GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

apps

Newsdeck Helps Companies Share News

Does your company still share news the old way, via long email threads or embedded links? Well, a free corporate news sharing app from Newsdeck just might be the answer.

newsdeck post picFounded in 2007 and based in Luxembourg, NEWSDECK bills itself as more than simply a news curation tool and more of a “productivity app intended for the enterprise world.” Read more

‘Post-Mobile’ Is Inevitable: Why Journalists Shouldn’t Dismiss Google Glass

glassBeing cranky and snowed in on the east coast, I was ready to remain skeptical when talking to Robert Hernandez, USC Annenberg journalism professor, about his work with Google Glass and what news orgs could do with them. But his determination to explore what he calls ‘post-mobile’ tools and how journalists can use them convinced me. I (almost) want a pair, once they’re more stylish and I don’t have to talk to them, which will happen, according to Hernandez.

“When have we as an industry ever benefited by dismissing or feeling above an emerging technology?” he asks.

From the internet itself, to blogging, or micro-blogging, or mobile, you’d think we’d have learned our lesson by now. The debate shouldn’t be about when it’s going to catch on or how dorky they look or how people don’t want to talk to themselves to find information. It’s about getting in there and finding out how we might start to use the technology.

Google Glass isn’t the best iteration of itself , but the ‘post-mobile’ world is inevitable, he says, “and if its inevitable what are the features that you want?” He’s calling it post-mobile or micro-content:

I was going to call it ‘light content’ but I know haters will think of ‘fluffy’ content. The premise of Google Glass is that it doesn’t affect your life…it’s not an immersive thing, it’s about eliminating the time, those seconds, of pulling out your phone and unlocking it and searching. Is that good or bad? I’m not going there.”

He’s right. Think about when Twitter came out and we all rolled our eyes over 140 characters. Read more

Facebook’s ‘Paper’ App: What You Should Know

paperToday is Facebook’s 10th birthday (feel old yet?), so it’s only fitting that the Mark Zuckerberg-led team launched a pretty bold (and, in my opinion), beautiful reincarnation of itself just yesterday.

Universe, meet Paper, the app that’s meant to combine your traditional Facebook feed, complete with your friends’ photo albums, statuses and check-ins, with news stories from a host of respected, national publications in one experience.

Paper pivots around the abstract notion of stories, and its focus on this concept is quite successful. In its most basic form, Paper has all the functionality of the Facebook mobile app. But Paper is leaps and bounds ahead of its predecessor because it was structured with a mobile-first mindset, unlike Facebook, which had to be reimagined years after its initial design during the “desktop age,” Business Insider reviewer Jim Edwards wrote Monday.

“Paper appears to be Facebook’s answer to the question, ‘If we were to re-create Facebook as a standalone app that delivered a beautiful, simple, highly focused experience, what would it look like? Well, it looks like Paper,’” he continued.

After spending some time with Paper, I think there are just three things you should know about the app:

Read more

Your App is a “Walkie-Talkie” and You Need to Start Using It Like One

docwalkietalkieAs news publishers talk about ‘unbolting’ their digital enterprises and newsrooms work on being more mobile in the name of more engaged with their audiences, it’s hard to imagine what that eventually looks like. To start, it might be helpful not to change our actual news products but focus on new ways of using what we have.

Investing in baby steps, if you will.

That’s what the guys behind the software seem to think anyway. Mag+ is the ‘content publishing ecosystem’ and software behind many of the newspaper and magazine apps you might read — New York Magazine, The Atlantic Weekly, Bloomberg Markets, Chicago Sun-Times, Popular Science, and The Next Web to name a few.

They’ve also just released an upgrade to their software that mirrors some general trends in news publishing. Mike Haney, co-founder and creative director for Mag+, says that the upgrade focused on redesigning the storefront and better sorting, so users know what they have when they want it. They’ve also partnered with eMagazine Insight, so publishers can track the effectiveness of in-app links and banners and hone their marketing campaigns. Most interesting for a mobile newsroom is the take on push notifications and alert channels. Another partner, Appboy, brings custom segemented messaging to Mag+ apps. From their release:

In addition to issues, the app can deliver custom push notifications, promotions, cross app promotions, in-app notifications and news feed items that can be specifically targeted to users based on what they’ve done in the app. Combined with a built-in feedback tool, these features make the platform a more effective communications tool and opens it for a broader range of uses.

It’s just one step in looking at the app as a multi-channeled tool to build better engagement with readers. Haney explains:

We talk about being a content hub. Its not about just designing your issue and pushing it out, but it’s about creating a relationship with your consumer. It’s like a walkie-talkie — you have one in your pocket and they have the other one, and you have the ability to reach out and talk to them and give them control about what they get from you. Read more

‘Inside’ News App Seeks to Develop ‘World’s Best News Service’

inside“World’s best news service,” eh? Now that is a lofty goal. But it’s one that the team at Inside is shooting toward.

Inside.com, an app and website that presents 1,000 of the day’s most important stories in 300 characters or less (written by the site’s curation team), launched earlier this week to mostly positive reviews among tech and media bloggers. The founder and CEO of Inside, Jason Calacanisset out to create a news reader that would summarize in quick spurts the highest quality news, on any topic, because he’s tired of wasting time on click-bait articles and unsubstantial reporting online.

Calacanis and his team set forth the following guidelines in developing Inside, which they’re calling “sort of like Pandora for news.”

1. It would be mobile — specifically for smartphones
2. It would be real-time
3. It would be fact-filled
4. It would connect folks to the world’s best journalism
5. It would respect the reader’s time

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>