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Posts Tagged ‘patch’

Locable Network Targets Entrepreneurial Journalists

locable pic 2Locable, a growing network of 45-plus local community news-oriented websites, is hoping to succeed where other hyperlocal operations have faltered.

The company, started five years ago as an MBA research project out of the University of Washington, differentiates itself from similar hyperlocal operations, such as Patch, by providing a turnkey program for both established and new, owner-operated media entrepreneurs. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Nonfiction Book Proposal

Nonfiction Book ProposalStarting September 4,work with a literary agent to complete a full proposal that wins an agent and a contract! Ryan Harbage from The Fischer-Harbage Agency, Inc. will teach you how to convey your idea in a winning book proposal format, write your proposal letter, understand the nuts and bolts of the nonfiction book industry, and more. Register now! 

Uncertain Future for AOL’s Patch

hyperlocal picBy now, most media pundits and journalism wonks have all but concluded their somewhat premature postmortems on what exactly went wrong at Patch, AOL’s network of local news and information sites.

Although the company’s problems had been mounting for several years, the combination of major layoffs and a recent story in the New York Times that led many to believe Patch was “winding down,” served to put the already embattled company squarely in the media’s cross-hairs. Read more

4 Musts for Doing Quality Online Local News

Given the corporate turmoil and massive cuts playing out before us at AOL’s Patch, I’ve been thinking quite a bit about what went wrong with the local news provider. They had the bodies, tools and platform to do good local journalism, but their model became unsustainable.

I’ve been working for an all-digital local news startup for the better part of a year, and these are a few of the essentials I think must be in place for success on the Web, on the local level. Of course, these notions are based on my own personal experience. Feel free to respond either in favor or against any of my propositions.

Read more

Free Portfolio Service for Affected Patch Staffers

Journalists are good people. Remember the pizzas the Chicago Tribune sent to the Globe newsroom?

In the same vein, I received an email this morning from Marc Samson, founder of Pressfolios. (I have written so much about the digital portfolio site, I’m afraid you are going to start thinking I have stock in the company. Full disclosure: I don’t. They just email a lot.)

The news came down this morning that there are going to be hundred of Patch employees laid off in the coming weeks. That stinks. That also means there are going to be lots of really good journalists looking for work. Samson and his Pressfolio team wanted to spread the word that they’re offering their Pro version for free to any one affected by the slow demise of Patch.

You can contact them directly here to get all of your work archived in one place as you make your way into the job market.

It’s a sort of lemons into tangy lemonade type situation.

Got me thinking: we’ve all been there before. What are your first steps when the ax comes down?

 

AOL’s CEO on Patch, Native Advertising and Why Journalism Won’t Die

This morning, media pros gathered at the Bryant Park Grill for the inaugural “Media Minds” breakfast, featuring Tim Armstrong, chairman and CEO of AOL, and Susan Lyne, the newly installed CEO of AOL’s brand group. Alex Jones, director of the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics & Public Policy at Harvard, moderated the event, which covered everything from women in leadership roles to the Time Inc. spinoff. While the panelists shared many insights, Armstrong’s comments on the future of content were heartening.

While the rise of digital has been blamed for the “death” of journalism, people are still voracious content consumers.  ”Technology changes a lot, but human behavior doesn’t change as much,” said Armstrong. “One of the things that’s most important to [humans] is trusting information.” He cited Google eye-tracking studies that show that, when people search, they immediately look at the URL after seeing a result to asses where the information came from. “Human beings want fast information from trusted sources… trusted brands of information, and I believe trusted brands of information come from powerful sources of people.” That means you, editors and journos. Read more

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