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Posts Tagged ‘branding’

Can Netflix-Style Personalization Help Your News Org’s Homepage?

Dynamic_Yield_LogoThis week, Dynamic Yield announced a new personalization feature to it’s “automated real-time customization engine.” It’s a mouthful, but it could mean new things for your homepage.

Using automated A/B testing, the software helps your website offer a super personalized experience for a user based on their habits and clicks on past visits. CEO and co-founder Liad Agmon says that it helps editors solve the problem of deciding what they want users to see (like Vox’s vegetables) and what users usually click on.

Homepages shouldn’t be generic, because the user that comes to a site via a shared link on Facebook is very different from the one who arrives at the homepage through the url, he notes. Why shouldn’t you cater to them? If you know that one user reads long features, but another is just watching your video content, you can also adjust paywalls to be more fair and more attractive to users.

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Your Twitter Chat Is Stressing Me Out

twitter logoTwitter is stressing me out. It all culminated this weekend when I wanted to waste some time on an Amtrak train, but couldn’t focus. The journo chatter was too loud. Jacob Harris seemed to understand me:

But while he seemed ambivalent about the noise, it was making me properly anxious. Not only is the conference streaming in my feed, but then you’re having inter-conference #chats, too. Of course, this could be a personal problem. I’ll disclose that because of some family matters, I’ve had to take a step back from being plugged in 24 hours a day. Since I’m not forced to post, write, or respond to news like I normally do, maybe the noisiness is more obvious to me. I can’t use it right now, therefore it is meaningless. That might be too easy of an out.

The thing is, we journalists talk too much. I like following Twitter chats — #mucked up or #wjchat — until I actually follow them. At some point in refreshing my feed and discerning what you’re trying to say about advertising and wearables in your MT of a RT of an A1 to Q2 I give up and go see what @unfoRETTAble is watching. Read more

Your App is a “Walkie-Talkie” and You Need to Start Using It Like One

docwalkietalkieAs news publishers talk about ‘unbolting’ their digital enterprises and newsrooms work on being more mobile in the name of more engaged with their audiences, it’s hard to imagine what that eventually looks like. To start, it might be helpful not to change our actual news products but focus on new ways of using what we have.

Investing in baby steps, if you will.

That’s what the guys behind the software seem to think anyway. Mag+ is the ‘content publishing ecosystem’ and software behind many of the newspaper and magazine apps you might read — New York Magazine, The Atlantic Weekly, Bloomberg Markets, Chicago Sun-Times, Popular Science, and The Next Web to name a few.

They’ve also just released an upgrade to their software that mirrors some general trends in news publishing. Mike Haney, co-founder and creative director for Mag+, says that the upgrade focused on redesigning the storefront and better sorting, so users know what they have when they want it. They’ve also partnered with eMagazine Insight, so publishers can track the effectiveness of in-app links and banners and hone their marketing campaigns. Most interesting for a mobile newsroom is the take on push notifications and alert channels. Another partner, Appboy, brings custom segemented messaging to Mag+ apps. From their release:

In addition to issues, the app can deliver custom push notifications, promotions, cross app promotions, in-app notifications and news feed items that can be specifically targeted to users based on what they’ve done in the app. Combined with a built-in feedback tool, these features make the platform a more effective communications tool and opens it for a broader range of uses.

It’s just one step in looking at the app as a multi-channeled tool to build better engagement with readers. Haney explains:

We talk about being a content hub. Its not about just designing your issue and pushing it out, but it’s about creating a relationship with your consumer. It’s like a walkie-talkie — you have one in your pocket and they have the other one, and you have the ability to reach out and talk to them and give them control about what they get from you. Read more

CIR Reaches Out To New Audiences With ‘Redaction’ Campaign

CIR_LogoThe Center for Investigative Reporting has launched a re-branding campaign with advertising agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners.

The campaign includes a new logo, along with recent projects like ‘Reveal’,  a one-hour investigative show for public radio, a video game called Hairnet Hero, made to teach children and their families about healthy eating, and celebrated an Emmy win for their graphic novel video ‘Jennifer’s Room,’ for new approaches to journalism.

Not that what CIR does is anything new. They’ve been producing quality, investigative journalism for 36 years, and many outlets, such as CNN and other large organizations, use their research and stories on a regular basis. The problem was that the CIR didn’t feel like they were connecting with the public directly. And so, the campaign.

The pro-bono creative from GSP focuses on the idea of redaction, which is sort of what investigative journalism is all about; filling in the blanks.

Executive chairman, Phil Bronstein, told me over the phone that, “[the idea of] redaction  is something that resonates with people — you don’t have to explain redaction to people. People understand it, especially with things like Snowden and the NSA recently. These are things that are of interest to people, its not just us saying ‘you need to know.’ In the past few decades, there’s been this focus on telling people what to pay attention to, we want to make it easier for people to consume this stuff and understand it.” Read more

Your Tweets Are Not Your Own And You Will Get Fired For Them

I’m shocked that public figures are still getting fired for what they say and do on the internet. Especially people who work in media. Sure, Pax Dickinson, brogrammer extraordinaire, was just CTO over at Business Insider, but this is a publication for the internet and of the internet. Someone there should have told him to put a sock in it — just blocking him is not enough for a news pub.

Gannett’s social media policy was posted on Romenesko yesterday. Perhaps they were shocked, too, and thought it was time for a refresher. Read it. Basically, anything you post can and will be held against you. I think that’s fair policy for media people. The rub for us is that while it’s all held against you, you don’t have the right to remain silent, either.

Like probably having to work weekends and holidays, the lack of delineation between our personal and professional digital selves is part of the job. It’s about being your own brand. From the Gannett policy:

Remember that social networks are forms of public expression and should be used for strategic reasons to enhance your journalism, engage your community of followers, enlighten your news outlet’s audience, and promote your news organization’s brand in a positive way. Like other forms of public expression – attending political demonstrations, voicing opinions on a talk show, making political campaign contributions – they are subject to the limitations that are placed on newsroom employees through the Principles of Ethical Conduct. These are designed to maintain credibility with the reader.

Putting “all tweets are my own” or some spin on that in might help you if you need to make a case for being fired for something you said, but it doesn’t protect you. So use the characters to make your bio more interesting. Especially if you’re employed by a news publication, your tweets are not yours. They belong to the digital strategy and marketing team. Don’t you know that nothing is proprietary on the interwebs?

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