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Center for Investigative Reporting to Launch Public Radio Show

CIRThanks to the Reva and David Logan Foundation, along with the Ford Foundation, the Center for Investigative Reporting has garnered $3.5 million in support to launch an investigative public radio show and podcast called “Reveal.”

CIR’s Lisa Cohen says the nonprofit, nonpartisan journalism outfit will co-produce the show with the Public Radio Exchange (PRX), highlighting some of CIR’s ongoing investigations, as well as the watchdog journalism of other initiatives, in their one-hour radio show. CIR and PRX also plan to create special digital video and animations and data interactives for their web properties, and host live events.

Right now, investigations on CIR include the current surveillance state, toxic waste in Silicon Valley, border issues, the American criminal justice system and more. I’m hoping to see continuing coverage of those topics on the air waves and wondering how they will be presented for radio.

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Writing Outside the Mainstream

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3 Lessons From NPR’s Decision to Cut “Tell Me More”

NPRNational Public Radio’s “Tell Me More” radio program will be cut Aug. 1 due to budget constraints, and 28 positions will be eliminated in the process, according to the New York TimesElizabeth Jensen. The show, focused on issues most relevant to minority listeners, has been on the air for seven years, and NPR was forced to cut it in overcoming a $6 million budget shortage.

It’s always sad to highlight layoffs in our industry — trust me, I do not enjoy it and acknowledge that it could easily be me (eight of the 28 positions aren’t currently filled, if that’s any consolation to the bad news at all). But we shouldn’t let a news organization’s failure come and go without taking the time to learn from its mistakes. Based on what I know about “Tell Me More” and how NPR is handling the aftermath of the program’s cut, here are a few lessons I feel can be learned from “Tell Me More”‘s plight:

1. Know your audience. Read more

Tribune’s ‘Newsbeat’ App Will Read the News for You

Newsbeat1

News apps for mobile have become must-haves for media companies. Newsbeat, the latest app from Tribune Digital, wants to make accessing the news on your mobile device easier than ever. It does this by reading the news for you. Read more

Why Was Planet Money’s Kickstarter Campaign So Successful?

At the time of this writing, NPR’s Planet Money has raised $524,286 on Kickstarter. The project has a day left, and is a pretty remarkable feat considering the sum is more than 10 times their initial goal of $50,000. So how did they do it? Read more

At $170,000+, ‘99% Invisible’ Becomes Most Funded Kickstarter in Journalism

An update to our post last week: the pledges kept coming, and the most funded journalism project in Kickstarter’s history is now a small-staffed podcast about design.

If you didn’t read it, public radio’s Roman Mars started a crowdfunding campaign this summer with a goal of $42,000 to help fund extra help for its third season of 99% Invisible, his side project focusing on the “invisible” activity that shapes our lives. (It was a necessary gamble– most of the money was slotted to hire former intern Sam Greenspan and make production more manageable.) In the end the radio show distributed by Public Radio Exchange more than hit its goal, and more than doubled its goal, too—the project funded its goal 405 percent.

A total of 5,661 backers crowdfunded it to a whopping $170,477.

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