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NPR’s ‘Snap Judgement’ Looks for Millennial Support on Kickstarter

Do you want the biggest, baddest season of Snap Judgement ever?  How anyone could resist Glynn Washington‘s request for donations is beyond me.

Washington, the host of the Snap Judgement podcast you can hear on NPR, and his team are trying to attract new audiences and raise funds for their next season. Snap Judgement is one way public radio has reached out to millennials; in their own words the show is about engagement, according to a release about the crowdfunding:

For the past few years, this multi-platform radio show, unlike any others on NPR, has been drawing from across the demographic spectrum.  Storytelling with a beat, the show uses music and video, incorporates live stage productions that sell out nationwide, encourages web downloads, Twitter and interactive dialogue. In short, Snap Judgement is everything public radio is not known for.

Even more interestingly, Washington says in the video that they’re hitting up the audience last in their fundraising. With backing from PRX and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, he ditches the usual public radio drive schtick of: “you owe us, really, for all the good that we do,” and gets right to the point: donate for a t-shirt or concert tickets. Donate because you actually like us; which is what Kickstarter is all about to.

The campaign ends on October 10th and they’re almost at their goal of $150,000 to keep the lights on. If you donate, they’ll produce the “biggest and baddestseason yet. It’s not a bad deal. Especially if you can make public radio cool again (was it ever?).

Storytelling Conference May Have Tips for Digital Pubs

11Interested in how storytelling will continue to take shape online? An upcoming event in New York City called The Future of Storytelling (FoST) Summit is inviting media and technology professionals to gather and learn about innovative ways that stories are being told.

Guests include Ze Frank, president of BuzzFeed Motion Pictures, as well as BuzzFeed’s Jonah Peretti, and Webby Award founder Tiffany Shlain.

The series of workshops and master classes is geared toward filmmakers, communications officers and media members, though I can see how learning about what’s on the cutting edge of “storytelling” — in terms of methods, current trends, and future outlooks — could be extremely useful for product developers, digital editors, and analytics folks at news organizations. With consumption on mobile devices rising exponentially, presenting information and stories in a functional yet efficient way is any media person’s challenge. Apps, data visualizations, video, longform text, infographics, aggregated content — what’s the right way to go?

The FoST event may just have a few answers. FoST is invite-only, but you can follow the discussion on Twitter during the Oct. 1-2 conference here, using the hashtag #FoST.

Gamifying Current Affairs: Al Jazeera Launches ‘Pirate Fishing’ Game

Al Jazeera launched an interactive game this week based on investigating the illegal pirate fishing in the Sierra Leone. Gamers become a reporter, gathering evidence and notes. By watching videos and viewing photos, the “reporter” puts the content in the correct “notebook” and can move up levels.

The game is based on a report called “Pirate Fishing” done by Juliana Ruhfus for the Al Jazeera series People & Power, nominated for the Royal Television Society Awards. An Italian based agency, Altera Studios, partnered with the news organization to create the interactive game, which can be played on a desktop or on mobile. The angle of “building a case” is a nice lesson for younger students or people outside of the field, even; it makes journalism seem adventurous, which it should be. The game focuses on evidence collection, fact checking, and background note taking. Ruhfus is quoted in the release:

Investigative journalism can be seen as quite high-brow, whereas ‘gamification’ can open it up to  a new generation of digital-savvy journalists. It’s important for us to push the boundaries and explore new ways to reach audiences…The game highlights how news stories are created, and the benchmarks needed to qualify your reporting. We’ve been encouraged by the response so far.

You can play the game here.

Matter 3: Big Ideas for Media Focused on ‘Real People’

Last week, Matter’s third round of start-ups demoed their products in New York City. Two were particularly interesting for journos and publishing outlets. First, there’s Stringr, a platform for licensing freelance video content. News organizations can put out a call for content, what kind of shots they need, of what, how long, all of that good stuff. If it’s breaking news, videographers with the app can run out and shoot it. The goal, according to CEO and co-founder Lindsay Stewart, is not only to get the news org the content within an hour, but also pay the freelancer right away.

Organizations pay Stringr, they take a cut, and process payment for the videographer. Another good feature is that it’s not just for breaking news, but also evergreen content for media organizations to browse and use. It’s a much better system than the current one. Right now, they’re live in San Diego, which is kind of a bummer if you’re anywhere else. Stewart says they originally planned to stay out West and push out but that because of the Matter program and contacts, they’ve been talking to newsrooms elsewhere and “are having as many conversations as we can” and might be open to reevaluating their original plan. Here’s hoping.

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New York Times Steps Up Political News Presence

New-York-Times-Logo1Today the Grey Lady launched a politics-themed email newsletter and micro-site underneath the Times‘ main site called First Draft.

First Draft is a piggyback on Washington-centric blog The Caucus, which hasn’t seen much consistent action. As the Times‘ Carl Hulse told the Huffington Post, the new site will house an ongoing political dialogue, written in a similar voice as the paper’s NYT Now app’s morning and evening briefings. Additionally, First Draft will feature both original scoops (that may be developed into full stories for the newspaper later on) as well as aggregated content.

So far, the blog features pull quotes from political figures, videos and even a curated Instagram photo of Cory Booker. Content runs the gamut, as events dictate coverage, though it is definitely an informal take on a sometimes dry topic. As HuffPo’s Michael Calderone wrote: “The Times plans to update First Draft frequently, with hopes that political news junkies will return throughout the day.”

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