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Posts Tagged ‘Fareed Zakaria’

Michael Hastings Gets Some Posthumous Love from Fox News Journo

TheLastMagazineCoverFrom the latest wave of reviews for Michael Hastings‘ posthumous novel The Last Magazine, out today, one jumps out. A rave in the Washington Post by Fox News chief D.C. correspondent James Rosen:

The [titular] magazine, you’ll not be surprised to learn, is a mid-Manhattan snake pit of literary ambition and fame-lust, where the international editor, an Indian intellectual-cum-socialite, vies with the managing editor, a bow-tied Southern historian, for the throne of editor-in-chief. The publisher has played up the parlor-game angle, and yes, some fun is to be had identifying Media Luminaries skewered here via roman à clef (Fareed Zakaria, Nick Denton, Lally Weymouth, et al.)…

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Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for the Week

Here’s a look at what FishbowlNY stories made the most buzz this week.

  1. Z100 Names New Co-Host (left) for Elvis Duran‘s Morning Show, August 10
  2. Fareed Zakaria Definitely Plagiarized The New Yorker, August 10
  3. New York Times Public Editor Says Lolo Jones Piece Was Too Harsh, August 9
  4. Clear Channel to Purchase WOR Radio, August 13
  5. Helen Gurley Brown, Iconic Editor, Dead at 90, August 13
  6. Kelly Ripa Gets $20 Million A Year to Act an Idiot, August 9

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Time Magazine ‘Satisfied’ That Fareed Zakaria Plagiarizing Was ‘Isolated Incident’

Fareed Zakaria is staying out of trouble with on Time magazine. Zakaria received ridicule for plagiarizing a New Yorker article in his latest Time column.

But a Time spokesperson says in a statement that the Zakaria matter is over.

“We have completed a thorough review of each of Fareed Zakaria’s columns for Time, and we are entirely satisfied that the language in question in his recent column was an unintentional error and an isolated incident for which he has apologized. We look forward to having Fareed’s thoughtful and important voice back in the magazine with his next column in the issue that comes out on September 7.”

Zakaria also hosts a weekly show on CNN.

Photo: CNN.com

Fareed Zakaria Might Have Definitely Plagiarized The New Yorker [Update]

Fareed Zakaria is in trouble for an article on gun control he penned for Time. Well, maybe we should say “he penned/ripped from a New Yorker article in April.” Newsbusters reports that Zakaria’s essay, “The Case for Gun Control,” lifts whole sections from an article in the New Yorker by Jill Lepore.

Have a look for yourself.

Zakaria’s piece:

Adam Winkler, a professor of constitutional law at UCLA, documents the actual history in Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America. Guns were regulated in the U.S. from the earliest years of the Republic. Laws that banned the carrying of concealed weapons were passed in Kentucky and Louisiana in 1813. Other states soon followed: Indiana in 1820, Tennessee and Virginia in 1838, Alabama in 1839 and Ohio in 1859. Similar laws were passed in Texas, Florida and Oklahoma. As the governor of Texas (Texas!) explained in 1893, the “mission of the concealed deadly weapon is murder. To check it is the duty of every self-respecting, law-abiding man.

Compare that with this section from Lepore’s article:

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Bill Maher, VICE Partner for HBO News Magazine

It makes perfect sense for HBO to expand the Bill Maher current events coverage playing field, and today, the network has indicated it will be doing so in a most intriguing manner.

Real Time host Maher will executive produce a weekly news magazine hosted by VICE founder Shane Smith. Smith will also be one of the other executive producers along with VICE chief creative officer Eddy Moretti. CNN’s Fareed Zakaria meanwhile will be on board as show consultant.

From today’s announcement:

VICE has emerged as a premier new media brand through a savvy combination of irreverence, smarts and fearlessness,” said Michael Lombardo, president HBO programming. “We are excited to offer a forum for their groundbreaking style of news coverage and look forward to a show that’s like nothing else on TV.”

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Time Publishing Special Issue on Osama Bin Laden

Time is publishing a special issue dedicated to Osama Bin Laden’s death on Thursday, marking the first time the magazine has ever released three issues in one week. Time released a special Royal Wedding issue today, and its regular issue goes on sale Friday.

As you can see, Bin Laden got the iconic “x” treatment from Time. It’s only the fourth time the cover has been used. Other “x” worthy people: Adolf Hilter (May 7, 1945), Saddam Hussein (April 21, 2003), and Abu Musab al-Zarqawi (June 19, 2006). That’s quite a list.

The Bin Laden issue will be the regular price of $4.99, and feature pieces from Joe Klein, Fareed Zakaria, and David von Drehle.

Starry-Eyed: A Look At Life.com’s Best Photos Of 2010

To celebrate the end of 2010, Life.com asked various celebrities and media personalities — including Andy Richter, Harry Benson, Khaled Hosseini, Alan Cumming,  Salman Rushdie, Brian Williams, Sarah Silverman, Jimmy Wales, Arianna Huffington, Terry McDonell and Fareed Zakaria — to choose their personal favorite images from among Life‘s 2010 Pictures of the Year. Life.com has the final list of photos, including each person’s explanation for why, exactly, each specific image resonated for him or her.

Pictured here is author Salman Rushdie’s choice, “Heavenly Bodies,” a striking image of the Carina Nebula region taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. Rushdie explains why he selected this particular image: “The universe creates beauty on the most gigantic of scales, humbling us by reminding us of our smallness, and simultaneously lifting our hearts by showing us so much glory.”

TimeFrames Reviews The Past Decade In Print, Online And On Your Television

As we reach November’s end, it’s time for one of my favorite annual customs: Looking back. Few do this better than Time magazine, and, this time, the magazine is not only reviewing the past year, but major news events of the decade now coming to an end.

Time‘s single-topic retrospective, titled TimeFrames, went live online this morning and will be available on newsstands this Friday. The magazine has also joined with CNN to produce a primetime show, “TimeFrames: A John King Special.” The special, which features interviews with managing editor Richard Stengel, Time executive editor Nancy Gibbs, Joe Klein, Fareed Zakaria and other Time editors and writers, will air tomorrow, Thanksgiving Day, at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. ET and throughout this holiday weekend.

In addition, the magazine has worked on an ad campaign focused on Time magazine’s iconic red border.

Further information can be found online at www.time.com/timeframesissue, including a video on Time‘s reporting of the major events of the past ten years, featuring Gibbs.

In his letter to readers, Stengel touches upon a particular duality when taking a look at our rapidly changign world:

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The Search For Newsweek‘s EIC Continues, Talks With Diller Back On

Newsweek has yet to name its new editor in chief, although it hasn’t been for lack of trying. Talks are back on between the news weekly’s new owner, Sidney Harman and IAC’s Barry Diller, who owns the Daily Beast. Speculation continues regarding a future merger between the two would place Daily Beast founder Tina Brown at Newsweek‘s helm.

Other names that have been tossed into the ring have included former Newsweek International editor Fareed Zakaria, who declined the position, and, as The New York Observer reports, Daily Beast executive editor Edward Felsenthal. And then there’s this interesting anecdote:

Former Observer editor Peter Kaplan was also in the mix — until he and Dr. Harman crossed signals about a dinner meeting, leaving the impression that Dr. Harman had stood Mr. Kaplan up.

And thus the wait, and the rumors, continue.

Outgoing Editor Jim Hoge And Foreign Affairs Look Forward With The Magazine’s November/December Issue

For its November / December issue, out on newsstands now (and online), Foreign Affairs magazine elected to look towards the future through essays and book recommendations by some of today’s best thinkers. The issue will feature a special cover as well as a two-column makeup to make it easy for readers to take in all the information and recommendations within.

According to David Kellogg, the magazine’s publisher:

“This special issue of Foreign Affairs has already raised the bar for the magazine — it is the first single-themed and largest issue ever produced.  The cover has added a gatefold and dramatic cover graphics. Readership (made up of 20 percent newsstand and 80 percent subscriber based) continues to grow.  In addition, ad revenue for the Nov/Dec issue grew 65 percent year over year, quite an enviable position in the publishing business today.”

The issue will provide an in-depth exploration of far-reaching issues impacting both the U.S. and the world at large, organized by category: Planetary issues (such as security, prosperity, education, water, population declines, climate control, etc.), international issues (for example, a look at how powers are allocated in the United States and Europe versus Asian nations, as well as how international organizations are changing as power shifts across the globe), and the role the U.S. plays on a global scale (its consensus with other world powers, its multilateral approach to security, use of military, etc.).

In addition, the print issue will feature a special book section (although regular Foreign Affairs readers need not worry — the regular book section is available online), with 17 contributors — including Madeleine Albright, Aayan Hirsi Ali, Niall Ferguson and Fareed Zakaria — each suggesting one or two books which deal with “the world ahead.”

The theme of looking to the future is particularly appropriate given this issue marks the last to be edited by James Hoge, who is stepping down as the magazine’s editor at the end of this year, when Gideon Rose will then become the magazine’s sixth editor in its 90-year history. Among the new projects he will pursue ARE chairing Human Rights Watch (which he begun doing earlier with month), working with an international consulting firm, and teaching at New York University’s Center for Global Affairs.

Hoge took the time to speak to us about Foreign Affairs, as well as his future, and told us that, when first approaching this particular issue of the magazine, there was the initial temptation of using it as a platform to recap his 18 years at its helm. He decided against this, however, thinking it best to keep the focus on what lies ahead. After all, he said, “history always surprises you,” especially as its being made.

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