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Karen Fratti

Karen Fratti is a media and technology writer based in New York City. You can follow her at @karenfratti.

Submit Your Work for the Newswomen’s Club of New York Front Page Awards Now

FPA-Awards_2010_400pxCalling all female journos in the New York metro area: it’s time to submit your work for the Newswomen’s Club of New York Front Page awards. The application process is now open for work that was published or broadcast between September 1, 2013 and August 1, 2014. There are new submission categories this year — there are categories for online, newspaper, magazine, photography, wires, and other reporting. In each category, they accept entries for spot reporting, opinion pieces, digital video, blog posts, photo essays, fashion, science, and sports reporting, among others. You can see where you fit in here. Basically, if you work in news in any format in or around New York, you have something you can submit.

There are also two memorial awards: the Martha Coman award for best new journalist, which is open to all categories, and the Marie Colvin award to honor reporting done in a foreign market by a New York journalist. Martha Coman was one of the first female  reporters for the New York Herald and a founding member of The New York Newspaper Women’s Club. Marie Colvin was killed in Syria in 2012 while covering the war for The Sunday Times. 

You can apply and find out more information about the awards here.

The awards will be presented at a gala this November in New York City. Submissions are due September 5, so get a move on.

Image via Newswomen’ Club of New York

Friday Link Roundup: Native Advertising and a ‘Cool’ Button

coolbuttonIt’s been a busy week for breaking and on-going news, so why not try to relax this weekend with a little journalist-focused navel gazing?

1) First of all, if you aren’t already hooked on Last Week Tonight, you should get hooked. Not only is it funny, but he rants often about things we care about, most notably net neutrality. This week, it was native advertising. I agree with him — but Digiday says he’s gotten it wrong. I call that “repurposed bovine waste.”

Read more

Does Your Newsroom Throwback on Thursday?

hashtagIn the name of clicks, and appearing to be social media savvy, news organizations have hopped on the #tbt train. For those that live under a rock, #tbt is the hashtag used for “Throwback Thursday,” an excuse to post your prom picture on Instagram, or tweet a link to an old blog post you’re especially proud of.

News organizations have started their own throwback features as an excuse for mid-morning Thursday content. When done well, it works as a good way to get people to dig through your archives or remind people of your authority, as in, “we’ve always covered politics, here’s a piece from 1943 to remind you of our expertise.” Read more

The Twitter Feature to End All Twitter Corrections Mishaps for Newsrooms

twitterIf there is one thing I do over here, it’s complain about how news outlets correct themselves, rant about the ethics of reporting news on Twitter, and wonder about best practices on social media. Now, Twitter has added a feature where you can embed a tweet within a tweet, and my head has exploded.

This changes everything about the do’s and don’ts of reporting breaking news and correcting yourself on social media. It still has to be done manually and only from the desktop version of Twitter or the official iOS and Android apps. But it’s easy: you copy the entire url of the tweet you want to embed, add a little comment, and voila: the original tweet is there. Read more

The News, in 100 Words or Less

abridgemeUh, oh, the sky is falling.

This month, AbridgeME.com launched as the first user-generated summation tool for news articles. Weird timing, right? At a moment when everyone is dedicated to  providing stacks of digital flashcards and explainers for the news, founder Eric Rems wants to cut to the chase.

His reasoning? Everyone explains and comments — just look at your Twitter feed right now and count the links to opinions on the news — and he wants to provide readers with fact based summaries of the news. This way, you can start to delve into the topic with the facts and only the facts. Then you can create your reading adventure across the web and decide for yourself as you dig in rather than start with the editorial and have them choose sides for you.  Read more

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