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Archives: April 2013

How To Be Like The MailOnline: Make News, Make Video, Make Money

It was a shocker to read that the MailOnline is America’s third largest news outlet this morning, just behind NYTimes.com and WashingtonPost.com.

But it’s easy to get ahead when you have chutzpah. As a tabloid, it appears there was no hand wringing about pay models or how to fit sponsored content between slideshows of Kate Middleton’s baby bump and unsolved crime conspiracies. Sort of like the New York Post doesn’t worry about fact checking before laying our their morning edition.

From AdExchanger

 We don’t produce the content for them. What we do is create content hubs where their content will naturally fit in with our editorial. They may provide information about their products, videos showcasing their service and content relevant to topics in their product category. So we bring years of content publishing experience and an understanding of what audiences want to read. The marketer brings years of category insight and product knowledge. The end result has to provide more value to the consumer than if we had done this on our own. It’s in everyone’s interest to create something that’s entertaining. On top of that, it has to be clear that there’s a sponsor involved.

You can prattle on about the quality of the content and journalistic endeavors all you want, but the reality of digital publishing is just do it. ‘It just has to be clear that there’ a sponsor involved.’  Read more

Gawker’s Kinja Platform: Please Don’t Make Me Blog for You

It finally happened. I’m not ashamed to admit that I’m a bit of a Gawker groupie and I’ve been waiting for the rollout of Kinja on all of their sites. Not because I am an avid commenter (that requires more dedication than I can give), but because I wanted to see how it was going to work from the sidelines. I have mixed feelings.

 1) Mobile Layouts 

I know that everyone keeps saying that mobile is the future, and it is, of course. Fine. But I still don’t know how I’m supposed to work on a tablet. The old Gawker layout was optimized for a desktop experience, with the main blog post and a scroll down menu of new and trending posts. You could pick and choose, hop around the site before getting back to whatever you were avoiding before you came to Gawker in the first place.

The new Kinja layout is clean, sleek and modern. Everything you want a digital experience to be — except that you have to scroll around too much. I find myself reading many of the blurbs without actually clicking on a story. And when you do click into a story, that’s it. You have to work to browse. 

On a tablet, the Kinja reading experience makes more sense. Video and ads and posts all come together in one, non-annoying, continuous roll. My reaction to reading the new Gawker on my laptop is the first time I ever felt old. And why can’t you Tweet single posts? What’s the deal, Denton?   Read more

How Secure Are Your Social Media Accounts?

A hacked Twitter account is nothing new. Unfortunately, on a regular basis I get suspicious direct messages and tweets from friends and followers with links to who knows where. They’ve been hacked. Usually, their friends flag that and it’s quickly cleaned up.

But what happens when that hacked account has more than a half million followers? When it’s verified and belongs to one of the most venerable international news organizations? When the hacked content isn’t a questionable link but what would be the most major national security story since maybe ever?

Well, that happened yesterday when the Associated Press saw its account compromised and 71 hijacked characters about explosions at the White House sent the stock markets briefly down and got notice of everyone from the FBI to the SEC. The hacked account was quickly taken offline and suspended. But as Ryan Sholin pointed out this morning when the account was reinstated (but briefly before the offending tweet could be deleted) — more than 4,000 people had retweeted that note (and those are only the ones who used the RT button instead of quoting or adding their own commentary). Read more

Kara Swisher’s Advice to Tech Journalists: ‘Be accurate. Know your stuff’

With 20 years of experience, AllthingsD’s Kara Swisher has set the bar for reporting on the digital scene. In the latest installment of So What Do You Do?, she spoke to Mediabistro about the real reasons for her success.

“Whenever someone says, ‘Oh, how do you do it?’ I tell them that I make more calls then they do. I don’t think it’s that big of a deal,” Swisher explained. “People make a bigger deal of it, but I think I just work harder than other people. That’s all. There’s no secret sauce or anything.”

As for how other reporters can make a name for themselves online, Swisher’s advice was simple: “Be accurate; know your stuff.”

Read the full interview at So What Do You Do, Kara Swisher, Co-Executive Editor of AllThingsD.com?

Nicholas Braun

Save $50 on Mediabistro’s Grammar and Punctuation Course

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Students attending our New York session will work with Marisa Carroll, the copy chief at Seventeen. Online students will work with Gaylord Fields, editor of special projects at RollingStone.com. Regardless of which course you attend, you’ll get an invaluable review of grammar essentials that will have a lasting impact on your current and future writing projects.

The code 10WORDS will save you $50 at checkout. Seats are limited in both classes, so register soon and take the next step towards letter-perfect copy.

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