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Photojournalism

Enter Your Work for Free in Smithsonian Photo Contest

Calling all photographers: the 12th annual Smithsonian Photo Contest deadline is coming up on November 28th. Have you entered yet? It’s free, so you should probably get on it.

Entries fall into six categories: The Natural World, Travel, People, The American Experience, Altered Images, and Mobile Photos. There’s one grand prize of $2,500, then each category has its own winner at $500, and there is a Reader’s Choice award who will receive $500, too.

They will announce 60 finalists in February and after that will hold a month-long online vote for the Reader’s Choice Award. We’ll give you a heads up when you can vote. You can read more about the contest and the rules here. For inspiration, Smithsonian spokesperson Melissa Wiley shared some of her favorite entries so far:

Mediabistro Course

Get a Literary Agent

Get a Literary AgentWork with a publishing consultant to find the right agent for your book and write a query that will get the deal done! Starting December 3, learn the best methods for finding a literary agent, how to choose the right agent for your book, the etiquette of seeking literary representation, and how to stand out among the numerous queries agents receive daily. Register now!

Deadline for National Geographic Photo Contest on Halloween

NGLogo560x430-cb1343821768You have only three more days to get your best photos into National Geographic Magazine for the pub’s annual photo contest. If you have photos dying to be seen and shared, this contest is a great way to get exposure and a shot at some serious cash.

But the competition is quite tough. According to the magazine, more than 7,000 entries from 150 countries rolled in during the 2013 go-round. The top winner wins a grand prize of $10,000 and a trip to the National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C., to participate in the annual National Geographic Photography Seminar in January 2015. (That seminar alone sounds like an awesome prize, and what a resume booster.)

Click here for the rules of the contest, and here for more information. Even if you’re not entering the contest, it’s worth following NG‘s photo blog each week for editor’s picks of photos. Now go forth and snap photos!

 

The CIR Is On It: Telling the Story of Solitary Confinement for Teens Over, and Over, and Over Again

CIR the boxThis week, the Center for Investigative Reporting released a print story, a short animation, and a photo essay about solitary confinement for adolescents in the U.S. prison system. That’s in addition to a NewsHour and a public radio piece released last month and to a yet unreleased half hour documentary and graphic novel. By the end of the month, there will be around 10 pieces of the adolescent solitary confinement story circling you on one form of media or another.

It’s enough to make you rethink what you’ve been reporting on all year. CIR reporters Daffodil Altan and Trey Bundy started over a year ago trying to gain access into prisons and report on conditions for teens. Altan says that the access issues surrounding the story seemed “almost insurmountable” at a certain point. Instead of being deterred, they pressed on and worked on thinking of different ways to handle the content. Says Altan:

We started of thinking of ways to tell the story even though we were dealing with essentially invisible sights. That’s  where the idea for the animation came up. We had met this very compelling young man in New York who told us about his experience at Rikers very powerfully and we had all this tape of him…we decided to try to take 3 hours of interview and see if we could carve that into something smaller and with a narrative arc.

And so the reporting team of two or three turned into a team of somewhere around 15-20, according to Bundy. Bundy says that as they are reporting they’re “always having conversations about what else we can do besides what we’ve already settled on.” In this case, there was a written story in mind, with photos to boot. But a colleague who acts as a liaison between the CIR and KQED “heard radio all over this,” says Bundy. When New York State started talking about banning the practice of solitary confinement for teenagers, NewsHour suddenly wanted the story sooner. “That wasn’t always supposed to be the first piece that was released on this,” Bundy adds. Having the story told across platforms means you reach more people. Says Bundy, “There’s some overlap between people who listen to public radio or watch NewsHour, or read Medium, but it’s not total overlap. The benefit of having multiple platforms is that you are going to catch multiple, different types of audiences, hopefully.”

Read more

Where to Get Free or Low-Cost Digital Journalism Training

dig. journ feat picNeed to brush-up on your digital journalism skills? You might want to check-out some free or low-cost, online courses being offered within the next few months.

The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley is always a good bet for training as is the Society of Professional Journalists and of course, Poynter’s News University. Read more

New Media Resources for Journos

journosources

“Anyone mourning the ‘death of journalism’ based on the closure of a few newspapers hasn’t been paying attention,” begins journalismdegree.org’s latest feature on new media resources. We couldn’t agree more! (Full disclosure: We’re honored to be featured in the piece). With 105 sites/tools/resources for traditional and new media journos alike, it’s definitely worth a bookmark. The feature covers ‘General New Media Journalism,’ ‘Digital Storytelling,’  ‘Interactive Media’ and ‘Video and Photography.’

Check it out here.

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