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Posts Tagged ‘Dow Jones’

Dow Jones Makes Several Leadership Changes, Names Almar Latour Exec Editor

Dow Jones has made three changes to its editorial leadership. According to a memo from Gerard Baker, editor-in-chief of Dow Jones and managing editor of The Wall Street JournalAlmar Latour has been promoted to executive editor, and Rebecca Blumenstein and Matt Murray have been promoted to deputy editors-in-chief.

Per the memo, Blumenstein will be overseeing news content and Murray will be overseeing output. In his new role, Latour will “assume responsibility for our editorial strategy around the world,” explained Baker.

Baker also writes that a new Page One editor for the Journal will be named in the next few days.

All appointments take effect January 1, 2013. Baker’s full note can be seen below.

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SmartMoney Folds Print Magazine, 25 Staffers Laid Off

After 20 years, it’s the end of the line for SmartMoney as a print publication. The Dow Jones and Co. personal finance magazine will now focus its energy on being a stand-alone website within the MarketWatch family.

Reports say the 25 print staffers, including editor-in-chief Jonathan Dahl, will not transition to the online version. The employees would have to reapply for open positions at smartmoney.com. Nine digital positions are expected to be created at the site within Dow Jones.

Dahl told wwd.com yesterday, “I don’t think people were surprised. It’s been a tough market for a while. But it’s always a shock.”

Even though Dow Jones kept SmartMoney afloat with a hefty investment in the past two years, the closing was not a surprise to insiders. WWD reports that there was a drop off of advertisers since the financial crash, and an early proponent supporter, Dow Jones president Todd Larsen, stepped down earlier this week.

SmartMoney ’s September issue, its last, hits newsstands August 14.

 

Dow Jones CEO Les Hinton is Resigning

The havoc around the News Corp. hacking scandal is really picking up steam, as Les Hinton just announced that he’s stepping down as CEO of Dow Jones. All Things D has the memo from Rupert Murdoch and Hinton’s resignation letter. Here’s a segment from Murdoch’s note:

News Corporation is not Rupert Murdoch. It is the collective creativity and effort of many thousands of people around the world, and few individuals have given more to this Company than Les Hinton.

And a section from Hinton’s resignation letter:

That I was ignorant of what apparently happened is irrelevant and in the circumstances I feel it is proper for me to resign from News Corp, and apologize to those hurt by the actions of the News of the World.

Two things: 1) There’s something eerie about that line from Murdoch about News Corp. not being just him and 2) This is not going away. Not for a long, long time.

Reuters Names Paul Ingrassia Deputy Editor-in-Chief

Thomson Reuters just announced that they’ve hired Paul Ingrassia, a former Dow Jones executive, as its new Deputy Editor-in-Chief. Joining Ingrassia is The Daily’s Managing Editor, Jim Gaines, who will leave the digital newspaper to become an Ethics Editor at Reuters.

The big time moves are part of Reuters revamping its news operations. The company is hoping to make better use of its vast resources and restructure so that its reporting is more efficient.

Reuters Editor-in-Chief Stephen Adler explained in a company press release, “We must be second to none in speed, accuracy, relevance, and fairness, but also – and crucially – in enterprise, insight, analysis and originality.”

Dow Jones Seeks Super Collaborative Global News Integration Editor

If you live by the phrase “there’s no ‘I’ in ‘team,’” then we have just the job for you. Dow Jones Newswires is on the hunt for a global news integration editor to act as the division’s rep on the New York News Hub, which is a group of editors from various Dow Jones publications who ensure all news groups collaborate on news coverage.

You’ll be working with editors at the Wall Street Journal, MarketWatch and more to ensure timely coverage of breaking news; quality of coverage and the seamless collaboration between news teams. Detail-oriented team players are most wanted.

The ideal candidate is an editor with a nose for news, and a working knowledge of Dow Jones Newswires’ structure and journalists. You should be passionate about generating top-notch coverage around the clock (hey, that’s the life of a news editor) and enthusiastic about working with others. Interested? Apply here.

Pre-Murdoch Wall Street Journal Managing Editor Walked With $6.4 million

PH2008070702834.jpgDon’t cry too hard for Marcus Brauchli, the former Wall Street Journal editor who resigned from the paper four months after Rupert Murdoch acquired it from the Bancroft family.

Now executive editor at The Washington Post, it’s always been a closely-guarded secret how much Brauchli got to walk away from his position, but the new book on the Murdoch/Bancroft saga by Sarah Ellison has finally revealed the number to be $6.4 million.

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Pay Walls: What Others Can Learn From WSJ

journal logo 3.pngAs Rupert Murdoch prepares to bring pay walls to all his News Corp. brands, he’ll likely be looking to his own Wall Street Journal for guidance. Other pubs will probably be looking at the Journal, too. So we went to the source. We asked Dow Jones‘ public relations manager Emily Edmonds what makes the Journal‘s pay model so successful?

“We’ve always found that if we focus on giving our users unique value they will want to pay for it,” Edmonds said, repeating the phrase we’ve heard often in regards to paid content: “unique value.”

“The Journal has always provided its users with high quality content that can’t be found anywhere else,” she continued. “Often it is actionable regarding our users’ business and their life.”

So, the key to getting readers to pay is to offer something unique that they need to read. Got it.

And how does WSJ decide what goes behind the pay wall? Explains Edmonds, “The Journal‘s editors place core financial and business news behind the pay wall and keep general news and lifestyle content, plus videos and real time commentary, accessible to all.”

We were also curious about the recently launched Wall Street Journal Professional Edition, which offers subscribers customized content from the Journal, Dow Jones newswires and the Dow Jones-owned news database Factiva — for up to $49 a month. Does WSJ have any similar pay models in the works?

“We are always thinking about premium products and looking for ways to expand the brand,” Edmonds said cryptically. That seems like publicist-speak for “we’re not telling.” Guess we’ll just have to wait and see.

Previously: WSJ Tries New Pay Model Targets To Professionals

Report: Thomson Reuters To Cut 240 From Legal Division

westlaw.jpgOne day after former BusinessWeek editor Stephen Adler was named editorial director of Thomson Reuters‘ Professional division, Dow Jones reports that the media company will lay off 240 employees from one of that division’s sub-sectors.

According to Dow Jones, the cuts will come from Thomson Reuters’ legal division, which includes the Westlaw database and other information and services for legal professionals. The division employs 13,000 people, meaning layoffs of this size will decrease the staff by less than two percent.

Update: A Thomson Reuters spokesman has confirmed to FishbowlNY that the company’s legal division today told 240 people “across a number of its North American businesses and locations that their positions have been eliminated.” Those let go were “primarily in software and content operations.” Severance packages and “outplacement support” is being offered to all those affected, the rep added.

Thomson Reuters To Cut 240 Positions In Legal Business –Dow Jones Newswires

Previously: Former BusinessWeek Editor Adler Finds A New Home At Reuters

Everyone Still Wary Of Murdoch’s Bing Deal

bing222.jpgThe big news right before Thanksgiving turned us all into sleepy zombies was Rupert Murdoch‘s plans to take all his News Corp. and Dow Jones business off of Google’s search engines, which were stealing all his lucky charms content.

Murdoch was so angry about the inability to make money off of Google’s Web traffic in fact, that he was hitting them where it hurts: by moving over to their competitor Microsoft’s new search engine, Bing. Would any other big papers follow suit? Michael Liedtke from The Associated Press (one of the other media companies flirting with the idea of moving to Bing) says it’s unlikely: Google still provides 21 percent of traffic to news sites, with Bing providing only 2 percent.

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Dow Jones Taps McKinsey & Co.

journal logo 2.pngAfter Condé Nast hired consultants McKinsey & Co. to help “realign” the magazine publisher’s business, four magazine ended up shuttered and hundreds lost their jobs.

But Dow Jones, the Rupert Murdoch-owned Wall Street Journal publisher that last week revealed that it had also enlisted McKinsey’s help, insists that this move will help grow the business, not shrink it.

“It is wrong to say we’re engaging consultants to cut costs,” Journal spokesman Howard Hoffman told Forbes. “Our emphasis is on building and growing our products.”

To be fair, the Journal has recently launched new products like its new paid online product aimed at professionals, although cuts have been made — like the closure of the Boston bureau — despite the paper’s recent claim to the title of number one newspaper in circulation. But even the highest circ paper can be run more efficiently and, like with Condé, we’ll be keeping our ear to the ground for big developments coming out of Dow Jones in the next few months. We hope those developments won’t include more layoffs.

McKinsey Comes To The House Of MurdochForbes

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