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Get $75 OFF Book Promotion and Publicity Boot Camp

BookPRBootCampGet $75 OFF registration for MediabistroEDU’s brand new online boot camp, Book Promotion & Publicity Boot Camp with code SUN75! Hurry, this boot camp starts on July 10!

In this intensive boot camp starting July 10, you will learn the publicity skills needed to ensure a successful book launch using various promotional techniques. You will hear from publishing and public relation experts who will teach you step-by-step how to successfully launch your book campaign including how to create a social media kit, use social media to build your audience, interact with fans and other authors on panels, start your own email marketing newsletter and more! View the full agenda here.

Whether you’re an author who’s already working with a big publisher or are self-published, this interactive boot camp will teach you the best methods to launch a successful publicity campaign for your book. Hurry and register before July 7 to get $75 OFF with promo code SUN75. Register now!

Jonathan Geller of Boy Genius Report on the Keys to a Great Tech Site

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Jonathan Geller, president and editor-in-chief of Boy Genius Report (the mobile tech blog), has an intuitive knowledge of what his audience wants. As a result, Geller has been able to circumnavigate the music industry, the mobile tech scene and the blogosphere with ease.

After a spell of anonymity (when he was writing for Engadget and BGR), Geller outed himself in 2010, so the world finally knew who the Boy of Boy Genius Report actually was. Geller credits his early rise to his desire to take risks and his networking skills. Here, he talks about the keys to a great tech site:

Content, content, content. You’ve also got to have a great team. You have to know your audience. You need to have that instinct, to know what people want to read. Be authentic, be engaged and interact with your readers. Whether it’s on Twitter, on Facebook, whatever. At the end of the day, you’ve just got to throw everything at the wall and see what sticks.

For more from Geller, including his long-term goals for the site, read: So What Do You Do, Jonathan Geller, President and Editor-in-Chief of Boy Genius Report?

Which Tweet Wins? See If You Can You Out-Predict A Computer

If you work in social media, or any online media site really, for very long, you learn that it’s hard to predict which post or piece of content will go viral. That doesn’t stop people from trying.

The latest attempt? The New York Times has the details on a collaboration by three computer scientists who developed an algorithm that, with relative accuracy, can tell you which of two tweets to the same content by the same user will more likely be reshared. This is how those developers explain their project:

… [W]e take advantage of the surprising fact that there are many pairs of tweets containing the same url and written by the same user but employing different wording. Given such pairs, we ask: which version attracts more retweets? This turns out to be a more difficult task than predicting popular topics. Still, humans can answer this question better than chance (but far from perfectly), and the computational methods we develop can do better than an average human …

How is that possible? A huge body of data to pull from. In A/B tests, it predicts which tweet will be more popular correctly 67 percent of the time, compared to the 61 percent of tweets more likely to be retweeted that humans guess correctly, according to the NYT. Before you get too depressed, read the full article to see why your computer won’t be replacing you or your social community manager anytime soon.

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Then just for fun: The NYT’s The Upshot takes this idea one step farther and put together this fascinating 25 question gut check to see if YOU can beat their algorithm and predict with more success whether one tweet will go viral or one tweet will go silent.

It’s harder than it sounds! I got 15 vs. the computer’s 19. So what do you get?

Pitch ‘Immediately Engaging,’ Photo-Heavy Pieces to BBC Travel

BBC-Travel-Blog-ImageTop 30 Vacation Spots in America. The 10 Best Places to Visit in Rome. How to Take a Road Trip on a Budget. For travel websites and blogs, it’s easy to use listicles as a way to deliver stories. They’re short, sweet and to the point. However, BBC Travel has a different approach to travel content.

The 3-year-old site focuses on ”stories that are unexpected or surprising, have a timely ‘Why now?’ hook, and weave a strong, context-heavy narrative,” says deputy editor Ellie Cobb. Editors are also looking for visual elements to supplement your story:

Concise pitches that are “immediately engaging” will avoid the editors’ slush pile, and mentioning availability of high-resolution photos will further distinguish a pitch, as editors are commissioning “photo-heavy” pieces, including photo essays that are formatted as slideshows.

Cobb encourages writers with multimedia skills to send queries, too. In particular, she’s eager to consider infographic pitches and videos.

For more on what stories to pitch, read: How to Pitch: BBC Travel.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Philadelphia-Based News Outlet Brother.ly In the Works

cropped-cpij300x100It was a bummer to hear about the shutdown of Digital First Media’s Project Thunderdome in April. But former editor-in-chief Jim Brady is moving onto another local news experiment this fall.

USA Today’s Rem Rieder reported yesterday that Brady will launch a for-profit Philadelphia-centric editorial project called Brother.ly after DFM’s failed attempt at producing community journalism on a national scale.

Brother.ly has a staff of six, which will produce original reporting, as well as aggregate and curate web content. They also plan to pursue partnerships with other local outlets.

The initiative will also be incubated by Temple University’s Center for Public Interest Journalism. Brotherly.ly is intended to replace AxisPhilly, which enjoyed some success but couldn’t be financially sustained.

Read more

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