TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Mark Hoffman’

Suze Orman Leaving CNBC

suze-orman-306Suze Orman will be moving on from CNBC after 14 years.

CNBC President Mark Hoffman notified staffers this morning, through an internal memo, that Orman will be making a big announcement in the near future. The announcement will detail plans to leave her Saturday night CNBC slot, for a weekday syndicated show.

The last new episode of “The Suze Orman Show” will air March 28. Check out the entire memo that Hoffman sent out after the jump.

> Update: Telepictures has announced it will produce “Suze Orman’s Money Wars,” with a launch date not yet announced. Release after the jump…

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!
 

CNBC’s ‘Next 25′ Gala Brings Out Finance Stars

In celebration of the network’s 25th anniversary, last night, CNBC hosted “The Next 25” Gala at Jazz at Lincoln Center in NYC. Attendees included: Mickey Drexler, Martha Stewart, Jeffrey Bewkes, Barry Diller, Mellody Hobson and George Lucas, Sir Martin Sorrell, Jack Welch, Bob Wright, Regis Philbin, as well as CNBC talent and executives, to name a few.

(Photos by: Virginia Sherwood/CNBC)

A CNBC Original Steps Aside

ScottCohnScott Cohn, who was on of the original CNBC employees, is leaving full-time work with the business channel, and moving to Santa Cruz, CA where his wife will expand her business in the education field. Cohn will continue to contribute to the network.

In a memo from CNBC president Mark Hoffman, as first reported by Talking Biz News, Cohn joined CNBC on March 20, 1989, a month before the network launched, as part of the original NY/NJ reporting team. In 1990, Cohn opened the Chicago Bureau, where he would stay for 9 years, before returning to headquarters.

He has covered most of the biggest business and general news stories of the past 25 years—from Enron and WorldCom to Hurricane Katrina and the Boston Marathon bombings. He has interviewed the famous and infamous, from Warren Buffett (his first live interview on CNBC in 1998) to Bernie Madoff. His documentaries have showcased the best of CNBC’s reporting.

In a couple of weeks, Scott will leave CNBC to make his journey West. In addition to some teaching and trying his hand at producing documentaries, he will become a special correspondent for CNBC, continuing to spearhead the annual Top States extravaganza.

Please join us in wishing Scott all the very best in his new adventure.

Closing Bell Rings Live from CNBC

CNBCClosingBell

In celebration of CNBC’s 25th anniversary, the closing bell of the New York Stock exchange was rung from across the Hudson River at CNBC headquarters in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. CNBC President Mark Hoffman, NBCUniversal News Group Chairman Pat Fili-Krushel and hundreds of CNBC employees were on hand for the bell ringing.

‘The Kudlow Report’ Cancelled, Larry Kudlow Becomes CNBC Senior Contributor

Environmental Portrait of Larry Kudlow, CEO, Kudlow & CompanyLarry Kudlow, who has been a part of CNBC for its 25-year history, is scaling back at the network. His 7pmET show “The Kudlow Report” will end its run at the end of the month, TVNewser has learned. Kudlow will stay on as a senior contributor to CNBC’s Business Day programs.

“The Kudlow Report” has been on CNBC since January, 2009. From 2005-2008, he hosted “Kudlow & Company,” and earlier in the decade he was part of “Kudlow & Cramer,” alongside Jim Cramer.

“In my career, I have encountered few television hosts with Larry’s range,” writes CNBC president Mark Hoffman in a note to staff, obtained by TVNewser. “As an interviewer, he is unfailingly polite and energetic, skillfully grilling guests but always ending a segment graciously. Larry has always brought great enthusiasm to every program and appearance.”

Hoffman says the network is working on “a new 7PM strategy.”

Maria Bartiromo Signs Off: ‘After 20+ Amazing Years I Will Be Moving on to My Next Chapter’

Maria BartiromoIt was a record finish for Maria Bartiromo at CNBC. On a day the DJIA and S&P 500 hit new heights, Bartiromo said so long to CNBC.

“I won’t give you a long and mushy goodbye especially since I’ve been getting choked up all day,” Bartiromo said at the end of “Closing Bell.” “But I still must extend my love and thank you to many, as this is my last broadcast on CNBC.”

“Thank you to all of the early building blocks, Bob Wright, Tom Rogers, Jack Welch among others. Thank you Mark Hoffman, I wish you and your team success.”

Bartiromo has anchored “Closing Bell” for the last 11 years, but first gained fame as the “Money Honey” while reporting from the floor of the NYSE.

“I have been incredibly privileged to hold this seat the last two decades,” she said. “While I feel like CNBC is one family, my other family is on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.”

Though it hasn’t been officially announced, Bartiromo is moving to Fox Business Network where she will anchor a daily show for FBN as well as a Sunday morning show for Fox News.

Business Insider breaks down the “why” behind Bartiromo’s departure, which was first reported by the Drudge Report on Monday. It came down to three things: money, visibility and opportunity.

Kelly Evans will join Bill Griffeth starting Monday on the 3pm hour of “Closing Bell,” then Evans will go on to anchor the 4pm hour with an ensemble of other CNBC reporters on an interim basis.

Bartiromo’s final “On the Money,” the syndicated show which was known as “Wall Street Journal Report” until CNBC’s deal with WSJ ended, airs this weekend. Becky Quick will take over that show but CNBC will likely work in other hosts as well.

Bartiromo’s full goodbye, after the jump…

Read more

The Ticker: MSNBC, FNC, CNBC

  • Ed Schultz‘s “The Ed Show” returns to MSNBC Saturday, May 11 at 5pmET. Airing Saturdays and Sundays, the show will debut as a one-hour program expanding to two hours this summer. “Ed” moved off weeknights last month.

  • CNBC president Mark Hoffman and his boss Pat Fili-Krushel are making executive moves. CNBC International president Satpal Brainch moves to Universal Networks Intl. as EVP. He’ll be replaced by current NBCU News Group CFO KC Sullivan. Both will be based in London.

Inside CNBC Prime, CNBC’s New Primetime Entertainment Block

The stars of CNBC Prime’s “Car Chasers”

Tonight at 9 PM, CNBC will launch its new primetime entertainment block, CNBC Prime. In a stark departure from CNBC’s daytime programming, Tuesday evenings will become dedicated to unscripted reality shows, albeit with a business twist.

“At first I looked at shows that I thought would be organic to CNBC, ‘could I do shows set in the Wall Street space?’ I instantly felt that it might be tough, because it isn’t that visual,” Jim Ackerman, senior VP of primetime alternative programming tells TVNewser. “I came across a pitch about these guys that are flipping cars, and I thought that what these guys do is very much akin to what a commodity broker does, but their commodity happens to be very visual, that commodity has a back-story, that commodity has an emotional impact on the people buying and selling it, and I thought, this could work for us.”

That show is “Car Chasers,” which will kick off the Prime block tonight alongside “Treasure Detectives.” CNBC plans to launch eight or nine series by the end of 2013. Still, regular CNBC or business news viewers may be caught off-guard that a network with such a lucrative dayside news schedule would branch out into entertainment.

“We had been building out vertically, business-related content into primetime for the last couple of years,” says Brian Steel, CNBC’s senior VP of public relations. “We have been successful with the long-form documentaries, and some of the out-of-house produced shows like “American Greed,” and candidly, we were coming off the sixth consecutive year of record operating profit, and we thought it was time to try something different, to try and broaden the audience that we already had.”
Read more

CNBC Acquires ‘Nightly Business Report’

CNBC has acquired the PBS series “Nightly Business Report.” CNBC will move production of the show to its Englewood Cliffs, NJ world headquarters. For decades the show was co-anchored from the Miami studios of WPBT, NBR’s founding PBS sponsor.

The show has had several owners over the past several years. In 2010, WPBT sold it to a company run by Mykalai Kontilai, a public television program distributor who was also the manager for mixed martial artist Tito Ortiz. Kontilai sold the show to Atalaya Capital Management in 2011, who sold to CNBC today.

The show has seen cuts as Atalaya looked for a buyer. Seven staffers lost their jobs late last year when the the show’s Chicago bureau closed. The managing editor and executive vice president were also cut last year.

Beginning March 4, NBR will be anchored by CNBC’s Tyler Mathisen and Susie Gharib, the program’s current co-anchor, herself a former CNBC anchor. The network intends to maintain the familiar look, feel and format of the program which is seen on 180 PBS stations nationwide. “We are proud to take the reins of television’s longest running business program,” said Mark Hoffman, CEO of CNBC. “Our goal is to utilize our global editorial resources to both preserve and strengthen “Nightly Business Report.”

The show’s founding anchor Paul Kangas, retired in 2009 after 30 years of hosting the show.

Who’s In Line to Take Over at NBC News?

In his farewell note to staff, departing NBC News president Steve Capus writes, “I have much I hope to accomplish in the next phase of my career.” So, too, do the men and women vying to replace Capus. Capus says NBCU News group Chairman Pat Fili-Krushel “will be meeting with people throughout the division, and articulating her vision for the NBCUniversal News Group.”

There are strong internal candidates, some of whom, it has been announced by Fili-Krushel, will take on additional duties. Alex Wallace (above, right), who oversees “Today,” and “Rock Center” will now oversee “Nightly News,” where she was once EP. Wallace, who’s been with NBC since 2005, would be the first female news president after nine men have held the job since 1968.

Phil Griffin will likely be considered for the job. As president of MSNBC for the last 4 and a half years he has given the network an identity and boosted ratings, consistently topping CNN — a network his close friend Jeff Zucker now runs. A front office and internal concern would be the progressive programming on the network, often not in line with NBC News standards. Mark Hoffman, president of CNBC, cannot be ruled out. Nor can Capus’ deputy, Antoine Sanfuentes, (above, left) who will run day-to-day in the interim.

External candidates are also plentiful…

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>