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j-schools

Poynter Institute Survey Reveals ‘Disconnect’ Between Journalists and Educators

poynter post picA recent survey by the Poynter Institute shows that working journalists and journalism professors aren’t exactly on the same page when it comes to ranking the importance of multimedia and digital storytelling skills.

Poynter’s survey, “The Core Skills for the Future of Journalism,” uncovered glaring differences regarding the importance that working journalists and journalism educators attach to multimedia skills, including AV editing, photography and graphic design. Read more

Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

What Is A Social Journalism Degree? CUNY Is Trying to Answer That Question

CMC-CUNY-Logo3In the endless discussion on the value of a journalism degree, the question, “Are we teaching young journalists the right things the right ways?” always seems to surface. And as the digital revolution rolls on, creating curriculum that will be newsroom-relevant by the time students finish their degrees becomes complicated.

But the City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism has a fresh new idea for teaching journalism in their new degree plan — an MA in Social Journalism. As media blogger and journalism professor Jeff Jarvis wrote over at Medium, the degree is based on the idea that journalism shouldn’t be about providing content; it should be about providing a service. (He has been developing this concept for a while; he first introduced it on his blog BuzzMachine).

On top of CUNY’s core MA in Journalism and MA in Entrepreneurial Journalism tracks, the degree plan, if approved by the university and the state of New York, would teach students how to tap into a community’s heartbeat, movers and shakers and produce reporting and content based on what they learn.

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Columbia Daily Spectator Might Cut Back on Print Newspaper

The Columbia Daily Spectator  has been printing since 1877.

The Columbia Daily Spectator has been printing since 1877.

The Columbia Daily Spectator may become the first Ivy League university to do away with a daily, student-run print newspaper.

Based in the Harlem Morningside Heights neighborhood, the staff of the Spectator, established in 1877, says it plans to cut back to weekly papers. Editor-in-chief Abby Abrams told Capital New York‘s Peter Sterne that the new printing schedule would “allow all our writers and editors to produce the best content possible.”

Although the decision must be officially approved by the Spec‘s 11-member board, it can’t be argued that the paper’s print product lost money for the first time this year. Still, despite the well-known difficulties print publishers have with generating revenue, Abrams told Capital that reducing print output isn’t based on desperation.

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McGraw Center for Business Journalism Offers Up to $15,000 Fellowship for In-depth Business Reporting

A new initiative established at CUNY’s Graduate School of Journalism will offer fellowships of up to $15,000 to experienced business journalists starting this spring.

mcgraw center post picThe McGraw Fellowship for Business Journalism supports in-depth coverage of crucial issues related to the global economy and business. Read more

Arizona State Journalism Students Collaborate With Citizen Journalists

8.24-CronkiteThanks to a $250,000 grant from the Knight Foundation, students at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism now help comprise a new American Public Media Public Insight Network (PIN) hub.

What does that mean, you ask? Basically, ASU J-schoolers now have the opportunity to work alongside faculty members and media professionals as they correspond with PIN sources. The newest home of PIN, a thriving digital platform where more than 215,000 citizen experts have volunteered their expertise and angles to reporters across the country, will live in the Cronkite School’s downtown Phoenix campus building.

Organizations like the Seattle Times, NPR, the Washington Post, Columbia J-School and dozens of others utilize the PIN platform to find trustworthy information for news coverage quickly and to incorporate diverse views into their reporting. Surely, ASU’s implementation of PIN fosters a “teaching hospital” environment. Plus, usage of the PIN platform in Arizona benefits American Public Media, as it works to sustain the initiative in the future.

Said David Kansas, American Public Media’s senior vice president and chief operating officer, in a press release: “It will provide an important service to the industry and a rich educational experience and career pipeline for students while helping to position PIN and the networked journalism it fosters for long-term sustainability.”

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