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Posts Tagged ‘blogs’

Discover Magazine Launches Citizen Science Salon

citizenscienceIn a week fraught with rethinking digital and mobile content strategies, Discover magazine took a rather classic route in attempting to expand their reach and engage new audiences. They’ve added two new blogs to their site — But Not Simpler and Inkfish — and launched Citizen Science Salon — which includes real, crowdscourced science projects from SciStarter that correlates with articles in the print and digital version of the monthly magazine.

Associate online editor Lisa Raffensperger told me over the phone that the parntership is a natural one: Read more

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Why Are Digital News Orgs Getting Into Print?

print magazinesIn a strange twist of events, popular digital news publishing orgs are starting to put out print magazines as an attempt to earn a revenue and increase brand awareness.

No, it’s not an Onion-type hoax. It’s a true story. Capital New York, a leading political and media news blog, was bought by Politico this fall, and the magazine is the first of many steps to increase — well, I don’t really know what.

According to AdAge, it’s part of Capital’s expansion after being bought by Politico. When you think Washington D.C. news, you think Politico. And they want you to think of Capital when you think of New York. Politico itself announced that it would publish a glossy six times a year and popular music site Pitchfork publishes a quarterly Pitchfork Review, available by subscription or for around $20 per issue.

A quarterly for a music website makes sense in terms of brand and scaling their product. Sort of like McSweeney’s. But Capital will print monthly, with current editors overseeing the content. The first run will have, again according to AdAge:

… a run of about 8,000 copies, the company said, with plans to distribute about 6,000 copies in Manhattan and 2,000 in Albany. Copies will be delivered to the state capitol building in Albany, City Hall in Manhattan and key individuals in the industries Capital New York covers, according to Roy Schwartz, chief revenue officer at Capital New York and Politico.

The magazine will be free, Mr. Schwartz added, with subscriptions available upon request to those who “qualify” based on their job title, job responsibilities, or other criteria.

Doesn’t it just sound like a very labor intensive marketing campaign?

I guess that’s why “digital first” is how we refer to pubs and not digital only. But I’d to find out how effective rags like this can really be in terms of brand engagement and advertising revenue.

Can it be worth the trouble or is this about leftover, hopeful thinking, that a print version will ever make a difference? Tweet your thoughts @10,000Words or share in the comments. 

Boston Review Launches New Site

The Boston Review launched their new website today, and whether you’re a dedicated reader or not, it’s worth a peek.

The magazine has always seen good design as a way to engage to readers. In 2010, they switched from a black and white tabloid to a glossy, full color mag. In print, they wanted it to be beautiful and permanent, according to marketing director Daniel Pritchard, “something our readers could keep on the shelf.”

On the web, “the goal is to engage new readers, so we wanted it to be easily accessible and easier to navigate, expressing the same aesthetic but thinking about the structure very differently,” Pritchard told me in an email. I think those goals are reflected in the new design.

Some features:

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Why You Shouldn’t Ignore FWD, BuzzFeed’s New Tech Vertical

BuzzFeed has launched a new tech vertical, FWD. Yes, it is another tech site to bookmark. Yes, the market is getting pretty crowded with them. But please don’t ignore this new kid on the block.

Here’s why: FWD starts off acknowledging how important the social is. It wants to do more than just share news about Apple and new tablets. FWD is trying to turn the tech news niche into something personal and personable, and perhaps most importantly, social.

“FWD is a way to share things. To pass them on. To nudge the conversation about technology in a different direction–maybe not the next level, exactly, but at least a different one. It’s fundamentally social, which is simply the way more and more of the web works now. Social is the web’s new reality,” the site’s editor, Matt Buchanan, writes in his introduction of FWD. Read more

The Daily Dot Aims To Be The Internet’s Community Newspaper

Let’s face it: the Internet can be a big, scary place, so it makes sense that people seek digital communities where they can congregate with like-minded users to discuss the stuff they care about. Online communities like Reddit and Tumblr frequently develop their own lingo, inside jokes and topics du jour, but these “insidery” snippets often stay confined to the communities from which they sprout. Until now, that is. A new online venture, The Daily Dot, is seeking to bring a voice and platform to the stories for and about online communities.

“The Daily Dot gives a voice to the Web’s communities,” reads the site’s About page. “We report on the most important and relevant topics from within, applying tried-and-true principles drawn from community journalism to the growing cultures of the Internet, and allow our audience to read the Dot across multiple platforms, where they live, online.”

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