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Posts Tagged ‘Nieman Journalism Lab’

Link Round Up: The Only Things You Need to Read About Jill Abramson and the NYT

timestattooAre you exhausted, too? It’s been over a week and I finally stopped reading every piece of commentary, reporting, and bloviating over Jill Abramson’s termination and the general mess over at the New York Times. How many keys have been clicked over the fate of equal pay and digital innovation? How many hours thumbing through a Twitter feed? A lot. Luckily for you, whether you can’t stop obsessing over it or were too swamped to care, I managed to find a few gems.

Here are the must reads so you can hold your end of a conversation on the matter at your Memorial Day barbeque with all your media minded friends (because you know everyone you know works in the biz, too, right?).

Mathew Ingram over at GigaOM always has good insight on all things digital and in this piece he manages to see a bigger problem below the noise about the executive changes over at the Grey Lady. Conclusion? The Times‘ problems are real, and Baquet likes print a little too much. Now is not the time for nostalgia. Here’s hoping.

And then there was solidarity and humor. Another self described “bossy lady,Kara Swisher, penned a post last weekend about what it means to be a “pushy” woman in media and how the Times bungled the whole ordeal. And this:

Let me see if I can say it more simply than Sulzberger: She was a real pain in my ass and so she had to go. I can relate, to say the least. As one of the few top editors in tech journalism who is a woman and, even from my many years of reporting before that, I cannot tell you the number of times that I have been called a pain in the ass for my aggressive manner. Silly me, but that kind of tonality is exactly what makes for a successful journalist — you know, afflict the comfortable and comfort the afflicted — and what is more often than not needed in the sometimes rough-and-tumble world of media.

Newly appointed editor over at Fusion Margarita Noriega had a reaction similar to mine — and even if you’re sick of reading about Abramson, this (and all of her tweets and tiny posts) are required reading if you want to be my friend. “Hey media, get a clue,” sums everything up. And has good Larry David GIFs.

Lastly, if you insist on delving into it (which is probably a decent idea), read only the analysis by Ken Doctor and the summary of that leaked (printed!) innovation report over at Nieman Lab.

Your welcome. I’m going to take a much needed unofficial start of summer weekend break from Twitter and the future of digital newsrooms, now. I’ve had enough.

Image via The Cut

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Spring Link Roundup: Clickbait, and Other Things We Should Stop Worrying About

springcleaning.jpgNow that we’ve made it through April Fool’s Day and the #HIMYM finale safely, it officially feels like spring. Since nothing is worse than cleaning, spring or otherwise, I prefer to take a long, hard look at my clutter. Whether its three pairs of the same Converse sneaker or media industry fallacies, we need to sort through and keep, throw away, and donate accordingly.

Here are a few ideas circling my Twitter feed that I think we need to deal with.

KEEP: The Idea that ‘Clickbait’ Isn’t a Dirty Word Read more

Still Making Summer Plans? Deadline Nears For Google’s Journalism Fellowship

It’s the time of year when young journalists start hearing back about their internship applications or perhaps getting worried if they haven’t heard back yet.

googleIf you haven’t already received and accepted an offer and made your summer plans, you still have some time to apply for one of the coolest opportunities available this summer: the Google Journalism Fellowship. But not much time — the deadline is this week.

This isn’t your typical summer internship, though. It’s something more immersive, more data-centric and, honestly, sounds more fun. They’re looking for journalism students who have already demonstrated proficiency and interest in digital projects and technologies, but the desired skills and interests are pretty reasonable for j-school students these days. Here’s how they describe the gig:

The program is aimed at undergraduate, graduate and journalism students interested in using technology to tell stories in new and dynamic ways. The Fellows will get the opportunity to spend the summer contributing to a variety of organizations — from those that are steeped in investigative journalism to those working for press freedom around the world and to those that are helping the industry figure out its future in the digital age. There will be a focus on data driven journalism, online free expression and rethinking the business of journalism.

And they will pay the fellows $8,000 (plus a travel stipend) for 10 weeks, from June through August, to work at one of these journalism organizations:

  • Center for Investigative Reporting
  • Committee to Protect Journalists
  • Investigative Reporters & Editors
  • Nieman Journalism Lab
  • Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project
  • Poynter
  • PRI.org
  • ProPublica
  • Sunlight Foundation
  • Texas Tribune

This application is due Friday, January 31… So, um, why are you wasting time?! Apply here.

Are We Stuck with Hashtags and Like Buttons?

The coverage on Nieman Journalism Lab yesterday of the Engaging News Project pretty much ruined my coffee break as I clicked through the research: there are few things I love more than seemingly wonky research about journalism and democracy. Especially when it’s put in action. Talia Stroud’s research shows, in the most simple explanation, that when you change the language, it can also change how people engage with your website. That should perk most of our ears up. If you want, you can already start making your readers ‘Respect’ stories instead of ‘Like’ them with a WordPress plug-in.

What you can’t make people do, according to her research, is actively seek out information that goes against their views, or their niche. That sounds like old news to me. We’re all in our own little ‘bubbles’ to use Bill Maher’s lingo. That’s bad for democracy, but good for online publishers. It also has something to do with why magazines have fared better in a digital landscape. Chris Hughes of The New Republic spoke to a lot of like-minded, nodding heads this week about how readers (users? can we agree on a terminology?) still look for ‘curated editorial experiences’ whether online or off. That’s something not easy to do with a daily news site, but the goal of most magazines — whether it’s the New Republic or Slate or Field and Stream. 

Apart from saving democracy from ourselves online, the Respect button has my head spinning for another reason. In terms of design and user experience, it’s hard for pubs to break out of the Web 2.0 standards whether it’s about asking readers to like things, comment, or use hashtags. I’m sure there are many strategists and design experts who haven’t slept considering the same things.  I’m not sure if it’s a good thing that everything starts to look the same, all the time. I don’t know for how much longer I even want to ‘like’, let alone ‘respect’ content online, although that’s the formula publications work with to determine all the numbers that make up their bottom line.

Maybe it’s the stormy weather on the East Coast that has me thinking too much about it — but what do you think? If we’ve moved past Web 2.0 and onto the semantic web, how does that affect how we’ll have to start thinking about reader engagement and page design? Is it just that we’ll  be able to better search our hashtags and generate more niche content to read? 

Apply Today For Nieman Journalism Lab’s Paid Summer Internship

If you’re a “well-rounded nerd” with no set plans this summer who wants to write about the future of journalism, consider applying for an internship at the Nieman Journalism Lab.

The lab is offering two full-time, paid 10-12 week summer internships. If you’re interested, however, don’t dally. The deadline is this Friday, March 2 at 5 p.m. Read more

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