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Posts Tagged ‘data journalism’

Three New Tow Center Reports Out May 30

TowCenter_Horizontal_v5_for_NewsletterIf you haven’t been following along with the Tow Center conference “Quantifying Journalism: Data, Metrics, and Computation” live-stream today (May 30), don’t worry.  You haven’t missed all the good stuff.

Over the weekend, you can back-read some of the fascinating conversations about metrics in the newsroom and sensor and data journalism on Twitter using the hashtag #towtalk.

Plus, be sure to pore over the three research reports highlighting various facets of digital journalism that Tow Fellows are releasing today:

Amateur Footage: A Global Study of User-Generated Content in TV and Online News Output“, by Claire Wardle and Sam Dubberley

Sensors and Journalism“, by Fergus Pitt

The Art and Science of Data-Driven Journalism“, by Alex Howard

The live blog for the conference is worth a gander, too.

Mediabistro Course

Nonfiction Book Proposal

Nonfiction Book ProposalStarting September 4,work with a literary agent to complete a full proposal that wins an agent and a contract! Ryan Harbage from The Fischer-Harbage Agency, Inc. will teach you how to convey your idea in a winning book proposal format, write your proposal letter, understand the nuts and bolts of the nonfiction book industry, and more. Register now! 

ONA Adds Categories for Data, Visual Digital Storytelling To Online Journalism Awards

In it’s call for submissions today, the Online News Association added new categories that recognize some of the biggest areas of digital journalism growth since the awards were first launched in 2000.
ona
Of particular note, the ONA will award new prizes for investigative data journalism and visual digital storytelling. Among other changes, the new Online Journalism Awards categories include:

The University of Florida Award for Investigative Data Journalism — This award, made possible by the estate of Lorraine Dingman, honors work that best features and presents data journalism on digital and mobile platforms. The award will focus on the effectiveness of the data to tell a story, how well the data are presented to users, the journalistic impact and relevance of the data, and the design and functionality of the data presentation. Judges will also take into account the difficulty in acquiring the data. Winners will be asked travel to the University of Florida (expenses paid) to lead full-day workshops.

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European Journalism Centre’s Free Data Journalism Course Starts May 19

"Doing Journalism with Data: First Steps, Skills and Tools" is a free online data journalism course with 5 leading experts.

“Doing Journalism with Data: First Steps, Skills and Tools” is a free online data journalism course with 5 leading experts.

If you’re anything like me, your data skills are rusty (at best). So, when I heard the European Journalism Centre (EJC) was going to sponsor a summer course on data-driven journalism, I was all ears. EJC and its subsidiary Data Driven Journalism recognized a need for a mass learning opportunity when big data is all the rage, and when a limited number of reporters have extensive experience sifting through public records to produce great journalism, like, say, what ProPublica does so well.

I got the email last week reminding me that I had enrolled in the “Doing Journalism With Data: First Steps, Skills and Tools” MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) and am super excited to get started.

The class, intended to teach professional journalists how to interpret data and create data journalism efficiently and effectively, is broken up into five modules which should take about 4-5 hours to complete. The module content is below:

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There’s a Lack of Diversity in New Media Orgs. How Do We Fix It?

peopleThe Internet turned 25 this week and, like most twenty-somethings, still has much to work on, despite its ego. The Internet’s id shows itself in recent conversations surrounding the “new (new) journalism,” and various journalism start-ups. Emily Bell wrote yesterday that these start-ups are far from revolutionary — if only because many of them are founded and fronted by men. Think Glenn Greenwald, Ezra Klein, Nate Silver.

Is this because female journalists are less likely to be plugged as “marquee” writers, as Bell suggests? Or that they have to choose between serving others or being a stand-alone presence as columnist? Or are women simply less likely to apply (remember that Clay Shirky post?).

While I’m glad she brought it up, it’s worth noting that she may be asking the wrong question. There are successful “new” news orgs founded by women and run by them. While Melissa Bell may have, according to Bell’s post, worked in the background at Wonkblog, she seems to have a presence over at Vox — if only because she gets screen time in the launch video. What about Sarah Lacy or Kara Swisher? Vox just poached Eleanor Barkhorn. Read more

Need Data For a Story? You Can Now Buy It From ProPublica

logo-printJournalists writing about health, business and transportation issues can now purchase extensive data sets from independent, nonprofit reporting outfit ProPublica via its Data Store.

Launched Feb. 26, the store allows news organizations and individual reporters to “shop” for research that ProPublica has either been given access to by the federal government through FOI requests, or data resources gathered by ProPublica’s internal team. The site is launching the experiment to see whether the store might add a unique revenue stream to ProPublica.

Let’s say you need some figures on mortality rates along with cause-of-death data: ProPublica will link you directly to the data they have found from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for free (they’re linking from their site to ensure you’re getting the most current numbers). The same goes for data on nursing home deficiencies and documented oil/gas pipeline incidents, which ProPublica also provides links to.

But for the datasets that the investigative journalism provider has collected as a “result of significant expenditures of time and effort,” ProPublica will impose a one-time fee: $200 for journalists and $2,000 for academic researchers.

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