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New York Times Readers’ Reactions to Bin Laden’s Death by Gender and Nationality

The New York Times posted an interactive graph that allowed visitors to plot their feelings on Osama bin Laden‘s death with one axis going from “Negative” to “Positive,” and one from “Insignificant” to “Significant.”

Dan Nguyen put the 13,000 responses the Times received through a partway scientific analysis. His methodology:

I used Google Refine to quickly sort out the geographic locations (which varied from zip codes, to city/state, to neighborhoods, such as “Upper East Side”). Gender was not a checkbox in the NYT’s form, so I used Refine to sort based on first names.

The (again, partway scientific) result: female and non-U.S. Times‘ readers were more ambivalent to the news of bin Laden’s death.

The 260 non-U.S.-female respondents averaged a 43 in positivity, which is a whole step below the average female response. U.S. females (2,270 of them), averaged a 52, compared to the 6,059 U.S. males who averaged a 65.

That comes out in line with our expectations. A table of the results (with breakdowns also by U.S. cities) is after the jump.

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