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Archives: December 2009

New York Times Crowdsources Readers’ Photos For A Decade Of Images

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Because there is such a thing as a free lunch, as long as you promise that your meal will be featured in The New York Times: “Documenting The Decade” is the NYT’s interactive photo gallery of over a hundred pictures taken this decade, none of them by New York Times paid photographers.

Instead, the Times asked readers to submit their photos and built an interactive player so you can see when people took the most photos in the past ten years (September 11 is neck-and-neck with Obama’s Presidential win, but it’s really this year’s Hudson River crash and the Inauguration that spiked this nation’s shutterbugs).

Each photographer gets a photo credit and a little blurb about their picture, but we wonder the relative merit of just giving your pictures to a major news org so they can do a round-up without having to shell out a dime to the individuals who actually did the work for this piece. Citizen journalism in the making!

Read More: Documenting The DecadeNew York Times

How Citizen Journalism Helps A Story Live On

Gaines_Jim.jpgAs we cover the media trends we’re looking forward to in 2010, today we’re focusing on citizen journalism and crowdsourcing — two similar concepts that promote engagement between reporters and people involved in the stories they’re covering.

To get us started on this topic, we spoke to Jim Gaines, the former managing editor at People, Time and Life magazines and current editor-in-chief of digital publication FLYP, about the possibilities of citizen journalism and the future of journalistic storytelling.

Gaines is a big proponent of using journalism to start a conversation, and using collaboration from readers to continue that conversation and coverage of a story. Although his own pub FLYP doesn’t have the infrastructure in place yet to accomplish his vision, Gaines thinks collaboration is the wave of the future.

“I think 2010 is going to be enormously important as a turning point for digital publishing in general, citizen journalism in particular, because the facility — and by that I don’t just mean the software and hardware, I mean the culture and other supportive elements — are just getting into place,” Gaines told us.

“Google Wave is a wonderful example of a collaboration, but there are so few people on it that it has no scale. I think that it is an interesting model for the storytelling of the future, which is not going to be a one-way story told. A story is going to be the beginning of a conversation and that story will be modified by the conversation that follows. I don’t know exactly what that model is going to look like because the experimentation is only beginning. But it’s very exciting.”

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Times Square Bomb Threat Leads To Condé Nast Evacuation

We didn’t know anyone was actually working this week, but anyone who decided to go in to Condé Nast‘s Times Square headquarters today got a nasty surprise.

A suspicious looking van caused a bit of a bomb scare near the site of the New Year Eve ball drop today, and workers from a few buildings — including Condé Nast’s building and NASDAQ’s HQ — were reportedly asked to evacuate into the freezing cold.

New York police later gave the all clear after the van was discovered to only contain clothing, The New York Times reports.

Police Find Only Clothing in Abandoned VanNew York Times

The Year In Citizen Journalism Heralds Next Year’s Trend

usairwaves.jpgYou might say that the impact of “citizen journalism” on 2009 started with US Airways Flight 1549 crashing into the Hudson River, and the pictures of the plane hitting Twitter before any news outlets had them. And of course the role that Twitter played in helping Americans find out about protests in Iran after its election, proving that the micro-blogging tool could be used for something other than hourly updates about mundane activities. It may have peaked with MissTearah and the Fort Hood shootings, when news outlets realized that you can’t trust eyewitness accounts for your entire network of information.

But if all we had to go on was Twitter, than it would be the Year of Microblogging. Some consider bloggers to be citizen journalists because they work outside the spectrum of traditional news organizations, with all the pros and cons that it entails. Below, we take a look at what citizen journalism in 2009 might mean for the New Year.

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Remembering The Year That Was: FishbowlNY Editor On The Menu

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FishbowlNY editor Amanda Ernst visited the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast today, joining hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven to discuss the biggest media stories of 2009.

On Amanda’s list: stories about layoffs and magazine closings, but good news of circulation revenues climbing at places like The New York Times. Also, announcements of new magazine launches, like Afar and new Web sites, including Atlantic Wire, Mediaite and HollywoodLife.

Also discussed: the biggest stories of the year covered by the media — Balloon Boy, Michael Jackson and Tiger Woods among them — and how the media’s coverage has changed.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

Carl Kasell’s Last NPR News Broadcast Today

ckasell.jpgNPR‘s Carl Kasell will broadcast his last “Morning Edition” this morning.

In advance of wrapping up his newscasting job, Kasell, who first anchored “Morning Edition” in 1979, talked to co-host Renee Montagne about his career and upcoming plans. Although he will be leaving the morning news show, he will continue to emcee and judge NPR’s quiz show “Wait, Wait…Don’t Tell Me!” among other duties for the non-profit radio network.

“I hear the word retirement a lot concerning my current situation, and the only thing I’m retiring is my alarm clock,” Kasell said. “No longer will I hear that clock go off at 1 o’clock in the morning, or five after one, as I like to say, because I like to sleep in.”

Interesting fact: about 2,000 people have Kasell’s voice on their answering machine.

Listen: Carl Kasell: After 30 Years, A Chance To Sleep In –NPR

Previously: After 30 Years, NPR’s Kasell Retires From Newscast –FishbowlDC

(Photo by Antony Nagelmann via NPR)

Year-End Condé Nast News: Subpoenas, Ad Sales Concessions, New Project

4 times square.jpg2009 was a difficult year for Condé Nast, one of the big magazine publishers based in New York. Things got so bad for the company, it hired infamous consultants McKinsey & Co. to come in and look over its books, eventually slashing budgets by about 25 percent across the board for 2010 and scuttling six pubs before the year was out. Since it’s a large industry leader, media watchers look at changes at Condé Nast as indicative of the sector — so after a tough year good news for Condé might mean good news for the rest of us.

First, the publisher seems to be (finally) recognizing that its bread and butter, luxury advertising, has taken a nosedive in recent years. Mediaweek reports today that Condé Nast has been giving more concessions to advertisers for the coming year, including seeking only a 2.5 percent increase in CPM rates, when it had customarily sought 5 percent.

Today also brings news that Condé Nast is seeking subpoenas of Google and AT&T in an attempt to gather info about five hackers who allegedly accessed the company’s computer network earlier this year, publishing content from men’s magazine GQ before the pub hit newsstands. The subpoenas are the latest in the publisher’s copyright infringement suit against the hackers, The New York Post‘s Keith Kelly reported.

And in other news, FishbowlNY has heard from various sources within Condé that the company’s Fairchild Publications division is working on a new men’s wear publication. This new pub comes just over a year after the company shuttered men’s wear trade DNR and its monthly sister pub Menswear, folding them into WWD. When Condé Nast starts launching publications instead of folding them, it’s good news for everyone.

Condé Nast Gets Flexible With 2010 Ad ConcessionsMediaweek

Condé subpoenas Google, AT&T in hacker fightNew York Post

The FishbowlNY Newsstand: Your Morning Glance

10 Things You Need To Stop Tweeting About

The Oatmeal (a.k.a. Matthew Inman) created a highly informative comic about the Tweets that must end.

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View the full list of Twitter sins here.

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Puppy Snooki Punch

What happened to Snooki was NOT FUNNY. But this re-enactment totally is.

Previously on FBLA:
MTV Develops A Conscience

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