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A Big Mess at Louise Blouin Media

New York Post media reporter Keith J. Kelly has been doing a great job of documenting the ongoing turmoil at Louise Blouin Media.

LouiseBlouinMediaLogo

His latest dispatch re-affirms payment delays faced by various domestic and foreign freelancers, and highlights two major recent defections:

Art + Auction senior editor Julie Baumgardner was working late one night when water started dripping from the ceiling, sources told Media Ink.

“The next morning the whole office was flooded, and it sat like that for weeks, as Louise would have to pay to have it cleaned,” said a source. “The staff cleaned it up, but it was there so long mold appeared everywhere, and they had to evacuate. Julie walked out in early May over the issue. She just got up and left.”

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Reuters Signs Syndication Deal with Variety

Reuters is teaming up with Variety for all its entertainment news. Reuters had previously partnered with a few different outlets for syndicated entertainment content.

The deal involves Reuters, Variety and VarietyLatino.com.

“Reuters is committed to providing our customers around the world with real-time, high impact multimedia news,” said Daniel Mandell, Reuters’ senior VP of business development, in a statement. “As a leading provider of quality entertainment news, Variety and Variety Latino are natural partners to help Reuters deliver unparalleled entertainment coverage to our clients.”

You can expect to see Variety’s editorial content popping up on Reuters starting in August.

Gawker Media ‘Kegerator’ Has Its Own Website

JoyrideKegeratorThere’s an interesting factoid in the latest bit of press for Queens-based and now bi-coastal company Joyride Coffee Distributors. According to freelance Post contributor Maridel Reyes, employees at one NYC media company have the option of making sure – before they get out of their chair – that a trip to the iced cofee “kegerator” will be worth the walk:

Joyride’s first kegerator was installed at Gawker last May — and the media company’s kept it ever since. It even maintains a website where workers can check if the keg is empty or not.

The list of media companies running on Joyride coffee is long and impressive. Besides Gawker, their product adorns the offices of Twitter, BuzzFeed and Mashable.

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Joe Ripp Rings NYSE Opening Bell

Here’s Time Inc.’s CEO, Joe Ripp, ringing the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange this morning. Have you ever watched one of these things? Here’s a quick breakdown: Everyone stands around as a bell is rung a few times, and then they clap and clap and clap. The end.

Time Inc. is now being traded as TIME. As of now, shares have dropped almost five percent, to $22.43. It’s going to be a long week.

Modern Farmer Founder Explains How She Connected the Dots

On May 29, Modern Farmer, a quarterly print magazine and website based in Hudson, New York, published the following articles:

Successful Game Developer: ‘I Owe it All to My Goats’

The Food Politics of Pokémon

These BuzzFeed-like items, suggests Business Insider technology beat writer Dylan Love, are perfect examples of how Modern Farmer has carved out content success. Founder-EIC Anne Marie Gardner and her crew are also riding high following their recent win at the 2014 National Magazine Awards. She tells Love how she came to this farm-to-table, “agricultural lifestyle” content nexus:

“I connected dots that weren’t connected before. I had covered travel, health, and beauty trends for [a magazine called] Monocle in my former life, and when you’re writing about trends, you get trained to see what’s coming.”

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Now Independent, Time Inc. to Cut 25 Percent of Editorial Costs

Time Inc. is officially its own company now, and with that, comes many questions. Is it smart to continue the print edition of Time? What about People? And if People — Time Inc.’s money maker — can’t produce, what hope do other titles have? Also, what about that $1.3 billion in debt? According to The New York Times, the publisher at least has an answer to that one — cutting editorial costs. By a lot.

Last week, Time Inc.’s execs met with editors and asked them to begin the process of cutting 25 percent of editorial spending. That means staffing cuts are coming by the bunches. “In almost every meeting with investors and employees, he [Time Inc.'s CEO Joe Ripp] reminds them that he is constantly reviewing staffing levels,” reported the Times. Hanging the hand of death over staffers is surely going to create a nice working environment.

Not that staffers are the only ones who are worried about the cuts. Ripp has told Time Inc. senior managers that it’s all on them to save their magazines. “I can’t fix it,” Ripp said, in meetings. “You have to figure out a way to fix it.” That, of course, brings up one more question — how do you make repairs with a half-empty toolbox?

Time Inc. Once Owned a Forest

Time Inc. is officially splitting off from Time Warner today, so we thought it’s the perfect moment to remind everyone that the publisher once owned a forest. Yes, as in that place with trees and grass and stuff.

According to Ad Age, in 1952, Time Inc. purchased a wooded area in Texas because executives “figured they’d benefit from owning the very trees required to print magazines like Time, Life and Fortune, and they got a kick out of the way east Texans did business.”

Of course all good things — and dumb things — eventually come to an end. In the early ’80s Time Inc.’s execs came to their senses and spun the forest product company off.

Here’s hoping the next chapter of Time Inc.’s life includes at least one more odd purchase. Perhaps a windmill?

Time Inc. Buys Technology Company Cozi

Time Inc. will spin off from Time Warner this Friday, but before then, the publisher has a bit of news: It is buying Cozi, a Seattle-based tech company. Cozi creates digital organization products and apps for families. Its most popular product is the Cozi Family Organizer.

In an email to staffers notifying them of the purchase, Time Inc.’s CEO and executive vice president, Joe Ripp and Evelyn Webster, respectively, described the move as “a strategic fit on many levels.”

Because we know you’re wondering, here is Ripp and Webster on those levels:

First, its digital tools naturally align with the more than 53 million families we reach every month. We look at this as an attractive opportunity to combine content from our brands like Real Simple with these interactive tools and products, ultimately giving us a much deeper level of engagement with this important audience. We also believe that Cozi’s organizational products can be applied more widely across our portfolio of brands—imagine the possibilities if we offer travel buffs, sports enthusiasts, or food lovers tangible digital and mobile tools to organize their activities combined with deep, relevant content.

Nightline Pays a Visit to BuzzFeed Video HQ

In lieu of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, think of BuzzFeed’s Los Angeles office on Beverly Blvd. as the equivalent of Ze Frank and the Viral Factory. Into which, for Nightline, dropped Nick Watt.

In addition to executive VP of video Frank [first name pronounced ZAY], other BuzzFeed staffers featured in the piece include video fellow Keith Habersberger, senior video producer Jeff Rubin and junior video producer Andrew Ilnyckyj. All possessors of what the ABC reporter deems to be “Sissyphian minds,” constantly looking to take intelligent risks in pursuit of one-million-plus-views vids.

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Condé Nast Drafts Native-Ad Conflict Resolution Doc

CondeNastLogoThe brave new world of native advertising has an intriguing road map. Per Ad Age‘s Michael Sebastian, senior editorial staff at Condé Nast are currently reviewing a 4,000-word draft document:

The document’s aim is to give publishers and editors who might clash over native ads a quick reference guide to solve any disputes, the executives say. “There are things in there editors won’t like, and things in there that publishers won’t like,” one editor said.

Another one of Sebastian’s sources for the article gets a little bit ahead of proper native context by comparing the document to the Great Charter of the Liberties of England, sealed under oath by King John in 1215. Describing the Condé Nast document as “a Magna Carta for native ads” is hilariously grandiose.

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