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Posts Tagged ‘Nieman Journalism Lab’

Spring Link Roundup: Clickbait, and Other Things We Should Stop Worrying About

springcleaning.jpgNow that we’ve made it through April Fool’s Day and the #HIMYM finale safely, it officially feels like spring. Since nothing is worse than cleaning, spring or otherwise, I prefer to take a long, hard look at my clutter. Whether its three pairs of the same Converse sneaker or media industry fallacies, we need to sort through and keep, throw away, and donate accordingly.

Here are a few ideas circling my Twitter feed that I think we need to deal with.

KEEP: The Idea that ‘Clickbait’ Isn’t a Dirty Word Read more

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Still Making Summer Plans? Deadline Nears For Google’s Journalism Fellowship

It’s the time of year when young journalists start hearing back about their internship applications or perhaps getting worried if they haven’t heard back yet.

googleIf you haven’t already received and accepted an offer and made your summer plans, you still have some time to apply for one of the coolest opportunities available this summer: the Google Journalism Fellowship. But not much time — the deadline is this week.

This isn’t your typical summer internship, though. It’s something more immersive, more data-centric and, honestly, sounds more fun. They’re looking for journalism students who have already demonstrated proficiency and interest in digital projects and technologies, but the desired skills and interests are pretty reasonable for j-school students these days. Here’s how they describe the gig:

The program is aimed at undergraduate, graduate and journalism students interested in using technology to tell stories in new and dynamic ways. The Fellows will get the opportunity to spend the summer contributing to a variety of organizations — from those that are steeped in investigative journalism to those working for press freedom around the world and to those that are helping the industry figure out its future in the digital age. There will be a focus on data driven journalism, online free expression and rethinking the business of journalism.

And they will pay the fellows $8,000 (plus a travel stipend) for 10 weeks, from June through August, to work at one of these journalism organizations:

  • Center for Investigative Reporting
  • Committee to Protect Journalists
  • Investigative Reporters & Editors
  • Nieman Journalism Lab
  • Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project
  • Poynter
  • PRI.org
  • ProPublica
  • Sunlight Foundation
  • Texas Tribune

This application is due Friday, January 31… So, um, why are you wasting time?! Apply here.

Are We Stuck with Hashtags and Like Buttons?

The coverage on Nieman Journalism Lab yesterday of the Engaging News Project pretty much ruined my coffee break as I clicked through the research: there are few things I love more than seemingly wonky research about journalism and democracy. Especially when it’s put in action. Talia Stroud’s research shows, in the most simple explanation, that when you change the language, it can also change how people engage with your website. That should perk most of our ears up. If you want, you can already start making your readers ‘Respect’ stories instead of ‘Like’ them with a WordPress plug-in.

What you can’t make people do, according to her research, is actively seek out information that goes against their views, or their niche. That sounds like old news to me. We’re all in our own little ‘bubbles’ to use Bill Maher’s lingo. That’s bad for democracy, but good for online publishers. It also has something to do with why magazines have fared better in a digital landscape. Chris Hughes of The New Republic spoke to a lot of like-minded, nodding heads this week about how readers (users? can we agree on a terminology?) still look for ‘curated editorial experiences’ whether online or off. That’s something not easy to do with a daily news site, but the goal of most magazines — whether it’s the New Republic or Slate or Field and Stream. 

Apart from saving democracy from ourselves online, the Respect button has my head spinning for another reason. In terms of design and user experience, it’s hard for pubs to break out of the Web 2.0 standards whether it’s about asking readers to like things, comment, or use hashtags. I’m sure there are many strategists and design experts who haven’t slept considering the same things.  I’m not sure if it’s a good thing that everything starts to look the same, all the time. I don’t know for how much longer I even want to ‘like’, let alone ‘respect’ content online, although that’s the formula publications work with to determine all the numbers that make up their bottom line.

Maybe it’s the stormy weather on the East Coast that has me thinking too much about it — but what do you think? If we’ve moved past Web 2.0 and onto the semantic web, how does that affect how we’ll have to start thinking about reader engagement and page design? Is it just that we’ll  be able to better search our hashtags and generate more niche content to read? 

Apply Today For Nieman Journalism Lab’s Paid Summer Internship

If you’re a “well-rounded nerd” with no set plans this summer who wants to write about the future of journalism, consider applying for an internship at the Nieman Journalism Lab.

The lab is offering two full-time, paid 10-12 week summer internships. If you’re interested, however, don’t dally. The deadline is this Friday, March 2 at 5 p.m. Read more

5 Journalism Panels at SXSW Interactive 2012

SXSW Interactive 2012You may remember our post from back in August which featured fifteen journalism-related panels which were up for voting for inclusion into the 2012 SXSW schedule. Earlier this week, SXSW announced their 2012 schedule which includes over 5,000 events in the conference’s film, interactive and music tracks. Some events are still TBA, but the schedule will be updated the closer it moves to the conference’s opening date of March 9, 2012.

Here are just a few of the confirmed panels which should be of interest to journalists. This is a random sample of the entire schedule; you can search the full list of panels on the 2012 SXSW Schedule page.

Read more

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