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Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

Which Tweet Wins? See If You Can You Out-Predict A Computer

If you work in social media, or any online media site really, for very long, you learn that it’s hard to predict which post or piece of content will go viral. That doesn’t stop people from trying.

The latest attempt? The New York Times has the details on a collaboration by three computer scientists who developed an algorithm that, with relative accuracy, can tell you which of two tweets to the same content by the same user will more likely be reshared. This is how those developers explain their project:

… [W]e take advantage of the surprising fact that there are many pairs of tweets containing the same url and written by the same user but employing different wording. Given such pairs, we ask: which version attracts more retweets? This turns out to be a more difficult task than predicting popular topics. Still, humans can answer this question better than chance (but far from perfectly), and the computational methods we develop can do better than an average human …

How is that possible? A huge body of data to pull from. In A/B tests, it predicts which tweet will be more popular correctly 67 percent of the time, compared to the 61 percent of tweets more likely to be retweeted that humans guess correctly, according to the NYT. Before you get too depressed, read the full article to see why your computer won’t be replacing you or your social community manager anytime soon.

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Then just for fun: The NYT’s The Upshot takes this idea one step farther and put together this fascinating 25 question gut check to see if YOU can beat their algorithm and predict with more success whether one tweet will go viral or one tweet will go silent.

It’s harder than it sounds! I got 15 vs. the computer’s 19. So what do you get?

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Why Are Only 60% of Journalists on Twitter?

ajr.jpgCan we talk about something? It looks like 2008 is calling and they want their newsrooms back. The American Journalism Review posted a piece this week with the headline “Some Newspapers to Staff: Social Media Isn’t Optional, It’s Mandatory.”

Everyone take a deep breath. It’s not totally ridiculous: The piece, written by Mary Ann Fischer, discusses the various ways newsrooms get editors and reporters on social media, how it’s hard to call it “mandatory,” and how social media guidelines should be “living breathing documents.”

All true.

Also, Dean Baquet hasn’t tweeted yet. But that’s not the worst of it. Fischer writes:

 Nearly 60 percent of journalists were on Twitter in 2013, according to a survey done by Oriella PR Network. San Francisco Chronicle managing editor Audrey Cooper said the lack of social media activity is more pronounced among print journalists. “If you look at your average newspaper editor, they don’t have thousands of followers like the editors of BuzzFeed,” she said. “As a group we tend to have not embraced digital media as much. That’s not good or bad, but it does raise the question of how do you perform in that space if you’re not a user of digital media.”

I just don’t know what to say aside from, hey, print people: It’s time to quit the boycott.

Read more

Los Angeles Times Bets On Social Sharing With Redesign

Screen Shot 2014-05-06 at 5.42.54 PMThe Los Angeles Times‘ website underwent a redesign this week, and the changes included a left-aligned navigation bar, more seamless scrolling movements and “neighborhood” pages. But one of the most significant is the Times’ new story presentation, which pushes social sharing pretty hard.

With their new design, your eye will notice pull quotes alongside the story with a link to tweet that quote and the story’s link. And before you read the story’s first word, you’ll see two or three “sharelines,” pre-written summary sentences for you to share either on Facebook or Twitter. I’m intrigued by this development for a few reasons: Read more

Social Networks and Digital Publishing: Friday Link Round-Up

eulogyfortwitterAh, it’s Friday and finally nice out. Which is why I plan on catching up on all the good links and stories I had to breeze through during the work week. Somewhere outdoors, facing the sun, preferably with a morning coffee. Here are some social media themed links I’ve been thinking about this week; tweet us @10,000Words or comment with articles you think we should catch up on this weekend.

1) I saw that this conversation was going on, but couldn’t bring  myself to get buried in it. Until now. The Atlantic’s ‘Eulogy for Twitter‘ makes some interesting points, though I think media people tend to get caught up, as if Twitter has to be the same for everyone. Maybe it’s just not for journalists anymore, but that’s pretty ridiculous, too.  The point about Twitter a catalyst, like AOL was for email, is something to chew on alongside your Sunday bagel. If Twitter’s dying, someone tell the White House, who is obviously stressing way too much about it.

2) I only log into into LinkedIn when my train’s delayed and I’ve become bored with Twitter (well, now…). I notice that they’ve sent me  a bunch of email notifications,  go in to clean up the mess and see who viewed my profile, as if it were some freemium dating service. But I digress — turns out there are a lot of people like me, which is why this Quartz piece says that LinkedIn is still focusing on being a content site. But a newspaper?

3) I hate to toot our own horn, but this Angela Washeck post on Facebook newswire lays out its plans and asks some good questions. It’s made entirely possible with Storyful, which means, how is it better than Storyful or even a well curated Twitter newsfeed?

So what did we miss out on this week? What are your weekend reading plans?

Image credit: The Atlantic.

Your Twitter Chat Is Stressing Me Out

twitter logoTwitter is stressing me out. It all culminated this weekend when I wanted to waste some time on an Amtrak train, but couldn’t focus. The journo chatter was too loud. Jacob Harris seemed to understand me:

But while he seemed ambivalent about the noise, it was making me properly anxious. Not only is the conference streaming in my feed, but then you’re having inter-conference #chats, too. Of course, this could be a personal problem. I’ll disclose that because of some family matters, I’ve had to take a step back from being plugged in 24 hours a day. Since I’m not forced to post, write, or respond to news like I normally do, maybe the noisiness is more obvious to me. I can’t use it right now, therefore it is meaningless. That might be too easy of an out.

The thing is, we journalists talk too much. I like following Twitter chats — #mucked up or #wjchat — until I actually follow them. At some point in refreshing my feed and discerning what you’re trying to say about advertising and wearables in your MT of a RT of an A1 to Q2 I give up and go see what @unfoRETTAble is watching. Read more

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