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Write for Passport‘s Tech-Savvy Gay Travelers

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Passport magazine has been a resource for affluent LGBT travelers since its inception in 2001. In the past 13 years, the pub has experienced huge growth and can even claim the title of first gay magazine to launch an iPad edition.

The pub is 80 percent freelance written and editors say they need writers who can tap into the specific needs of its globetrotting audience. Passport is a great place for those who enjoy long-form writing, as articles can run up to 3,500 words. As for topics:

The hallmark of the mag — the feature well — is a playground for creative angles on all things travel, but the particular focus is destinations. One story in the August 2013 issue took readers on an editorial journey à la a 10-day road trip through Florida, detailing stop-throughs in major cities, swamplands and legendary gay retreats. Another explored life in Saba, the Dutch municipality in the Caribbean where gay marriage is legal and a small LGBT community thrives.

Also worth noting: stories submitted for print may very well end up online as well, so freelancers are encouraged to pitch ideas that include photos and videos just for a little added multimedia panache.

For more on the pub, including details on the proper etiquette when sending in your submission, read: How To Pitch: Passport.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Slate Writer Amanda Hess Wins Sidney Award for Examining Online Sexism

Amanda Hess CoverIn her Sidney Award-winning essay last month in Pacific Standard: “The Next Civil Rights Issue: Why Women Aren’t Welcome on the Internet,” Slate staff writer Amanda Hess tackled yet another facet of cyber-bullying by focusing on the disproportionate abuse that female journalists endure online.

The Sidney Awards are given monthly by the Sidney Hillman Foundation, in recognition of outstanding socially-conscious journalism. Read more

Anthony Shadid Award Recognizes Ethical Journalism

Anthony Shadid, courtesy University of Wisconsin

Anthony Shadid, courtesy University of Wisconsin

New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid died in 2012 from a severe allergic reaction while crossing the Syrian border on assignment for the paper.

A highly accomplished journalist, Shadid had already won two Pulitzer Prizes for his courageous and insightful foreign correspondence.

As a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Shadid sat on the school’s center for journalism ethics advisory board and was a strong supporter of efforts to promote public interest journalism and to stimulate discussion about journalism ethics.

In recognition of Shadid’s contributions to the pursuit of ethics in journalism, the school’s center for journalism ethics recently announced a call for nominations for a new, national award: Read more

Knight Foundation, Investigative News Network Supports Nonprofit News with Micro-grants

If not for enterprising and investigative-minded journalists, the recent George Washington Bridge lane closure scandal in New Jersey might never have been brought to light.

INN picSame goes for that stubborn NY1 reporter, whose recent relentless questioning of Staten Island Congressman Michael Grimm about campaign finance irregularities led to an on-air blowup that revealed the congressman as something of a bully. Read more

How to Stop the Online Harassment of Female Journalists

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“Happy to say we live in the same state. Im looking you up, and when I find you, im going to rape you and remove your head.” That’s a tweet Slate writer Amanda Hess received from her stalker. Unfortunately, Hess’ situation is not uncommon. In fact, female journalists being harassed and threatened online has become an epidemic.

Hess recently wrote a lengthy piece on the subject for the Pacific Standard. She discovered that of all the people who reported being stalked and harassed online from 2000 to 2012, 72.5 percent were female. “No matter how hard we attempt to ignore it, this type of gendered harassment — and the sheer volume of it — has severe implications for women’s status on the Internet,” Hess argued.

How can we change this situation? Read more

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