TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Drew Grant

Roger Ebert Writes Out

romanes-thumb-350x238-17929.jpg

After Roger Ebert recent profile in Esquire magazine, which detailed his many surgeries to fight cancer and has left him unable to eat, drink, or speak, the Chicago Sun-Times columnist and perhaps one of the two most iconic movie critics in the world (the other being his late partner, Gene Siskel) the narrative on the street seemed to be “This is Ebert’s last interview.” Instead, the outspoken writer took to his column today to say that even though several blogs and other outlets have picked up on the “final words” narrative (so to speak), that we’re “all dying in increments” (as Poynter likened its column). Even though he was shocked by the picture of himself used in the Esquire column, with part of his lower jaw missing as he stares mischievously into the camera, he says, “If we think we have physical imperfections, obsessing about them is only destructive.”

Read More: Roger Ebert’s Last Words, con’t. — Chicago Sun-Times, Roger Ebert: The Essential Man — Esquire

Charlie Gasparino Has Great First Day | NBC’s Lame Olympics | Crushin’ On Crushable | Daily News Skims Off The Top

TVNewser: He hasn’t even officially started his new gig at Fox Business News, but Charlie Gasparino got one hell of a scoop today by reporting on Tiger Woods’ return to golf.

Business Insider: NBC has yet to explain why it won’t show any of the Olympic coverage live.

WebNewser: b5Media has launched women’s site Crushable.com with our own ex-editor Amanda Ernst, Erin Carlson (formerly of BusinessInsider), and Jean Bentley.

TheStreet: Finally, some good news for Sirius XM…stocks for the satellite radio company raised above $1 for the first time in two years.

New York Post: Keith Kelly reports: Mort Zuckerman‘s Daily News isn’t exactly overflowing with extra funds. After the 401k program was slashed last year, the newest way to pinch pennies involves salary cuts for anyone getting over $110k a year. At least they still have a janitor.

Scandalous NYT David Paterson Story Not Even About David Paterson

newrrrr.jpg

One day we’ll all look back on the David Paterson/New York Times alleged expose and laugh about how desperate we all were for a juicy story in the middle of a long, cold February. For now though, we’re just trying to piece together how a story about a New York governor’s aide having a sordid history turned into a media spectacle about Governor Paterson having an affair. Here’s what we’ve come up with.

Read more

Data Of People Who Want Free Content Forever Remain Skewed

computer_cash.jpg

See, this is just confusing: Nielsen’s recent survey released Tuesday showed that 85 percent of participants would stop going to a website if it started charging for content. Now, compare that number to 63 percent who responded similarly during a survey by New York Magazine last November or the approximately 50 percent which were discovered by a Boston consulting group. 82 percent seems awfully high, doesn’t it?

Meanwhile, when the question of a pay wall for The New York Times arose, 52 percent of Fishbowlers responded that there’s “no way” they’d cough up the dough. Which seems like a lot, but compare it to that 85 percent and it looks like we’re dealing with a skewed demographic. But the Nielsen study, one of the largest ever created with 27,000 participants from 52 countries, did have some positives. Turns out not all content is created equal, and those surveyed would have a much easier time biting the bullet and paying for movies, games, and other forms of entertainment online than they would for actual news. Because hey, information is free, right?

Between all these studies, only one thing has remained consistent: nobody wants to pay for what the Internet originally promised would be free. They will if they are forced to at gunpoint, or if there is a certain type of exclusive they can’t get anywhere else (and can’t work away the charge), but for the most part, we’re all going to have to be dragged kicking and screaming into this brave new world of paying for your news online.

Read More: Survey: Paying for online content a tough sell — SFGate.com

Previously: FishbowlNY Readers Respond: Split Over New York Times Pay Wall, New York Magazine Poll: Newspapers and New Media Neck and Neck, But No One Willing To Pay, New Yorkers Less Willing To Pay For Content Than Rest of Country

WSJ.Com Snags Washington Post Editor

W11ggSJ.jpg


The Washington Post
lost its Innovations Editor to The Wall Street Journal‘s website today, when it was announced that starting March 15th, Jonathan Krim will be heading over to WSJ.com to take over the position of senior deputy managing editor. (We just hope that title can all fit on one business card.)

Krim’s tenure with the post has lasted for almost 10 years, as he’s moved from a staff reporter on the tech beat to managing editor and director of strategic initiatives. Krim also directed and edited two Pultizer Prize-winning series while working at the San Jose Mercury News.

Read the memo from WSJ.Com managing editor Kevin Delaney after the jump.

Read more

Zachery Kouwe Resigns From New York Times Over Plagiary Charges

kouwe190.jpg

This has not been a good month for looking over your shoulder and copying your classmates work: Just last week, Gerald Posner from The Daily Beast resigned after he was caught by Jack Shafer copying portions of The Miami Herald in his columns.

Now New York Times writer Zachery Kouwe has resigned from his business beat over at the newspaper after it was discovered that his role at Dealbook involved at least six instances of copying of press releases and other news sources word for word.

So what was Kouwe’s excuse for the misdeed? Apparently they keep him so busy at Dealbook that he didn’t have time to realize that he was inadvertently stealing other people’s words.

Read more

Changes At The Gawker Masthead

gawker444.jpg

This week has seen some major changes over at Nick Denton‘s premiere site, Gawker.com. First off: Managing Editor Gabriel Snyder is out after 18 months at the job. In a memo to the staff, Snyder sniffed that he’d be “canned” after leaving the West Coast and writing for The Observer to come work for Denton. Snyder’s replacement will be Remy Stern, the founder of Cityfile.com, which Denton has also acquired. Interesting choice, since Cityfile and Gawker would have at one point seemed to overlap in their respective goals, but as Gawker has widened itself from a New York-centric blog to a more global outreach, Cityfile’s acquisition could represent Denton’s desire to hang on to the old Gawker stake in Manhattan drama. Denton’s official reason for buying up Cityfile was, as he told The Wall Street Journal, “to compete more effectively with reference sites. We and they are in a battle for position in Google search results.”

Meanwhile Weekends Editor Foster Kamer will be leaving his post to take a new position writing with Roy Edroso at The Village Voice‘s Runnin’ Scared blog starting March 1st. Kamer will also be leaving his (week)day job of associate editor at BlackBook. Foster announced his departure on Twitter, claiming it had nothing to do with Snyder being fired and we believe him…we’ve been hearing rumors of The Voice not-so-subtly courting the 25-year old wunderkind for weeks now.

Read More: Gawker Finds Itself in the Spotlight — Wall Street Journal

Fishbowl Newstand: Your Morning At A Glance

pater111son.jpg

Tracy Morgan On Letterman| McClatchy Bucks The Trend | Bayh-be, Bayh-be Not | Teaching Old Media Dogs New Tricks | Wired Vs Weird

Huffington Post: Tracy Morgan continues to battle Joaquin Phoenix for craziest talk show guest in history award.

Editor & Publisher: McClatchy is expanding its Sunday Select program so more non-subscribers can read its newspapers for free.

New York Observer: Condé Nast, MTV rebrands. A sign of the times?

TVNewser: What should be Evan Bayh‘s next career move? Voe here.

FishbowlLA: Sarah Silverman versus Wired‘s TED conference organizer Chris Anderson in a Twitter flame war? Lets all meet behind the school after math class and watch them fight!

Will Magic Johnson Buy Ebony And Jet Publisher?

Magic-Johnson-smiling.jpeg.jpg

Rumor of the day: Magic Johnson, retired NBA superstar and mogul is in talks to buy Johnson Publishing Co., producers of African-American magazines Jet and Ebony. There were whisperings last year that Ebony may have been up on the auction block (publisher Kenard Gibbs bowed out in 2008), but considering that Jet rolled out a new redesign just two weeks ago, Johnson is doing everything in its power to make their titles look salable.

This new rumor about Magic buying the paper can’t hurt (the company wouldn’t even need to change its name!): According to Bloomberg News, it’s Magic’s group that issued the statement “There’s no definitive agreement,” while Johnson CEO Linda Johnson Rice said she has never even had a discussion about Magic Johnson buying the publisher. Interesting power play…you’d think Johnson Publishing would be eager to see Magic’s name attached to its title.

Read More: Magic Johnson in Talks to Buy Publisher of Ebony, Jet Magazines

Previously: Is Ebony For Sale?, JET Magazine Rolls Out Redesign, Kenard Gibbs Out as Publisher of Ebony, Jet

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>