FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Elisabeth Biondi’

New Yorker Photo Editor: ‘It’s About More Than the Picture That Gets Published’

Seattle native Whitney C. Johnson is back in her hometown to give a lecture at the Seattle Art Museum.

WhitneyCJohnsonTalk

Ahead of the museum talk, she spoke via telephone with The Stranger visual arts writer Jen Graves about her seven years on the job as one of The New Yorker‘s team of photo editors. At one point during the informative Q&A, Johnson – now the director of photography – outlined her admirable big-picture M.O.:

“I try to assign photographers assignments that can contribute to a person’s body of work. Thomas Struth had a show in New York recently, and one of the images he shot on assignment for us. Moises Saman was recently showing me the book dummy for his work from the Middle East over the last five years or so, and I’d say about 20 percent of the pictures he’s shot on assignment for us.”

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Middle Grade Novel Writing

Middle Grade Novel WritingStarting January 15, work with a literary agent to write your middle-grade novel! In this course, you'll learn how to develop strong characters, write compelling dialogue, master the art of revision, and market your work to publishing houses and agents. Register now!

Elisabeth Biondi Leaves The New Yorker

Elisabeth Biondi is leaving The New Yorker after 15 years, per a blog post on the magazine’s site. She has been its Visual Editor since 1996.

Do yourself a favor and check out the New Yorker post about Biondi leaving. It features a slideshow of pictures hand-picked by photographers from their favorite shoots with Biondi. The photographers also provide some commentary. It’s touching and the pictures, as you can see, are fantastic.

Also, here’s an interview with Biondi reflecting on her career. Through the piece we found this bit of trivia: The first picture in The New Yorker was in 1992. It was a photo of Malcolm X, by Richard Avedon.