FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Arthur Sulzberger Jr’

Times Company Sells Regional Media Group for $143 Million

The deal between The New York Times Company and Halifax Media Group that was leaked last week is now complete. The Times Company will sell its Regional Media Group, which consists of 16 regional papers, to Halifax for $143 million in cash. Why cash? We’re not sure. Maybe Arthur Sulzberger Jr. is planning a Vegas bash to escape the flak he’s catching and needs some cash for the casinos and… other entertainment venues that require cash.

A memo from the Regional Media Group announcing the deal was obtained by Jim Romenesko. It stated that staffers will find out their fate within 48 hours, and that “Halifax has decided who it will hire.”

Sulzberger, in a statement about the deal, attempted to praise the 16 papers no longer under the Times Company’s umbrella. He called them, ”trusted institutions in their communities.” Just not trusted enough to keep around.

New York Times Union Letter at Over 270 Signatures

The open letter sent by the New York Times’ union to Arthur Sulzberger Jr., protesting the recent moves that he has made, now has over 270 signatures. The letter, which can be viewed here, is currently endorsed by 272 Times staffers, including Howard Beck, Jeremy Peters, Andy NewmanGinia Bellafante and many more.

Bill O’Meara, the president of the union, told The Huffington Post that it could have been worse. “There were people who wanted to storm Arthur Sulzberger’s office,” said O’Meara. “There were people who wanted to stage a walkout.”

O’Meara said that plans to issue the letter and the signatures to Sulzberger at the end of the week, and he will also be publishing some searing comments the staffers made, if given permission. We’re sure those will make for a juicy read.

Newspaper Guild Writes Open Letter to Arthur Sulzberger Jr.

Just like we thought, the Newspaper Guild of New York has something to say about recently departed New York Times Company CEO Janet Robinson getting her full pension two years before she was eligible to get it. The union published an open letter to Arthur Sulzberger Jr. demanding that if Robinson was getting her pension, then he should drop the pension freeze on all guild members.

A note announcing the union’s position begins, “The last 24 hours have brought stunning news about several recent decisions by Arthur — moves that have angered and dismayed those of us who work for the Times and care about its direction.”

The entire letter is available below and at Saveourtimes.com.

Read more

Janet Robinson’s Total Severance: $15 Million

Despite not being eligible for her New York Times pension benefits for another two years, Janet Robinson got paid the full amount — about $10.9 million — as part of her severance package. That’s in addition to the $4.5 million “consulting fee” she’s getting paid next year.

According to Reuters, the latest rumor explaining why Robinson suddenly left the Times is that Arthur Sulzberger Jr. didn’t like how much she was putting herself in the spotlight lately; sources said that Sulzberger saw it as “an unwelcome power grab.”

Hopefully that’s not the real reason. One would think that Sulzberger is a little more confident in himself than to let something like that get in the way of what was a great business relationship. The Times was doing well under their collective guidance, it’d be a shame if that’s all it took to end it.

Read more

New York Times Company CEO Janet Robinson Stepping Down

Breaking: The New York Times CEO and president Janet Robinson is stepping down from her post at the end of the month. The Times reports Robinson will be replaced on an interim basis by publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr.

“It is with mixed emotions that I write to let you know that I am retiring from the New York Times Company,” Robinson told staffers in an email, The New York Times reports.  

Sulzberger will serve as chief executive, while Robinson, 61, will stay on with the Times as a paid consultant for one year.

The company said that it would begin an internal and external search to find a new chief executive.

Robinson joined The New York Times Company in 1983, becoming CEO in 2004.

Along with The New York Times, the company owns The Boston Globe and The International Herald Tribune.

Martin Nisenholtz Departs The New York Times After 16 Years

(Via paidContent)

Martin Nisenholtz, a New York Times Company veteran and digital media pioneer, is retiring at the end of this year. Media Decoder reports that in a memo announcing the newsArthur Sulzberger Jr. and Janet Robinson explained just how important to the paper Nisenholtz has been.

When he joined in 1995, the Times’ website “had zero web page views,” stated the note. “Indeed, we had zero web users. Further, we had no web revenue. Today thanks in large measure to Martin’s vision and leadership, our digital numbers are dramatically different.”

Moves are expected to be announced soon in order to restructure things after Nisenholtz leaves.

The New York Times Repays Debt to Carlos Slim

Maybe things aren’t so bad for The New York Times after all. Today the Times said it is repaying its $250 million debt to Carlos Slim, three and a half years early. Slim lent the money to the paper a few years ago when things were especially bleak for the Times.

According to memo from Janet L. Robinson and Arthur Sulzberger Jr., the paper was able to pay the debt back so quickly because of a series of moves (like selling most of its stake in the Boston Red Sox) that have given the Times new life:

Our ability to pay down this debt at this time is directly linked to the decisive steps we have taken to improve our financial flexibility over the past two years. We remain focused as we move to the next phases of our business plans and as the uncertain global economy and the ongoing volatility in our industry continue. But today we take pride in this moment.

Arthur Sulzberger Jr. Purchases Upper West Side Penthouse for $3.9 Million

Arthur Sulzberger Jr., Publisher of The New York Times, has purchased a three-bedroom penthouse on the corner of 71st and Broadway for $3.9 million. The building is called The Dorilton, and if you Google pictures of it, you’ll see why Sulzberger considered it a worthy place to live.

The New York Observer has some more details:

The pinched penthouse has a modern feel with an unusual 25-foot pyramidal skylight that lights up at night and has more of a David Pogue feel to it. There is also a huge terrace almost as big as the six-room spread.

The moral of the story is that if you’re rich, you get to live in castles.

Why did Bill Keller Resign as The New York Times’ Editor?

The announcement today that Bill Keller would be replaced by Jill Abramson as Executive Editor at the New York Times was something of a bombshell. Keller, it seems, has been achieving a higher and higher profile lately with his columns for the Times. So what’s the story behind this? The official statement is that Keller stepped down, and his boss Arthur Sulzberger Jr., the paper’s publisher, accepted his resignation “with mixed emotions.” But is there more to it than that?

Hamilton Nolan at Gawker speculated:

The official word is that this was completely Keller’s decision, and “with a formidable combination in place to succeed him, he felt it was a good time to step aside.” Fine. Could be the truth, and that’s it. Then again, could be more to it. The NYT may very well have another round of newsroom cuts coming down the road—declining print ad revenue will not be replaced by online ad revenue (or paywall revenue), so eventual cutbacks are inevitable. Keller’s already presided over one major round of newsroom layoffs. Maybe he just didn’t want the heartache of doing another

Another question is: how long has Keller wanted to leave? In a recent Esquire interview with Keller, it seems that he may have thought he would be working the job for much longer.

Read more

Bill Keller Steps Down as New York Times Editor

Bill Keller is stepping down as Executive Editor of the New York Times to become a full-time writer for the paper. He will be replaced by Jill Abramson, who has been managing editor since 2003. Abramson will be the first woman to be editor in the paper’s 160-year history.

Dean Baquet, the Washington bureau chief, will become the new managing editor. The Times reports that:

Mr. Keller, who ran the newsroom during eight years of great journalistic distinction but also declining revenue and cutbacks throughout the industry, said that with a formidable combination in place to succeed him, he felt it was a good time to step aside…

As for Mr. Keller’s plans, he said he was still working out the details of a column he will write for the paper’s new Sunday opinion section, which will be introduced later this month. He did rule one project out. “I won’t be writing a book about The New York Times,” he said.

Arthur Sulzberger Jr., the paper’s publisher, said he accepted Mr. Keller’s resignation “with mixed emotions.”

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>