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blogging

A Fashion Blogger Shares Tips on Creating a Successful Blog

Blogging is on the front line of digital media, and while the accessibility of creating your own blog may seem like a lighthearted hobby to do on a Sunday morning Vicki Sullivan, founder of Aspiring Socialite, explains there’s more to it than that.

When done strategically, blogging can be a lucrative career that involves doing what you truly love. In our latest Journalism Advice article, Sullivan explains the steps writers should take when starting their own fashion blog (or any blog for that matter.)

In particular, one of her key points is to not see your fellow bloggers as competition; instead, use this network to your advantage:

“It’s been my experience that collaborating with other bloggers increases your traffic and social media following much more than if you were going at it alone,” Sullivan said.

For more blogging advice, read: The Keys to Starting Your Own Fashion Blog.

 

The Silence at The Intercept Is A Reflection of Startup Newsroom Difficulties

0ca4fbfa-ee45-4a5c-8995-24920f11e534-620x372Just over two months after publishing its first revelations about the NSA’s mass surveillance program, First Look Media’s The Intercept is taking a break. Well, sort of.

The newest member of the team (that we know of), built around former Guardian journalist and Edward Snowden cohort Glenn Greenwald, is editor-in-chief John Cook of Gawker. And on Monday, April 14, Cook took to the Intercept’s blog to explain why there hasn’t been a whole lot of action from The Intercept’s reporting team.

The main reason for the lack of reporting coming out of the team, which also includes Liliana Segura formerly of The Nation, is that they launched before they were 100 percent ready to launch. That is, they started posting stories detailing the NSA’s surveillance and other government programs before they were fully staffed and had a long-term vision for what The Intercept should be. Wrote Cook:

Until we have completed the work of getting staffed up and conceptually prepared for the launch of a full-bore news operation that will be producing a steady stream of shit-kicking stories, The Intercept will be narrowly focusing on one thing and one thing only: Reporting out stories from the NSA archive as quickly and responsibly as is practicable. We will do so at a tempo that suits the material. When we are prepared to publish those stories, we will publish them. When we are not, we will be silent for a time, unless Glenn Greenwald has some blogging he wants to do, because no one can stop Glenn Greenwald from blogging.

So there you go. The Intercept’s decision to go live was based on a broader obligation to just start reporting, “not based on an assessment that everything that one needs for the successful launch of a news web site — staff, editorial capacity, and answers to questions about the site’s broader focus, operational strategy, structure, and design,” said Cook.

Personally, I appreciate the sentiment that the website and editorial strategy don’t have to be perfect in order to set up shop. Ezra Klein‘s Vox did something similar and dubbed the site’s first iteration “a work in progress,” almost as if to invite criticism. The idea that The Intercept — even with such a specific topic focus — should have hammered out every single detail about what it wanted to be before launching is unfair. But, I can understand the complaints around the Web that The Intercept’s design is boring at best, given the $250 million eBay founder Pierre Omidyar funneled into the project. For all we know, though, part of their silence could be allowing for a total makeover.

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Longreads Joins Forces With Automattic, Owner of WordPress

Screen Shot 2014-04-11 at 1.36.20 PMDuring the month of its five-year anniversary, Longreads was bought by Autommatic, the web development company best known for its ownership of WordPress (also Gravatar and Polldaddy, for the nerdiest types).

Longreads, started by former journalist and longform journalism enthusiast Mark Armstrong in 2009, announced April 9 it was joining forces with Autommatic in order to expand its impact and better equip itself to share the best longform (1,500+ words) work on the web.

“The world cannot live on 140 characters alone,” Automattic CEO Matt Mullenweg said to Bloomberg Businessweek. “Longreads embodies a lot of what we really value with Automattic and WordPress.”

This move makes total sense. WordPress.com is the “largest and most influential publishing ecosystem in the world,” as Armstrong wrote, and its content management system powers the work of big news brands like NYPost.com and Quartz, and lesser known yet immensely talented freelance writers. Longreads is constantly looking for great journalism to share, while competing against sites like Byliner, and Automattic’s WordPress offers writers a place where their journalism can live. So, it’s a win-win situation. And, in a SXSW talk last year, Mullenweg said WordPress was looking for a way to delve deeper into — and monetize — longform journalism, as what became known as the longform “renaissance” had really started to take shape.

 


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Nudged by Social Media, Martin’s Breads Removes Controversial “Yoga Mat” Additive

Few consumers knew exactly what Azodicarbonamide was before food blogger Vani Hari of foodbabe.com campaigned Subway Sandwich Shops to remove the controversial “yoga mat” chemical and food additive from their breads.

martin's post picNow, in response to hundreds of customer requests via a combination of calls and social media messages on Facebook and Twitter, Martin’s Famous Pastry Shoppe, Inc., makers of Martin’s Potato Breads and other baked goods, announced it is planning to remove Azodicarbonamide (ADA) from its’ products “as soon as they are able.” Read more

NPR Partners With Quora to Cover Sochi 2014

72415v4-max-250x250Sochi 2014 is well underway now, and news surrounding the event, whether journalist complaints about hotel conditions on social media or traditional Olympics coverage, is pretty easy to find.

But to add another layer of context and value to the Olympics experience for the viewer at home, public radio broadcaster NPR is partnering with Quora. NPR is teaming up with the popular blogging/knowledge platform to cross-post interesting questions and answers created by Quora readers specifically related to this year’s Winter Games.

Kate Myers of NPR Business Partnerships announced the collaboration in a post on Quora last week.

“A key part of our mission at National PublicRadio is to create a more informed public — one challenged and invigorated by a deeper understanding and appreciation of events, ideas and cultures. That’s why I appreciate Quora: it helps foster that understanding with quality answers to your questions, small and large,” Myers wrote.

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