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Posts Tagged ‘New York Times’

Friday Roundup: The Week in Journalism

huffpostAPtweet.jpgIf anyone complained about dog days of summer in the newsroom, this week you got what you wished for. Here are some highlights in all of the chaos that was the news this week:

1) You can’t win if you’re covering Gaza. John Stewart illustrated this best in a skit on Monday night. And the New York Observer called out the New York Times for what it thinks is biased coverage of recent events. The ‘paper of record’ doesn’t think it’s doing anything wrong. What about you? How have you been staying objective — or have you decided to ditch that effort?

BREAKING: Dutch military plane carrying bodies from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash lands in Eindhoven.

— The Associated Press (@AP) July 23, 2014

2) A lot of us need to read slower and learn AP style. On Tuesday, the AP tweeted about a plane carrying the victims of flight MH17. AP style is “crash-landed,” anyway, but a lot of us journos need to slow down. It was like we were waiting to start a fight with them. Read more

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Which Tweet Wins? See If You Can You Out-Predict A Computer

If you work in social media, or any online media site really, for very long, you learn that it’s hard to predict which post or piece of content will go viral. That doesn’t stop people from trying.

The latest attempt? The New York Times has the details on a collaboration by three computer scientists who developed an algorithm that, with relative accuracy, can tell you which of two tweets to the same content by the same user will more likely be reshared. This is how those developers explain their project:

… [W]e take advantage of the surprising fact that there are many pairs of tweets containing the same url and written by the same user but employing different wording. Given such pairs, we ask: which version attracts more retweets? This turns out to be a more difficult task than predicting popular topics. Still, humans can answer this question better than chance (but far from perfectly), and the computational methods we develop can do better than an average human …

How is that possible? A huge body of data to pull from. In A/B tests, it predicts which tweet will be more popular correctly 67 percent of the time, compared to the 61 percent of tweets more likely to be retweeted that humans guess correctly, according to the NYT. Before you get too depressed, read the full article to see why your computer won’t be replacing you or your social community manager anytime soon.

socialprediction_featured

Then just for fun: The NYT’s The Upshot takes this idea one step farther and put together this fascinating 25 question gut check to see if YOU can beat their algorithm and predict with more success whether one tweet will go viral or one tweet will go silent.

It’s harder than it sounds! I got 15 vs. the computer’s 19. So what do you get?

Best World Cup Coverage Around the Web

nytwc14.jpgIf you don’t have soccer fever yet, I feel sorry for you. It’s the one sport I can actually tolerate, and thanks to an extended overseas stint, know how to watch. With the World Cup playing on every television screen I walk by, it’s hard to not feel like there’s a extended holiday (and if the U.S. advances, it will only get more interesting).

Because I am a soccer geek, I’ve been consuming every bit of content I can find. Explainers that I don’t really need, background on Brazil, and listicles of the most attractive goalies from Ghana to Chile. Here are some of my favorite outlets for the game.

1) The New York Times. The New York Times has made downtime between the noon and three’o'clock games much more informative. Not only is their World Cup homepage clean and easy to follow — you don’t have to fight to find rankings and schedules —  they have great interactives like these diagrams of the clubs that national players come from. There’s also a great collection of essays about how different countries play the game that’s enough to make even the most skeptical soccer fan swoon a little for the game.

2) Vox. True to their mission, Vox does a lot of explaining and curating the World Cup. There’s the primer for those who want to care, but don’t really. And this collection of GIFs that not only shows some of the most popular (or infamous) players, but also has enough stats to fake a conversation with someone about Messi’s performance in past Cups.

3) Slate. By far, I have found myself tweeting and clicking on Slate’s coverage the most. Covering all things cultural surrounding the games, they take taje World Cup to another level with  this explainer about how Mexicans cheer, the ultimate defense of objectifying  soccer players, and my favorite: the Jerk Watch.

How are your favorite news outlets covering the games? Share your favorite World Cup content with me in the comments or @10,000Words.

Link Round Up: The Only Things You Need to Read About Jill Abramson and the NYT

timestattooAre you exhausted, too? It’s been over a week and I finally stopped reading every piece of commentary, reporting, and bloviating over Jill Abramson’s termination and the general mess over at the New York Times. How many keys have been clicked over the fate of equal pay and digital innovation? How many hours thumbing through a Twitter feed? A lot. Luckily for you, whether you can’t stop obsessing over it or were too swamped to care, I managed to find a few gems.

Here are the must reads so you can hold your end of a conversation on the matter at your Memorial Day barbeque with all your media minded friends (because you know everyone you know works in the biz, too, right?).

Mathew Ingram over at GigaOM always has good insight on all things digital and in this piece he manages to see a bigger problem below the noise about the executive changes over at the Grey Lady. Conclusion? The Times‘ problems are real, and Baquet likes print a little too much. Now is not the time for nostalgia. Here’s hoping.

And then there was solidarity and humor. Another self described “bossy lady,Kara Swisher, penned a post last weekend about what it means to be a “pushy” woman in media and how the Times bungled the whole ordeal. And this:

Let me see if I can say it more simply than Sulzberger: She was a real pain in my ass and so she had to go. I can relate, to say the least. As one of the few top editors in tech journalism who is a woman and, even from my many years of reporting before that, I cannot tell you the number of times that I have been called a pain in the ass for my aggressive manner. Silly me, but that kind of tonality is exactly what makes for a successful journalist — you know, afflict the comfortable and comfort the afflicted — and what is more often than not needed in the sometimes rough-and-tumble world of media.

Newly appointed editor over at Fusion Margarita Noriega had a reaction similar to mine — and even if you’re sick of reading about Abramson, this (and all of her tweets and tiny posts) are required reading if you want to be my friend. “Hey media, get a clue,” sums everything up. And has good Larry David GIFs.

Lastly, if you insist on delving into it (which is probably a decent idea), read only the analysis by Ken Doctor and the summary of that leaked (printed!) innovation report over at Nieman Lab.

Your welcome. I’m going to take a much needed unofficial start of summer weekend break from Twitter and the future of digital newsrooms, now. I’ve had enough.

Image via The Cut

Save the Date: Social Media Summit in London

socialmediasummitNext Friday, BBC Academy’s College of Journalism, the New York Times, and the Knight Foundation are holding the Social Media Summit 2014 in London. If you are already across the pond or just loaded enough to jet set, it’s possible that you’re still out of luck. Tickets were going quickly.

But you can still follow along using, of course, social media. I’d tune into Twitter around 2pm (UK time) to follow Vivian Schiller’s keynote speech. Earlier in the day, Andy Carvin of First Look Media joins a panel of international journalists to talk about covering world news and using social media to do it better. You can see a full list of speakers and the agenda here. Set the reminders. Next Friday. May 16. #SMSLDN. See you there.

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