GalleyCat AppNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

What Is Slate Premium? The Publisher’s New Method For Monetization

slate-premium1Slate is dipping its toe in the membership pool.

Digital publishers keep experimenting with different methods of monetization, whether through metered paywalls, crowdsourcing, events or subscriptions, to see which one’s the answer to the pressing and increasingly complicated revenue question.

In a blog post Monday, Slate Editor David Plotz introduced Slate Plus, a membership option for the most passionate Slate fans. For those who pay $5 monthly or $50 a year, Plotz said readers “who support [Slate] journalism and want a closer connection to it” get perks like access to Slate writers through Slate Plus member-only discussions, early viewing of certain articles, ad-free podcasts, 30 percent off live events, single page articles rather than pesky pagination and special commenting privileges.

But don’t worry — this is not a paywall. As Plotz noted, all the free stuff on Slate will stay free. The membership fee just buys you extras, a benefit package they’ll be adding to over time. This type of model has been described as a “reverse paywall,” one that GigaOm’s Mathew Ingram has said is a good way to reward loyal readers rather than penalizing them.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Get $25 OFF Freelancing 101 Online 

Freelancing 101Freelancing 101 starts in less than a week! Don't miss your last chance to save $25 on full registration for this online boot camp with code FLANCE25! Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now! 

Get Your Personal Essay Published in Saveur

magazines_articleIn part three of our Personal Essay Markets series, we got the inside scoop from another 15 pubs on what editors are looking for in a personal essay.

With mags ranging from Psychology Today to Southwest Airlines’ Spirit, you’re sure to find at least one venue that appeals to you. Perhaps you have a food-related story? Here, a Saveur editor shares her pitching advice:

Saveur – “Memories” and “Essay”
Foodies will appreciate these personal essay columns that involve a truly remarkable story, however large or small the scale. “Memories” is a story told about the past. “Essay” is a personal perspective on food, dish, person or ingredient, but it’s a story that isn’t past tense.
Length: 1,000-2,000 words
Pay: $1 a word
Assigning editor: Betsy Andrews, BETSY dot ANDREWS at BONNIERCORP dot COM
Andrews’ advice: “It’s best to submit “Memories” pieces or “Essay” pieces on spec. If there are recipes we can get out of them, that’s great but not necessary. We have published many, many stories about writers’ immigrant grandmother and their food, so think outside the box in terms of subject matter.”

For pitching tips from other pubs, read: Personal Essay Markets: Part III.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Inflight Entertainment Company Global Eagle Inks Deal with Digital Newsstand Leader Magzter

global eagle post pic
A recent deal announced by inflight entertainment company Global Eagle and digital content provider Magzter will give airlines—and their passengers—access to thousands of local, regional and international magazines.

The initial rollout of the service will be made available to Global Eagle’s airline partners Dubai-based Fly Dubai and Brazil’s largest carrier, TAM Airlines. Read more

The Silence at The Intercept Is A Reflection of Startup Newsroom Difficulties

0ca4fbfa-ee45-4a5c-8995-24920f11e534-620x372Just over two months after publishing its first revelations about the NSA’s mass surveillance program, First Look Media’s The Intercept is taking a break. Well, sort of.

The newest member of the team (that we know of), built around former Guardian journalist and Edward Snowden cohort Glenn Greenwald, is editor-in-chief John Cook of Gawker. And on Monday, April 14, Cook took to the Intercept’s blog to explain why there hasn’t been a whole lot of action from The Intercept’s reporting team.

The main reason for the lack of reporting coming out of the team, which also includes Liliana Segura formerly of The Nation, is that they launched before they were 100 percent ready to launch. That is, they started posting stories detailing the NSA’s surveillance and other government programs before they were fully staffed and had a long-term vision for what The Intercept should be. Wrote Cook:

Until we have completed the work of getting staffed up and conceptually prepared for the launch of a full-bore news operation that will be producing a steady stream of shit-kicking stories, The Intercept will be narrowly focusing on one thing and one thing only: Reporting out stories from the NSA archive as quickly and responsibly as is practicable. We will do so at a tempo that suits the material. When we are prepared to publish those stories, we will publish them. When we are not, we will be silent for a time, unless Glenn Greenwald has some blogging he wants to do, because no one can stop Glenn Greenwald from blogging.

So there you go. The Intercept’s decision to go live was based on a broader obligation to just start reporting, “not based on an assessment that everything that one needs for the successful launch of a news web site — staff, editorial capacity, and answers to questions about the site’s broader focus, operational strategy, structure, and design,” said Cook.

Personally, I appreciate the sentiment that the website and editorial strategy don’t have to be perfect in order to set up shop. Ezra Klein‘s Vox did something similar and dubbed the site’s first iteration “a work in progress,” almost as if to invite criticism. The idea that The Intercept — even with such a specific topic focus — should have hammered out every single detail about what it wanted to be before launching is unfair. But, I can understand the complaints around the Web that The Intercept’s design is boring at best, given the $250 million eBay founder Pierre Omidyar funneled into the project. For all we know, though, part of their silence could be allowing for a total makeover.

Read more

Online News Outlet Alaska Dispatch Buys Legacy Competitor Anchorage Daily News

anchorage daily news post pic

Online news has certainly come a long way from the early days of the Internet when many were skeptical of the credibility of online-only news operations.

The recent announcement that the Alaska Dispatch, a born and bred, online-only news operation, will buy the McClatchy-owned Anchorage Daily News, Alaska’s largest daily newspaper, sent more than a few ripples through the news industry. Read more

NEXT PAGE >>