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Posts Tagged ‘Brit Hume’

Did Media Coverage of Controversial Arizona Bill Help Lead to Veto?

BrewerBillAll three cable news networks carried Arizona Governor Jan Brewer‘s press conference last night announcing her veto of a controversial bill that would allow businesses’ and people to refuse service to LGBT people based on religious beliefs.

After the announcement, Anderson Cooper replayed parts of an interview he did the night before with one of the bill’s sponsor, Arizona State Senator Nancy Barto.

Cooper asked her six separate times if she could name one example that had already happened where people of faith had been forced to do something against their religious beliefs.  “I can raise a hypothetical,” Barto said, citing a hypothetical same sex marriage where a photographer who didn’t want to provide service wouldn’t have protection.

Governor Brewer, shown above vetoing the bill, had similar phrasing to Cooper during her announcement: “I have not heard of one example in Arizona where business owners religious liberty has been violated.”

Fox News broke into “On the Record” with Shepard Smith reporting on the press conference. “I think Governor Brewer did the right thing,” New Hampshire Senator Kelly Ayotte told Greta Van Susteren when FNC whipped back to “On the Record.”  Megyn Kelly led “The Kelly File” interviewing Family Research Council President Tony Perkins on the news out of Arizona. On Tuesday night, Kelly and Brit Hume wondered whether the bill was an “overreaction” by religious conservatives.

Over on MSNBC, Chris Hayes took over for Chris Matthews coming out of the press conference at 7:51pmET, still during “Hardball.” Hayes spoke with the Arizona Democratic Minority Leader Anna Tovar via phone on her reaction to the veto. Rachel Maddow led her show with news of the veto, covering the other states who are considering similar bills to Arizona. Lawrence O’Donnell noted the media’s impact on forcing a veto: “They got away with it until we focused on it…we the national media.” Read more

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The Tale of Bret Baier’s Wrinkled Pants

Bret Baier, who celebrated his fifth anniversary as the anchor of Fox News’ “Special Report” on Monday, talked with Real Clear Politics this week about the milestone. He recalls a very funny story about viewer reaction to his wrinkled pants after he made his debut:

Baier also talked about the moment he learned he had been picked to succeed Brit Hume: Read more

Bret Baier Marks 5 Years as Anchor of ‘Special Report’

bret baierBret Baier will celebrate his fifth anniversary as anchor of “Special Report” tonight. Baier began at Fox as the network’s Atlanta bureau chief in 1998, running the operation out of his garage with a fax machine and a cell phone. He took over for Brit Hume as anchor of “Special Report” when Hume transitioned into his current role as the network’s senior political analyst in 2009.

It has already been a big year for Baier: he was recently elected to the Gridiron Club, the oldest association of journalists in Washington. He also plans to write his first book, Special Heart: A Journey of Faith, Courage and Love, this year. The book will detail his experience with his six year old son Paul, who suffers from a rare heart condition. Baier will donate his author proceeds from the book to pediatric heart research.

“Special Report” consistently ranks in the top five cable news programs, finishing 2013 fourth in total viewers and fifth in the A25-54 demographic. Baier’s team has put together a look back at his five years in the anchor chair, which will air tonight.

How Did Fox News Become Fox News?

FoxNewsLogoBill Hemmer will take a look at Fox News’ history for a special airing tonight at 10pmET.

“Fox News: Our Story” features interviews with Brit Hume, Sean Hannity and Shepard Smith, who recalls he initially didn’t think the channel could succeed: “Not a chance, no way, no how. And what that shows is that I didn’t know the boss,” Smith says. “I can remember [Roger Ailes] telling me distinctly, we will win … I love what Roger and our folks have accomplished. I’m very proud of it.”

Watch a preview at Fox News Insider.

The Ticker: Krauthammer, CNN Scenes, ‘Katie’

  • Politico profiles Fox News’ Charles Krauthammer: “While he intellectually operates at a very high level, he speaks simply and clearly and compellingly,” Brit Hume says of Krauthammer. “You don’t have to be a genius to know what he’s talking about.”

  • CNN.com has launched a new gallery of correspondents’ photos from behind the news reports. “Scenes From the Field” will be refreshed regularly and produced by the network’s Atlanta-based International Desk.

  • Katie Couric‘s talk show has launched a weeklong “Challenge For Change” this week. Correspondent Cameron Hughes will travel to Denver, Detroit, New York, Phoenix and Washington, D.C. to spotlight local charities making a difference in those cities.

The Ticker: Farrow, Will, Edson

  • “My feeling . . . is that there’s a frustration in how passive the experience of receiving news can be,” Ronan Farrow tells Page Six about his new MSNBC show. “I think that the time is right to step in with a show that’s all about giving you, the average Joe at home, the tool set on how you can get involved.”

  • FBN Washington correspondent Rich Edson is running the Marine Corps Marathon this weekend in Washington, D.C. “I’m getting anxious and I’m getting nervous,” the first-time marathoner told The Washington Post. “I want to train more. I want to go out [running] more. But fortunately, I’m working quite a lot.”

In 17 Years, FNC Has Made 5 Evening Changes; CNN and MSNBC Have Made 75

For those of you keeping score at home: this is just the fifth time in 17 years that Fox News has made changes to primetime. By comparison, CNN and MSNBC have changed their line-up a total of 75 times since 1997. CNN has made 31 changes in that time while MSNBC has made 44 changes. Fox News went on the air Oct. 7, 1996 a few months after MSNBC. Here are FNC’s evening changes since:

  • January 1998 — “Crier Report” moved to 10pm (replacing “Cavuto Business Report” which moved to 5pm, then 4pm). “O’Reilly Report” (6p) became “O’Reilly Factor” and moved to 8pm. “Special Report with Brit Hume” launched at 6pm
  • September 1999 — “Fox Report with Paula Zahn” moves from 7pm to 10pm and is renamed “Edge with Paula Zahn.”
  • January 2002 – Greta Van Susteren joins from CNN and takes over Zahn’s spot at 10pm. Zahn had jumped to CNN a few months earlier.
  • January 2009 — “Hannity & Colmes” loses Colmes, but “Hannity” remains in the 9pm timeslot

DOJ Also Targeted Fox News Reporter James Rosen

The Washington Post goes into great detail looking into how the Department of Justice investigates leaks by targeting journalists, by revealing that the DOJ targeted Fox News correspondent James Rosen following a report back in 2009.

The AP made waves last week after it was revealed that the DOJ targeted the personal and professional phone lines of hundreds of journalists in an apparent attempt to determine who leaked information.

Rosen’s case is a bit different, because he was targeted specifically and because he was identified as possibly breaking the law, nonetheless, the actions of the DOJ do have a chilling effect on journalists across all media organizations. Even Glenn Greenwald, hardly a fan of Fox News (or U.S. TV news generally), called the move “dangerous.

PM Update: Fox News executive VP of news editorial Michael Clemente has released a statement with regard to Rosen.

More: Brit Hume appeared on FNC to talk about the incident. Video after the jump.

In the exchange, Rosen used the alias “Leo” to address Kim and called himself “Alex,” an apparent reference to Alexander Butterfield, the man best known for running the secret recording system in the Nixon White House, according to the affidavit.

Rosen instructed Kim to send him coded signals on his Google account, according to a quote from his e-mail in the affidavit: “One asterisk means to contact them, or that previously suggested plans for communication are to proceed as agreed; two asterisks means the opposite…

Read more

Bret Baier: 50 Months Leading The Pack, But Still Shaking Things Up

Leading up to the 2012 election, Fox News Channel’s “Special Report with Bret Baier” was one of the must-see programs for politics junkies. Baier himself was tapped to co-anchor the channel’s election coverage alongside Megyn Kelly.

The election may be over, but “Special Report” continues to generate strong viewership, averaging nearly two million viewers per day. This month, the program will mark 50 months at number one in cable news at 6 PM.

Without an election to preview, the political stories Baier and his team cover have been varied, but there is an underlying theme that Baier says is exemplified by his show’s coverage of policy like sequestration.

“I think that is where our bread and butter is, taking something that is complicated, and making it easier to understand,” Baier tells TVNewser. “Not talking down to the folks who really understand this stuff, but also making sure that everybody gets it.”

The program also looks outside the beltway for stories that are not in its political wheelhouse, but that people are talking about, like the Manti T’eo Hoax story.

“That is not a story that normally fits with special report, but we did it,” Baier says. “We are letting the news drive the show, we are not letting a strict formula of politics-centric do it.”

“Special Report” has changed a bit since Baier took over for Brit Hume in 2009.

Read more

Retiring ‘Fox News Sunday’ EP Marty Ryan On The Evolution Of Fox News

On Sunday, “Fox News Sunday” executive producer Marty Ryan oversaw his last edition of the public affairs program. Ryan, a former senior producer and executive producer of NBC’s “Today,” and a longtime senior member of Fox News Channel”s DC leadership, is retiring from the channel. 

“Maybe they will call me back at some point and ask if this old guy wants to do something else,” he quips.

Ryan helped launch the Sunday public affairs show in 1996, before Fox News Channel even officially launched.

“I was telling our staff, when I first walked into our bureau here, there really was nothing,” Ryan says. “There was no chairs, no lamps, tables dangling from ceilings from when the prior tenant had left the facility, so we literally had to build—from scratch—a world class network news bureau.

“Where we were a startup before, we are now a mature news organization, but we still have the mindset of a startup, which I think is good and makes us healthy,” he added.

At “Today,” Ryan worked closely with household names like Bryant Gumbel, Jane Pauley and Tom Brokaw. When asked about some of the more memorable events that he has covered in his career, a major event across the pond came to mind.

Read more

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