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Posts Tagged ‘Glenn Greenwald’

Megyn Kelly is ‘Not Ideological,’ Won’t Be Fed ‘Incoherent Tripe’

megyn kelly kelly file 5Politico profiles “red hot” Megyn Kelly and takes the temperature of both personal supporters of Kelly’s and vehement detractors of Fox News.

  • First Look Media’s Glenn Greenwald: “She has a lower tolerance for being fed incoherent tripe from her own side than the average cable news TV host.”
  • Fmr. Fox News contributor Jane Hall: “She clearly often has a point of view, but somehow she manages to show independence and be seen as someone who is not ideological and hitting the same talking points that you see on some of the other prime-time shows.”
  • MSNBC host Chris Matthews: “I think [the Rove incident] was the first big sign, at least to me, that she was going to be a journalist… that she was going to use journalistic standard in covering the election. I think that struck a lot of people.”
  • WJLA General Manager Bill Lord: “I think she’s tried to stay — as best you can in the Fox environment — pretty much in the middle of the political spectrum.”
  • The Loudest Voice in the Room author Gabe Sherman: “I think she wants to maintain her credibility so that when Roger [Ailes] is out of the picture at Fox, she could jump to CNN or another network. She doesn’t want to get marginalized as right wing.”

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S.E. Cupp: ‘Discipline Was Necessary’ for NBC’s Ayman Mohyeldin, CNN’s Diana Magnay

CuppWhile guest hosting on “The View” this morning, S.E. Cupp chimed in on last week’s temporary removal of NBC’s Ayman Mohyeldin and complete removal of her CNN colleague, Diana Magnay, from Gaza.

“Even reporters get into problems when they discuss this conflict,” Cupp said, pointing to social media posts both Mohyeldin and Magnay penned while covering the conflict. “You’re a reporter, and your job–no matter how passionate you are about this issue, everyone has strong feelings–your job is to be objective. Discipline was necessary.”

It should be noted, in the case of Mohyeldin, NBC never publicly acknowledged disciplinary reasons as the catalyst for pulling the veteran foreign correspondent from Gaza (following widespread pushback, the network reversed its decision and sent Mohyeldin back to Gaza over the weekend). Last Thursday, Glenn Greenwald reported Mohyeldin had been pulled by executives for security reasons. That report came a day after we reported some NBC staffers were angered by the network’s decision to have Richard Engel report for “Nightly News” Wednesday night on the Gaza port airstrike that killed four children since Mohyeldin witnessed the strike and reported on it throughout the day.

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Glenn Greenwald: People Say Fox News’ Obama Criticism Puts Soldiers ‘in Danger’

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During an interview this afternoon on the NSA revelations leaked by Edward Snowden last year, Shepard Smith and Glenn Greenwald got into a tense exchange over how Fox News’ coverage of President Obama impacts U.S. soldiers.

“Do you spend any time worrying that people might have died in this?” Smith asked Greenwald.

“No, that’s like saying, ‘do you worry that your last broadcast caused the death of people,” Greenwald responded, adding that Smith would ask for specifics about how his show caused deaths.

“We don’t know when CIA people die,” Smith countered, noting that deaths that might happen as a result of the Snowden revelations might never be revealed. “I’ve heard people say all the time that Fox News puts men and women in war in danger by criticizing President Obama,” Greenwald shot back. “Careful,” Smith responded.

“C’mon, did MSNBC do that…” Smith asked without finishing the sentence, presumably referencing MSNBC’s coverage of President George W. Bush during the Iraq War.

“That’s my point…I would want to hear evidence before I believed any of those kinds of accusations about other journalists,” Greenwald concluded.

WATCH:

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Snowden: ‘The Minute You Start Talking to a Journalist, There is No Going Back From That’

WilliamsGreenwaldSnowdenEdward Snowden said the “point of no return” in his quest to reveal NSA surveillance programs, was when it came time to tell journalists what he knew.

“It was a really intimidating moment,” Snowden told Brian Williams about meeting Glenn Greenwald, who sat for that part of the interview with Williams in Moscow last week. “It was the most real point of no return because the minute you start talking to a journalist as an intelligence officer on camera, there is really no going back from that,” Snowden said.

Snowden says he has an agreement with Greenwald, and other journalists for whom he is a source. “I demanded that they agreed to consult with the government to make sure no individuals or specific harms could be caused by any of that reporting.”

Williams said that includes NBC News, which has done its own reporting based on Snowden’s documents. Williams also revealed that NBC has a “reporting relationship” with Greenwald, which explains how the Williams interview was helped along, and is interesting given Greenwald’s past with another NBC Newser.

Williams closed the hour by teasing that Greenwald’s next story based on the Snowden documents “may be the biggest yet in terms of impact.”

Brian Williams Interviews Edward Snowden

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“NBC Nightly News” anchor Brian Williams traveled to Moscow this week for an exclusive interview with Edward Snowden. It’s the former NSA contractor’s first-ever American television interview and it will air as an hour-long NBC News primetime special next Wednesday.

Williams, who anchored Monday’s “Nightly News,” before leaving for Moscow, talked with Snowden for several hours, NBC News says. Snowden, a U.S. Citizen, with a revoked passport, has been living in exile for nearly a year, since leaking classified documents about U.S. surveillance programs to Glenn Greenwald, for the Guardian, and Barton Gellman, of the Washington Post. Those reports won a Pulitzer Prize last month.

Lester Holt, filling in for Brian Williams on Tuesday’s “Nightly News,” said Williams would be back for Wednesday’s show. When he wasn’t — Holt filled in again — that got us wondering where Williams was. Now we know.

And after that 11,000-mile 72-hour trip, Williams turned around and got on a flight to Nashville to honor a commitment to speak at tonight’s Hillwood High School graduation. Williams will anchor “Nightly News” from Nashville.

Glenn Greenwald Disappointed There Won’t be a Sequel Interview With David Gregory

Much to Glenn Greenwald‘s dismay, there won’t be a sequel to last year’s lively exchange between him and David Gregory on this Sunday’s “Meet the Press.”

“That was really disappointing,” Greenwald told HuffPost Live today about Gregory not being the one interviewing him about his new book for Sunday’s “Meet the Press” (Pete Williams interviewed Greenwald instead).

Greenwald added he was looking forward to seeing if Gregory’s views might have changed since their last interview; in that exchange last June, Gregory asked Greenwald why he shouldn’t be charged criminally for aiding and abetting Edward Snowden. Greenwald responded it was extraordinary for Gregory to muse about other journalists’ arrests without evidence.

NBC News sources tell TVNewser Gregory not doing the interview with Greenwald, which was pre-taped today in New York City, was due to logistics, as Fridays are a busy day of show preparation for Gregory in Washington, DC.

The Sunday Ticker: Singing, Spying, Winning

  • “CBS Sunday Morning” goes behind-the-scenes with some Billboard chart-topping nuns. The sisters of the Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles in Missouri only speak for one hour a day, but they sing for five and have become rock stars in the classical music world.

  • Glenn Greenwald gives his first post-Pulitzer Prize winning interview to CNN’s Brian Stelter on “Reliable Sources” this morning. Stelter also interviews Aereo CEO Chet Kanojia, just days before the streaming TV service goes before the Supreme Court.

  • Friday’s “20/20″ on ABC was the top broadcast program in the A18-49 demo. With 8.1 million viewers, the show had its 2nd-highest ratings of the season. “20/20″ is tracking for its most-watched season in 4 years – since the 2009-10 season.

Robin Roberts, Rachel Maddow, Anderson Cooper on the OUT Power 50

OUT50Several TV news anchors and hosts have made this year’s OUT Power 50 list. It’s the brand’s annual ranking of the most influential LGBT voices in American culture. ABC’s Robin Roberts, who publicly came out late last year, is the first woman of color in the top 10. Here are some TV notables:

35. Suze Orman
27. Don Lemon
14. Anderson Cooper
10. Robin Roberts
3. Rachel Maddow

Ellen DeGeneres, who was number 2 last year, returned to the top spot on the list. Also on the list Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Glenn Greenwald at #5, Bravo’s Andy Cohen at #8, and Gawker CEO Nick Denton at #45.

(Image via OUT)

Edward Snowden Reporting Wins Pulitzer Prize For Washington Post, Guardian

The Washington Post and the U.S. edition of the Guardian have won the top award in journalism — the Pulitzer Prize. They will share the Public Service award for their series of stories on NSA surveillance, as revealed by Edward Snowden, an NSA contractor who gave the top-secret information to the news organizations. The Pulitzer committee said the journalism was “marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security.”

Barton Gellman led the Post’s coverage, while Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras and Ewen MacAskill led the Guardian’s coverage.

KurtzSnowdenGreenwald became the public face of the reporting, appearing on two Sunday shows last June 9 just hours before the Guardian posted a video interview with Snowden detailing NSA tactics. As an international chase began for Snowden — he eventually made it to Moscow, where he remains — Greenwald kept up his U.S. TV news appearances, often from Rio de Janeiro where he lives, including on “Meet the Press” where journalism itself, became the topic of debate. Greenwald and Poitras returned to the U.S. last Friday, to accept a Polk Award, also for their Snowden reporting.

Data, Data Everywhere

DataImage

Data. It’s all the rage these days: good rage and bad rage.

Some are packaging it nicely into new data-driven sites, like FiveThirtyEight and Vox.com to help us better understand the news.

Others are making money off of data — your data — data brokers, they’re called. (Here’s “60 Minutes” reporting on them earlier this month).

Then there are overreaching intelligence agencies, whose collected data, later leaked, led to an international incident, followed by the creation of even more new Websites, most notably The Intercept from Glenn Greenwald.

Data can help us. Data can hurt us. For people who work in news, all this data and the changing nature of privacy impacts how you do your jobs. We’ll be talking about all this next month at the TVNewser Show, April 29 in New York City. Among the guests is Trevor Timm, the co-founder of the Freedom of the Press Foundation, which is dedicated to transparency and accountability in government.

Click here for more information and to register.

(Image: Shutterstock)

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