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Posts Tagged ‘interactive’

Best World Cup Coverage Around the Web

nytwc14.jpgIf you don’t have soccer fever yet, I feel sorry for you. It’s the one sport I can actually tolerate, and thanks to an extended overseas stint, know how to watch. With the World Cup playing on every television screen I walk by, it’s hard to not feel like there’s a extended holiday (and if the U.S. advances, it will only get more interesting).

Because I am a soccer geek, I’ve been consuming every bit of content I can find. Explainers that I don’t really need, background on Brazil, and listicles of the most attractive goalies from Ghana to Chile. Here are some of my favorite outlets for the game.

1) The New York Times. The New York Times has made downtime between the noon and three’o'clock games much more informative. Not only is their World Cup homepage clean and easy to follow — you don’t have to fight to find rankings and schedules —  they have great interactives like these diagrams of the clubs that national players come from. There’s also a great collection of essays about how different countries play the game that’s enough to make even the most skeptical soccer fan swoon a little for the game.

2) Vox. True to their mission, Vox does a lot of explaining and curating the World Cup. There’s the primer for those who want to care, but don’t really. And this collection of GIFs that not only shows some of the most popular (or infamous) players, but also has enough stats to fake a conversation with someone about Messi’s performance in past Cups.

3) Slate. By far, I have found myself tweeting and clicking on Slate’s coverage the most. Covering all things cultural surrounding the games, they take taje World Cup to another level with  this explainer about how Mexicans cheer, the ultimate defense of objectifying  soccer players, and my favorite: the Jerk Watch.

How are your favorite news outlets covering the games? Share your favorite World Cup content with me in the comments or @10,000Words.

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3 Ways of Remembering Nelson Mandela Around the Web

Nelson-MandelaWhen a man as inspiring and good as Nelson Mandela passes, it’s hard to do him justice in memorial. Some have tried – with timelines, photo galleries, and interactive spaces where readers can share their memories of him. Here are a few ways the news world is remembering Mandela:

1) The New York Times has a timeline and a photogallery, but my favorite part is the collection of his speeches, arranged by category.

2) The Washington Post and The Guardian, among other papers, opted for a timeline with photos, maps, and depscriptions of life events.

3) The ever visual La Repubblica went with a sleek, easy to navigate photogallery, and, knowing it wouldn’t be enough, added links to other galleries around the web.

Have you seen other tributes you like around the web? Share them in the comments or tweet us with them.

Are ‘Lean-Back’ Apps the Way to Go?

Roy Greenslade at The Guardian recently conducted an interview with Andrew Rashbass, the “chief suit” of The Economist. As the chief executive, Rashbass’ commercial story “turns out to be more of a digital story,” even with their impressive print circulation numbers.

Rashbass draws a distinction between the “lean-back, immersive, ritual pleasure” that comes from reading The Economist in print, to the “lean-forward, interactive” way that people use the website. He was previously in charge of The Economist’s website, and its own research found that readers were eager to build a community and have discussions on the web. Read more

Three More News Projects Covering Bin Laden’s Death

Earlier this week, 10,000 Words’ Jessica Roy brought you the top five explainers for Osama Bin Laden’s death. Today, there a few new projects to add to this historical week in news coverage as the 10-year hunt for the world’s most wanted terrorist comes to a close.

The New York Times’ reaction grid

A brilliantly executed crowd-sourcing project from The New York Times is a reaction grid that lets users click within a quadrant to express how they feel about the significance of Bin Laden’s death. The horizontal axis displays emotional responses (negative and positive) and the vertical axis displays significance (insignificant or significant). Most of the responses, denoted by little black and blue squares, fall into the positive and significant quadrant.

Hovering over the squares also shows you reader comments for people who clicked on that area of the grid. Read more

The best infographics for understanding the crisis in Japan

The tragic earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan last week caused major damage to the nation’s infrastructure and has incited a potential nuclear catastrophe at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant. For those of us who are unfamiliar with the science behind nuclear technology or natural disasters, several news organizations have created infographics that can help provide a better understanding of the complicated events in Japan. Here are the best interactive and informative graphics we’ve come across so far.

1. The New York Times
The New York Times has coupled a number of their stories with interactive graphics that integrate illustration with Google Earth satellite images. The site has published several helpful images, including an earthquake damage map and an explainer graphic on the accident at the nuclear plant.




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