GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

social media

Making Sense of Social Media Metrics in the Newsroom

social-media-1There are so many ways to use and track social media success in the newsroom; it can make your head spin. In a recent report on The Media Briefing, writer Chris Sutcliffe outlines how to make sense of all those numbers, and what some of the best social media editors in the industry do. The whole piece is worth a long, hard read, but here are some of the main points.

1. You need to decide on a story by story basis what you want to achieve via social media. Sarah Marshall, social media director for the Wall Street Journal says:

Are you wanting to achieve clickthroughs, or are you wanting to give people a service? Now if you’re properly doing your job best, you’re giving people a service, you’re telling people what’s going on in Kobani at the moment, or what Turkey’s position is, you’re essentially giving them a service but not requiring them to click through either on Facebook or Twitter. But then as a news organisation you don’t get the hits.”

2. Newsrooms need to focus on what kinds of stories do well on various platforms and go from there. Do you create content specifically for a platform? Maybe. Or it could even be as simple as changing the way you write the headline on Facebook as opposed to Twitter.

3. You can use reader response as a way to edit the story. As long as you’re updating and letting readers know you’re updating (and not just erasing your mistakes and sneaking off), you should gauge a story’s success and make it better. If people are going to be looking, you might want to change that featured image. Or link to more content internally. It’s also a way to know what interests people, leading to better follow-ups and additional content, an interactive map of election districts if a gerrymandering story is performing well, for example.

The whole point is to use social media and analyze it. How does your newsroom use metrics to change the workflow?

Mediabistro Course

Get a Literary Agent

Get a Literary AgentWork with a publishing consultant to find the right agent for your book and write a query that will get the deal done! Starting December 3, learn the best methods for finding a literary agent, how to choose the right agent for your book, the etiquette of seeking literary representation, and how to stand out among the numerous queries agents receive daily. Register now!

Israeli Tech Start-up Spot.IM Enables Publishers To Turn Visitors Into a Community

spot.im post picThe creators of Tel Aviv-based Spot.IM say that their free platform, now currently in Beta, can turn any website into its own social network, thus greatly diminishing the need and reliance on external, social media giants such as Facebook, Twitter and countless others.
Read more

This Twitter Bot Doesn’t Like Your Headlines

twitterMargarita Noriega, Fusion’s director of social media, wants you to stop assuming things about your audience. Yesterday, she and Andrew Briggs, a web developer who’s also behind whowritesfor.com, let loose a little Twitter bot: @speak4yrself.

The bot responds to lame Twitter teasers and headlines that we all write: “5 Things You Didn’t Know About Puppies.” “You Have to Try This Beer.” Not even Fusion is above a scolding:

Read more

Do You Yo? And Should Your Newsroom Be Yo-ing?

yo-its-that-simpleIt’s getting harder and harder for me to keep up with what the kids are doing these days, but I’ve at least heard about ‘Yo’. If you haven’t heard of it yet, the app is a messaging service that bases its platform around the frequent sending of a two-letter word: “Yo.”

No fancy filtered photos. No emojis. Just one, single greeting (with possibly a link/short hashtagged tack-on, thanks to a recent update). Whenever you want to get someone’s attention, you simply send “Yo,” and ideally, your straightforward message would notify your friend, the receiver, as effectively as a text message or email might. According to the American Journalism Review‘s Cory Blair, the app has seen 2.6 million downloads since April 1 of this year. For whatever reason, people are really into “Yo-ing” eachother.

Reported Blair, the Washington Post‘s audience strategy and social media teams want to experiment with using the Yo app for letting readers know when stories have been published. As if Twitter’s 140-character limit doesn’t present enough of a communication challenge, Yo provides even less space for disseminating information. The idea is to have WaPo readers and social media followers who use the Yo app to follow the newspaper on Yo. Then when they have a story to share, they will send a “Yo” to subscribers, and those folks get a notification on their phone. No need to open up (or pay for) a news app to get instant access to news anymore. Others including NBC Nightly News and the Nieman Lab are doing it, too, Blair wrote. Publishers can choose how and when they want to “Yo” — it could only be for beat-specific stories or at a certain time of day.

Read more

Grading the Media on Ferguson Coverage

Now that the Ferguson protests are slowly beginning to wind down, it’s likely a good time to assess how the media handled the coverage of the recent unrest, triggered by the police shooting of unarmed teen, Michael Brown.

From the coverage I’ve seen myself, I would have to grade the media a C to C-, mainly for coverage that I thought was uneven, at best, with some national reporters even crossing journalistic lines to become advocates, rather than unbiased, objective third-parties. Read more

NEXT PAGE >>