC with Chuck Todd reporting from the DC Bureau, delaying “America’s Got Talent” in the eastern and central time zones.
  • ABC’s chief anchor George Stephanopoulos hosts, along with Jonathan Karl at the White House.
  • Shepard Smith will anchor a special report on FOX, interrupting the season premiere of “Hell’s Kitchen.”
  • On Fox News,  Megyn Kelly will anchor with Bret Baier appearing. “The O’Reilly Factor” will air at 8pmET and “Hannity” at 10pmET will be live, with a special live edition of “Special Report” airing at 11pmET.
  • On CNN, Anderson Cooper and Wolf Blitzer will anchor.
  • John Seigenthaler will anchor a preview of the speech at 8:30pmET for Al Jazeera America as well as coverage of the actual speech. White House Correspondent Mike Viqueira will contribute from the White House.
  • Neil Cavuto will anchor  for Fox Business Network, followed by live editions of “Lou Dobbs Tonight” at 10pmET and “The Independents” at 11pmET.
  •  MSNBC will air a two-hour primetime special hosted by Rachel Maddow from 8pm-10pmET. Chris Matthews, Chris Hayes, Andrea Mitchell and Reverend Al Sharpton will join Maddow. “The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell” will air at 10pmET followed by a live “All In with Chris Hayes” at 11pmET.
  • Bloomberg Politics’s Mark Halperin and John Heilemann will anchor Bloomberg TV’s special primetime coverage of the President’s speech starting at 9PM ET from Washington, DC. Bloomberg’s Al Hunt will contribute reporting and analysis.
  • CNBC will carry the address with hosts as yet unannounced

Bruce Morton Has Died

brucemortonBruce Morton, former CBS News and CNN correspondent, died at his home in Washington, DC this morning after a battle with cancer. Morton, a Harvard graduate and U.S. Army Veteran, joined ABC News in 1962. He left for CBS News two years later where he would stay for 29 years. For most of that time, Morton was a congressional correspondent, but also anchored the “CBS Morning News” from 1974 to 1977. After leaving CBS in 1993, Morton went to work for CNN as national correspondent. He retired in 2006.

Morton is survived by his son Alec and daughter Sarah, who also worked in TV news. Sarah Morton spent 18 years at CBS News as a producer. Bruce Morton was 83.

More: CNN Washington Bureau Chief Sam Feist sent a note to staff about Morton’s passing: “Bruce was an original member of the famed ‘Boys on the Bus,’ and could share campaign trail war stories with his colleagues and our viewers like nobody else.”

More: CBS’s obituary on Morton, also after the jump…

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‘So Long Suckers’

WBZ reporter Chris McKinnon reported for “CBS This Morning” on a great white shark attack off Plymouth, MA. Turns out McKinnon just joined the Boston station, and just as Charlie Rose and Gayle King welcomed him to the CBS family, this happened:

Where Are They Now? Ken Kashiwahara

KKashiwaharaToday, TVNewser begins a multi-week series where we’ll catch up with some tvnewsers of yesterday to learn about their lives now, and their perspectives on the industry.  We start with former ABC newsman Ken Kashiwahara.  Next week: former CNN anchor Bobbie Battista.

Ken Kashiwahara most certainly has used up some of his nine lives.

Take his harrowing escape from South Vietnam while on assignment for ABC News in 1975. “It was anarchy, chaos,” he tells TVNewser about the fall of Saigon.

Kashiwahara was trapped in a mob of humanity trying to flee the country via helicopter at the U.S. Embassy.  He knew he had to scale the compound’s wall to safety.

“U.S. Marines were on top of the wall, pulling people up,” he recalls.  Kashiwahara was one of the lucky ones literally lifted up and over.

The story is just one of many experienced during a quarter-century with the network.  Another moment had Kashiwahara showered with shrapnel while covering the Lebanese Civil War.

“In the very beginning,” he says about his 25-year tenure with ABC, spent as a correspondent and as a Hong Kong and San Francisco bureau chief, “it was very exciting, the travel and not knowing where you were going to be from one day to the next.

“But after a while it got a little tiring. You could never plan your life.”

And so in 1998, at the age of 58, Kashiwahara retired.

It all began in 1969 when, after a stint in the Air Force, Kashiwahara got his big break in journalism in his native Hawaii, at Honolulu’s KHVH radio.  The station’s news director “took a chance on me.  I mean, I was terrible!”

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Holly Williams: Being a Woman in a War Zone ‘Can Sometimes Be an Advantage’

holly williams in iraqCBS News foreign correspondent Holly Williams, who has been reporting this week from northern Iraq, talks to FORTUNE about the advantages of being a woman in a war zone:

Sometimes when you travel to more conservative parts of the Middle East, obviously you are going to get treated differently as a woman than as a man. I have never felt it is a disadvantage. If anything, it can sometimes be an advantage to be a foreign woman in this part of the world because people are disarmed by it. There is such a culture of hospitality in this part of the world and people often feel sympathetic to you as a woman so they go out of their way to help you. They are less suspicious of you because you are a woman. When you are in the more conservative places, as a foreigner, you have access to both the men and the women. As a male corespondent, you can only talk to the men.

CBS Eyes October Launch of Digital Channel

CBSEyesCBS News is in hiring mode for the new CBS News digital news channel and is looking at a launch in October, TVNewser has learned.

The channel is being championed by CBS Corp. CEO Les Moonves, with CBS News president David Rhodes heading up the effort. Rhodes is a veteran of the cable game, having worked the early years at Fox News Channel and later as head of U.S. TV for Bloomberg.

We’re told Mosheh Oinounou, who worked with Rhodes at both Fox News and Bloomberg and Nancy Lane, head of editorial for CBSNews.com, are doing most of the candidate interviews. Lane is also a cable news veteran, having worked at CNN for 29 years. Oinounou has been with CBS since 2011. CBS is looking to have a staff of around 60 people for the launch, including interactive, technical and editorial, many plucked from current cable TV news ranks.

In May, Moonves told Bloomberg’s Trish Regan, “Wouldn’t it be a good idea to do a 24-hour digital channel taking all the resources that CBS News has…all over the world. And there is so much information that we get every day that doesn’t fit into a 22-minute newscast at 6:30, or ‘CBS This Morning.’ So we can do that.”

Longtime CBS News Political Editor Dotty Lynch Dies

Dotty Lynch AU SOCDotty Lynch, a polling pioneer who served as CBS News political editor from 1985 to 2005, died yesterday after a yearlong battle with cancer. “Dotty was a rare combination of book smart, street smart, and incredibly funny,” deputy Washington bureau chief Ward Sloane wrote in a memo to staff today:

She led us through some remarkable times and elections. I like to think that Dotty was digital before digital was cool – she re-created and formatted The CBS News Campaign Directory in 1992. Those of you who had one will never forget it. It was a pocket sized book that had every phone number of every official any political reporter or producer could want. It was the envy of the road, many reported outright theft by competitors or being begged for a copy.

She also had an eye for talent – that rare ability to see not just what a person could offer today, but also to see what they could become. Here are a few examples of the researchers Dotty hired: FACE THE NATION Executive Producer Mary Hager and FACE THE NATION Senior Producer Rob Hendin, both were also CBS EVENING NEWS White House producers; Steve Chaggaris, who ran political coverage in 2008 and now edits CBSNews.com in Washington and Kia Baskerville, who is a special events producer and talent scout.

Sloane’s full note is after the jump. Read more

The Story Behind the Ice Bucket Challenge

Matt Lauer has done it, so has Shepard Smith and Rachel Maddow. NBC’s Dylan Dryer did it late last week, then on Saturday challenged her “Today” colleagues Erika Hill, Lester Holt and Jenna Wolfe. They accepted. So where did the ice bucket challenge start? “CBS This Morning” had the back-story this morning. And, naturally, led to a challenge for Charlie Rose, Norah O’Donnell and fill-in host Jane Pauley. Rose and O’Donnell accepted the challenge. Pauley asked, “Can I just write a check?” WATCH:

‘CBS Sunday Morning’ Looks to Continue Ratings Growth As Jane Pauley Fills in

Pauley304Jane Pauley takes the reins of “CBS Sunday Morning” tomorrow for the first time as host. The former “Today” show co-anchor will fill in for Charles Osgood, and she’ll also sit in for Gayle King on “CBS This Morning” all next week. Pauley, who spent 13 years at the “Today” show, signed on as a contributor for CBS News in April.

Pauley hosts “Sunday Morning” as the show comes off another big win. Last Sunday, “CSM” averaged 5.19 million viewers — more than the averages for “Good Morning America,” “Today,” and “CBS This Morning’s” for the Monday thru Friday editions in July. That’s up +11% vs. the same week last year. The show drew 1.2 million A25-54 viewers, flat vs. last year.

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