TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘David Fincher’

Former EW Staffer Makes Waves with Cover, New Third Act

EWCoverAffleckThe latest EW cover, with its provocative Ben Affleck-Rosamund Pike morgue pose, has been making major media waves all week ahead of the issue’s arrival on newsstands today. There has also been, intriguingly, a second point of advance outside media focus.

Former EW staffer Gillian Flynn, who wrote the source novel and screenplay adaptation, completely chucked out the book’s third act for the 20th Century Fox fall 2014 release. EW sister publication Time has the details:

Flynn hinted in an interview that the change is drastic. “Ben was so shocked by it,” Flynn told EW. “He would say, ‘This is a whole new third act! She literally threw that third act out and started from scratch.’”

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Magazine Writing

Magazine WritingStarting September 4, learn how to get your work in top publications! You'll learn how to create captivating stories editors will want and readers will love, understand which magazines are right for your stories, craft compelling pitch letters, and more! You'll leave this class with two polished articles and corresponding pitch letters. Register now! 

Awards Pundits Cast Their Votes for Most Egregious Golden Globe Snub

There was no HFPA silver lining this morning for Robert De Niro. Deadline Hollywood awards expert Pete Hammond thinks he knows why:

The omission of Silver Linings Playbook’s Robert De Niro [from Best Supporting Actor] was among the most surprising snubs to me but clearly those two Django co-stars DiCaprio and Waltz rode in and stole his thunder (he also was too busy working to do the all-important – in terms of nominations – HFPA press conference).

Over at TheWrap, Steve Pond leads off his analysis with a look at how the lack of a Beasts of the Southern Wild Best Drama nod underscores the starry-eyed HFPA ballot view:

How else to explain the way the Globes voters ignored Beasts but nominated Nicole Kidman for the laughably trashy The Paperboy? And not only did they go for Kidman in that potboiler, but they gave her a second nomination for her performance in the TV movie Hemingway & Gellhorn.

Read more

David Fincher Has Scott Rudin’s Embargo Back

Miami Herald film critic Rene Rodriguez was able to track down The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo director David Fincher, to get the filmmaker’s opinion about all this New Yorker-David Denby brouhaha business.

In case you hadn’t yet heard, Denby has been chastised by the film’s producer, Scott Rudin, and many media colleagues for breaking the December 13 Sony embargo on published reviews of the Fincher flick. On the very same Miami newspaper website, in fact, LA Times media critic Patrick Goldstein wonders whether the whole concept of a film review embargo is even still valid.

FishbowlLA applauds Fincher for: a) Putting this matter in the proper perspective (“tempest in a teapot…”); and, b) Saying something that we’ve always firmly believed would be far preferable for just about all concerned:

“Look, if it were up to me, I wouldn’t show movies to anybody before they were released. I wouldn’t give clips to talk shows. I would do one trailer and three television spots and let the chips fall where they may. That’s how far in the other direction I am. If I had my way, the New York Film Critics Circle would not have seen this movie [November 28] and then we would not be in this situation. I would be opening this movie on Wednesday Dec. 21 and I would have three screenings on Tuesday Dec. 20 and that would be it.

Read more

The National Society of Film Critics Tabs Social Network Best Picture

The Road to the Oscars went through Manhattan over the weekend. New York-based National Society of Film Critics chose The Social Network, the movie that chronicles the genesis of Facebook, as best picture.  

The assembled 61 critics from across the country met at Sardi’s Restaurant for their 45th annual meeting.

The group “liked” The Social Network enough to give best actor honors to Jesse Eisenberg (above). He played the emotionless Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. The motion picture was also handed directing (David Fincher) and screenplay (Aaron Sorkin) accolades.

Italian actress Giovanna Mezzogiorno won as best actress for her role as Mussolini’s secret lover in the little known (at least in the U.S.) Vincere.

Named as supporting actor, Geoffrey Rush was honored for his turn as a speech therapist in The King’s Speech, while Olivia Williams was victorious as supporting actress for The Ghost Writer.  

True Grit was named best cinematography.

The Social Media View from Down Under

West coast freelancer Gerard Wright, via a Saturday, December 18th piece in the Sydney Morning Herald, tees off Time Magazine‘s selection of Mark Zuckerberg as Person the Year to relay some critical job seeking advice to all twentysomething non-billionaires. This holiday season and beyond, DON’T drink and status update.

Howard Rheingold, who teaches a social media class at Stanford University, has begun to notice [a resistance to sharing private life moments on social media] among his former students, now in their 20s, passed over for post-graduate positions or jobs. The reason for those failures? “Their drunken Facebook pictures,” he said in a radio interview.

Read more

The Social Network Wins Big at The National Board of Review Awards

The Social Network is cleaning up in the early awards season. The film just won Best Film, Best Director for David Fincher, Best Screenplay for Aaron Sorkin and Best Actor for Jesse Eisenberg at The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures.

That said, despite sweeping most of the major categories, indieWIRE‘s Anne Thompson cautions against reading too much into the results as a predictor of Oscar gold.

The NBR is not always a forecaster of things to come, but rather a bellwether of where the momentum is at this moment in time. It also tends to be a bit New York-centric, and always does well by Sony Pictures Classics, which is releasing Mike Leigh’s Another Year and foreign winner Of Gods and Men.

Thompson has the rest of the winners at indieWire.

Pitt Takes On Homer — And We Don’t Mean Simpson

Brad Pitt, taking on a definitively intellectual slant, will dance around a starring role in a film version of Homer‘s epic poem “The Odyssey” with “Mad Max” director George Miller attached to direct, Variety sayspitt.jpg.

Pitt, under his banner Plan B Prods., will produce for Warner Bros.

No stranger to the Greeks, Pitt played Achilles in the Wolfgang Petersen-directed “Troy,” a global blockbuster that David Benioff adapted from “The Iliad.”

Both Homer poems dealt with the Trojan War. “The Odyssey” focused on the exploits of Odysseus, who hatched the idea to build the Trojan Horse. “The Odyssey” deals with his long journey home after he declines to become a god.

Pitt will next be seen in the David Fincher-directed “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” and the Terrence Malick-directed “Tree of Life.” He just began shooting the Quentin Tarantino-directed “Inglourious Basterds.”

Miller remains attached to direct “Justice League” at Warner Bros.