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Pitch Travel Stories With a Strong Journalistic Hook to Roads & Kingdoms

In a world of listicles and quizzes, Roads & Kingdoms, launched in 2012, seeks to fill a void in travel journalism with a focus on in-depth reporting of destinations. Instead of critiques of new hotels or a roundup of luxe resorts, Roads & Kingdoms delves into the dynamics that affect a region’s culture, politics and economy. It presents travel writing in a more journalistic light. Editor-in-chief and founder Nathan Thornburgh says:

Our target readers are people who are already well traveled and are looking for stories from more distant places they don’t know yet. That, and they like good writing.

Roads & Kingdoms also has partnerships with both Sports Illustrated (for international soccer stories) and Slate (for stories on foreign affairs), so there’s the possibility for freelancers’ work to appear on either outlet in addition to Roads & Kingdoms.

For more information on what editors are looking for in a query, read: How to Pitch: Roads & Kingdoms.

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How Newsrooms Can Cash In Through Events, According to the American Press Institute

eventsrevenueAs many struggling newsrooms — or publications who are at least in a stage of transition — keep thinking of ways to diversify their revenue streams, live events have become a welcome addition to the frameworks of many media companies.

When done right, event production can be a fantastic way to increase audience engagement with current readers, attract and inform new readers and promote the mission and vision of your publication.

And thanks to a recently-published “Strategy Study” produced by the American Press Institute (API), newsroom leaders now have another resource to refer to when pursuing event production.

Using the nonprofit, nonpartisan digitally-native publication The Texas Tribune as inspiration for a successful revenue model (in 2013, the Trib generated more than $1 million from events), the API spent eight months interviewing 19 publishers about how they made journalism events a sustainable, vital asset to their organizations, and to the community around them.

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$5,000 Top Prize for Gannett Foundation’s Al Neuharth Award for Investigative Journalism

Al Neuharth, founder of USA Today.  Photo via mije.org

Al Neuharth, founder of USA Today. Photo via mije.org

The Gannett Foundation’s Al Neuharth Award for Investigative Journalism is seeking investigative reporters who broke ground in the past year. Read more

Friday Link Roundup: Native Advertising and a ‘Cool’ Button

coolbuttonIt’s been a busy week for breaking and on-going news, so why not try to relax this weekend with a little journalist-focused navel gazing?

1) First of all, if you aren’t already hooked on Last Week Tonight, you should get hooked. Not only is it funny, but he rants often about things we care about, most notably net neutrality. This week, it was native advertising. I agree with him — but Digiday says he’s gotten it wrong. I call that “repurposed bovine waste.”

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Does Your Newsroom Throwback on Thursday?

hashtagIn the name of clicks, and appearing to be social media savvy, news organizations have hopped on the #tbt train. For those that live under a rock, #tbt is the hashtag used for “Throwback Thursday,” an excuse to post your prom picture on Instagram, or tweet a link to an old blog post you’re especially proud of.

News organizations have started their own throwback features as an excuse for mid-morning Thursday content. When done well, it works as a good way to get people to dig through your archives or remind people of your authority, as in, “we’ve always covered politics, here’s a piece from 1943 to remind you of our expertise.” Read more

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