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National Journal Launches Document Library

nj logoNeed some background research for a complicated energy policy story? Or a good idea for your niche publication to demonstrate its value for readers?

Take a tip from the National Journal, which launched a the Document Library this week — free and unlimited to members and subscribers, free and limited for non-members — full of docs, white papers, reports, and more. From the release:

The new National Journal Document Library is a growing collection of research reports, testimonies, white papers, and press releases updated in near real-time from the websites of hundreds of sources that include global government agencies, think tanks, trade associations, and academic and corporate institutions.

As mentioned, member and subscribers can access the Library directly here. Non-members can access a limited version of the Library thru the policy verticals:  Energy, Healthcare, Tech and Defense. It’s not obvious — you have to scroll down the homepage of the section and you’ll see it next to the Twitter feed.

The library is interesting to me not just because it’s another resource, but because it’s another example of a publication making it clear that journalism isn’t just about reporting, it’s about researching. We all knew that, but it’s starting to be important to make that a key component of the business model. This is what First Look Media’s targeted ‘digital magazines’ are about, and in the same vein of what Ezra Klein is talking about with Project X – being not just about reporting the news but serving as a resource for the public. It’s about getting to the root of ‘journalism as public service.’

No better, or simpler, way to inform and educate than taking advantage of technology and making it free, to boot.

 

Steve Buttry Wants to Change How You Work (It Will Be Better, We Promise)

project unboltMost of our newsrooms, if we’re honest, are print organizations with the digital initiative “bolted on.” Or so admitted Digital First Media CEO John Paton. I can’t decide whether I’m jealous of or pity the man, Steve Buttry, who has been tasked with unbolting four test newsrooms as DFM’s digital transformation editor.

He obviously knew what he was getting into. More than just refocusing attention to mobile reporting, engaging with audiences over social media or creating new ways to play with and use data, Project Unbolt is about actually changing how newsrooms think and act. Buttry elaborated on his blog this week about what it will actually entail and look like to ‘wrench’ newsrooms away from thinking for print. Here are some highlights:

  • Everything is live, all the time. He writes:

Virtually all event coverage and breaking news coverage are handled as live coverage, with ScribbleLive, livetweeting, livestreaming, etc. This includes sports events, government meetings, trials, community festivals, etc….Live coverage is routine for the unbolted newsroom. Reporters and/or visual journalists covering events plan for live coverage unless they have a good reason not to (a judge won’t allow phones or computers in a courtroom; a family would rather not have you livetweet a funeral; connectivity at a site is poor).

  • In the unbolted newsroom, you post content when you have an audience. Digital content is fresh every morning, you aren’t planning for morning editions, and those ‘Sunday magazine’ style features go up during the week. Read more

How Dallas Reporters Used Twitter to Get Un-Banned From Public Meeting

Twitter-birdI don’t think I can say it any better than Dallas Morning News reporter Tristan Hallman said it, when he blogged for the News about how he and a handful of local TV reporters were banned from a public, town hall-style meeting involving the Dallas Police Chief one night earlier this week:

“So last night was weird. For 40 minutes, reporters were banned from a public meeting with public officials in a public building.”

Definitely a weird moment, but especially unique was the way those reporters changed the outcome of their night through their tweets.

Read more

Google’s New Site Is A One-Stop-Shop for Journalists, Newsrooms

Google Media Tools, a new site from the search giant, is a resource for everyone in the newsroom: journalists, researchers, social media managers, publishers and developers. The site combines all of Google’s tools that could be of use to a news organization, providing a central hub for media outlets. The site is split into the following sections:

GoogleMediaTools

  Read more

Response: No Comments, No Problem

Be QuietI would like to claim responsibility for Popular Science removing its comment section, but I am sure it had little do with my rant a few weeks ago.

That said, I was thrilled to read their post that ‘in the name of science,’ they’ve turned their comments off.

John Kroll writes in this blog post that there is no good reason to turn off the comments. In fact, he says turning them off is lazy and has little to do with science, and much to do with the bottom line.

Maybe it did have to do with the bottom line, but let’s take a look at some of his points: Read more

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