TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Committee to Protect Journalists’

Committee to Protect Journalists Rejects Call for Event Chair Resignation

There was a bit of an overseas ruckus ahead of tonight’s International Press Freedom Awards dinner in New York City, during which the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) will honor four courageous reporters.

DanielLDoctoroffYing Chan, a Hong Kong journalist and professor who was celebrated at the same annual dinner 15 years ago, called on event chairman Daniel Doctoroff, CEO of Bloomberg L.P., to resign from that post. He feels that it is hypocritical for the exec to oversee the event given recent reports of Bloomberg allegedly killing a big China enterprise story out of fears it would anger the country and the related November 13 dismissal of Hong Kong Bloomerg reporter Michael Forsythe.

ChinaFile reporter Emily Brill got this statement from the CPJ:

Sandra Mims Rowe, chairman of the CPJ Board of Directors, declined to be interviewed, as did CPJ executive director Joel Simon. Rowe issued the following statement:

“I chair the CPJ board of directors and have heard from several board members that you are trying to draw a connection between Dan Doctoroff chairing the Press Freedom Awards banquet and Bloomberg’s handling of the recent China stories. I can speak for CPJ. This is a false linkage. We are pleased to have Dan Doctoroff as chair of the event and we look forward to a successful banquet Tuesday.”

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Starting August 18, learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career in our online boot camp, Freelancing 101! Through a series of weeklong webcasts, you'll hear from freelancing experts who will teach you the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and securing new clients. Register now! 

2012 Top Three Worst Years for Journalist Deaths

With two weeks left in 2012, the year has already made its mark as one of the worst years ever recorded for journalist deaths. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) annual report on media professionals killed while working, 67 have died this year; the third highest number since the study began in 1992. The worst year for journalist deaths was 2009, when 74 were killed.

The CPJ says that the high number of deaths — a 42 percent increase compared to 2011 — is directly related to violence in four countries: Syria, Somalia, Pakistan and Brazil. Syria was by far the deadliest assignment for journalists, as 28 were killed while working there. Somalia was the second worst with 12 deaths, followed by Pakistan with seven and Brazil with four.

The one bright spot to emerge from the CPJ’s report was that for the first time since 2003, no journalist deaths occurred in Iraq. But as we said, there are still two weeks left in the year.

Number of Imprisoned Journalists in 2011 a 15 Year High

(Via CPJ)

According to a new report by the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), the number of imprisoned journalists in 2011 was the most since 1996. As of December 1, there were 179 writers, editors, reporters and photographers behind bars, a 34 percent jump from last year.

While jailing declined in the Americas and in Europe, that figure was squashed by the Middle Eastern and North African regions, which accounted for almost 50 percent of the yearly total. Iran put 45 journalists behind bars alone, making it the worst region in the world for imprisonments.

Other trends:

  • 78 freelance journalists were jailed, which was the biggest year-to-year jump in the survey in ten years
  • For the first time in over a decade, China didn’t lead or co-lead the list
  • A majority of jailed journalists were local, being detained by their own governments

For more, check out the full report here.

2009 Deadliest Year For Journalists

Here’s an end-of-the-year story we wish we didn’t have to report.

The Committee to Protect Journalists said yesterday that 2009 was the deadliest year for journalists around the world. CPJ’s tally rose to 68 this year, thanks in part to a massacre in the Philippines last month.

Reports Reuters:

“The press freedom group said the 2009 tally compared to 42 deaths in 2008 and surpassed the previous record of 67 deaths in 2007 — when violence was at its worst in Iraq, which had been the deadliest country for journalists for six years.”

The Philippines massacre, which caused 31 journalists’ deaths, helped make the island nation the deadliest country for journalists this year. Iraq was the third deadliest country, holding the lowest annual total for journalist deaths since the U.S. invaded the country in 2003. Somalia was number two.

Lists and statistics like this give new meaning to all those things that we have to be thankful for as we head into the New Year.

Journalist deaths hit record in 2009: report –Reuters

Journalists: Do Not Criticize the President in UAE

dolalrs04.13.09.jpgAccording to new laws drawn up by the United Arab Emirates head of state, reporters who criticize President Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed al-Nahayan will face “hefty fines” of up to $1.4 million.

Not surprisingly, the country’s media and social leaders are criticizing the bill.

“The draft law in its current form is obscure and violates many freedoms, gains and basic rights, and hinders free media and newspaper work in the country,” a letter from over 100 of the country’s leaders reads.

The Human Rights Watch and the Committee to Protect Journalists are also against the passage of the law.