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Posts Tagged ‘youtube’

Thrash Lab Makes Captivating Feature Videos

We’ve already discussed how short-form featured videos are changing the landscape of journalism by incorporating virality, but that does not mean that the longform feature video is slowly becoming left in the dust. In fact, many documentary companies are producing shareable, longer form feature videos that are pushing the boundaries of storytelling in the digital era.

One of these companies is Thrash Lab, a California-based documentary team that releases all of its work for free on Youtube. Backed by Twitter god and Two and a Half Men star Ashton Kutcher, Thrash Lab has produced bi-coastal features focusing on people in all kinds of creative fields — but excels in producing clever, slice-of-life views into popular subcultures.

Check out this feature on specialty coffeemakers:

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EmbedPlus Can ‘Enhance’ YouTube Videos for Commentary, Context, Linkage

Here’s a tool to help annotate and direct people to points of interest in any last minute campaign rally videos or the CNN punch-drunkness vids hopefully to come after tomorrow night’s election coverage.

A few weeks ago we highlighted TubeChop as an easy-to-use tool for highlighting parts of a YouTube video relevant to your story. EmbedPlus is another such tool, but with a handful of other additional, useful features.

EmbedPlus, available as a Chrome extension, WordPress plugin and simple wizard, allows you as a journalist to (among other things):

  • Annotate YouTube videos, placing your own text and links (perhaps “explainers” or more context) at designated times
  • Crop videos to the interesting or relevant portions, per the same idea we outlined for TubeChop
  • Mark several jump-to points (“chapters”) relevant to your coverage, so a reader doesn’t have to go searching
  • Provide quick access to conversations (“reactions”) to the YouTube video on social platforms like Reddit and Twitter

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TubeChop for Journalism: How a YouTube Clip-Selector Can Help You (and Your Readers)

My favorite part of the comment section of YouTube is the ability to link a timestamp (say “0:31″) to a particular point in a video, letting someone just click on the “0:31″ in blue and see, in full, the point you’re referencing.

It’s a great way of adding context to your comment, but unfortunately, it currently only works in the comment section itself. Discussing the contexts of a particular moment in YouTube videos, however, can also be advantageous for your journalism.

In my searching for other possibilities to add video context to journalism, I stumbled upon TubeChop—I suggest you give it a try.

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CIR Launches Investigative YouTube Channel

The I Files YouTube channel is now live. The latest multimedia project from the Center from Investigative Reporting combines video from media partners, freelancers and filmmakers to create a hub for investigative video online. (Read our previous coverage). Read more

CIR Launching YouTube Channel For Investigative News Video

The Center for Investigative Reporting will soon have a new way of sharing watchdog journalism with the masses: An investigative YouTube Channel.

The organization announced today that, in partnership with the Investigative News Network, it will use $800,000 from the Knight Foundation to create a channel that will feature video from contributors like NPR, ABC News, The New York Times, Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Center for Public Integrity, American University Investigative Workshop, Independent Television Service and, of course, its own video.

According to a press release, CIR also plans to take submissions from freelance journalists and independent filmmakers.

Social media is a key element of the new project, which CIR and INN will use to engage an audience and promote the journalism.  Read more

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