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Posts Tagged ‘Fareed Zakaria’

Starry-Eyed: A Look At Life.com’s Best Photos Of 2010

To celebrate the end of 2010, Life.com asked various celebrities and media personalities — including Andy Richter, Harry Benson, Khaled Hosseini, Alan Cumming,  Salman Rushdie, Brian Williams, Sarah Silverman, Jimmy Wales, Arianna Huffington, Terry McDonell and Fareed Zakaria — to choose their personal favorite images from among Life‘s 2010 Pictures of the Year. Life.com has the final list of photos, including each person’s explanation for why, exactly, each specific image resonated for him or her.

Pictured here is author Salman Rushdie’s choice, “Heavenly Bodies,” a striking image of the Carina Nebula region taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. Rushdie explains why he selected this particular image: “The universe creates beauty on the most gigantic of scales, humbling us by reminding us of our smallness, and simultaneously lifting our hearts by showing us so much glory.”

TimeFrames Reviews The Past Decade In Print, Online And On Your Television

As we reach November’s end, it’s time for one of my favorite annual customs: Looking back. Few do this better than Time magazine, and, this time, the magazine is not only reviewing the past year, but major news events of the decade now coming to an end.

Time‘s single-topic retrospective, titled TimeFrames, went live online this morning and will be available on newsstands this Friday. The magazine has also joined with CNN to produce a primetime show, “TimeFrames: A John King Special.” The special, which features interviews with managing editor Richard Stengel, Time executive editor Nancy Gibbs, Joe Klein, Fareed Zakaria and other Time editors and writers, will air tomorrow, Thanksgiving Day, at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. ET and throughout this holiday weekend.

In addition, the magazine has worked on an ad campaign focused on Time magazine’s iconic red border.

Further information can be found online at www.time.com/timeframesissue, including a video on Time‘s reporting of the major events of the past ten years, featuring Gibbs.

In his letter to readers, Stengel touches upon a particular duality when taking a look at our rapidly changign world:

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The Search For Newsweek‘s EIC Continues, Talks With Diller Back On

Newsweek has yet to name its new editor in chief, although it hasn’t been for lack of trying. Talks are back on between the news weekly’s new owner, Sidney Harman and IAC’s Barry Diller, who owns the Daily Beast. Speculation continues regarding a future merger between the two would place Daily Beast founder Tina Brown at Newsweek‘s helm.

Other names that have been tossed into the ring have included former Newsweek International editor Fareed Zakaria, who declined the position, and, as The New York Observer reports, Daily Beast executive editor Edward Felsenthal. And then there’s this interesting anecdote:

Former Observer editor Peter Kaplan was also in the mix — until he and Dr. Harman crossed signals about a dinner meeting, leaving the impression that Dr. Harman had stood Mr. Kaplan up.

And thus the wait, and the rumors, continue.

Outgoing Editor Jim Hoge And Foreign Affairs Look Forward With The Magazine’s November/December Issue

For its November / December issue, out on newsstands now (and online), Foreign Affairs magazine elected to look towards the future through essays and book recommendations by some of today’s best thinkers. The issue will feature a special cover as well as a two-column makeup to make it easy for readers to take in all the information and recommendations within.

According to David Kellogg, the magazine’s publisher:

“This special issue of Foreign Affairs has already raised the bar for the magazine — it is the first single-themed and largest issue ever produced.  The cover has added a gatefold and dramatic cover graphics. Readership (made up of 20 percent newsstand and 80 percent subscriber based) continues to grow.  In addition, ad revenue for the Nov/Dec issue grew 65 percent year over year, quite an enviable position in the publishing business today.”

The issue will provide an in-depth exploration of far-reaching issues impacting both the U.S. and the world at large, organized by category: Planetary issues (such as security, prosperity, education, water, population declines, climate control, etc.), international issues (for example, a look at how powers are allocated in the United States and Europe versus Asian nations, as well as how international organizations are changing as power shifts across the globe), and the role the U.S. plays on a global scale (its consensus with other world powers, its multilateral approach to security, use of military, etc.).

In addition, the print issue will feature a special book section (although regular Foreign Affairs readers need not worry — the regular book section is available online), with 17 contributors — including Madeleine Albright, Aayan Hirsi Ali, Niall Ferguson and Fareed Zakaria — each suggesting one or two books which deal with “the world ahead.”

The theme of looking to the future is particularly appropriate given this issue marks the last to be edited by James Hoge, who is stepping down as the magazine’s editor at the end of this year, when Gideon Rose will then become the magazine’s sixth editor in its 90-year history. Among the new projects he will pursue ARE chairing Human Rights Watch (which he begun doing earlier with month), working with an international consulting firm, and teaching at New York University’s Center for Global Affairs.

Hoge took the time to speak to us about Foreign Affairs, as well as his future, and told us that, when first approaching this particular issue of the magazine, there was the initial temptation of using it as a platform to recap his 18 years at its helm. He decided against this, however, thinking it best to keep the focus on what lies ahead. After all, he said, “history always surprises you,” especially as its being made.

Fareed Zakaria’s Time Column Debuts

Fareed Zakaria has debuted the first entry for his new Time column. The magazine’s managing editor Richard Stengel introduces the column in his Letter to Readers:

Fareed is quite simply one of the foremost public intellectuals of our time. He does something that is rare: he connects the dots on foreign policy, politics, the economy and the larger culture to make sense of the world’s most important ideas and trends. And he does it with a subtlety that is nevertheless clear and accessible. For him, politics and international affairs are complex and gray, not black and white.

In his inaugural post, “The Real Challenge from China: Its People, Not Its Currency,” Zakaria takes a look on how China is investing in its people as the country “moves up the value chain.” This is the first column Zakaria has written for Time since leaving his post as editor of Newsweek International.

Also in this week’s issue, Joe Klein‘s cover story offers a look at what happens when a New York-based journalist criss-crosses the country to meet with “real” Americans in order to get a sense of what, exactly, is on people’s minds as we approach midterm elections. Klein’s 6,782-mile trek is also chronicled in daily entries on Time.com’s  Swampland blog.

Redesigned Newsweek Set to Launch in May

newsweek-goldcup.JPGMore details are emerging on the Newsweek redesign (the mag just celebrated its 75th anniversary) set to launch in early May. Per an article in today’s FT:

For more than a year, Thomas Ascheim, the former Nickelodeon cable executive who is Newsweek’s chief executive; Jon Meacham, editor; and Fareed Zakaria, international editor, have plotted the radical remaking of a product that had lost its relevance as a news source years ago as readers turned to the internet and cable news…A prototype of the redesign…is a cleaner take on the old, with more white space and bolder photographs. The launch will coincide with a relaunch of Newsweek.com that will replace wire copy with links to the best sources of online news, even if published by rivals.

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Journalists Say Internet Hurts

NSONYHC6_LARGE.JPGIt’s hard to read a survey like this and not conclude it’s a bit like carriage drivers saying cars are hurting the horse and buggy industry, nevertheless here it is. The Atlantic has polled 43 media insiders (Peter Beinart, Gloria Borger, Juan Williams, Fareed Zakaria, to name a few) and the majority of them (65%) feel the Internet has hurt journalism. Says one participant:

News consumption depends on news production, and I don’t see anything on the Internet that produces news — that is, detailed responsible empirical journalism — the way newspapers do (or did). It is typical of Americans to get more excited about consumption than about production.

It’s not all doom and gloom though, someone else said (and we’ll leave it to you to match responses to faces):”You abandon the conceit that ‘newspapers’ equals ‘news,’ you realize that people have far more information available to them about current events than ever before, and that’s a great thing for both journalism (the gathering of news) and the public.” Also? The Internet is here to stay. Full results can be found here.

Fareed Zakaria on The Daily Show: The Raisin vs. Virgin Debate Rages On

Newsweek contributor and CNN host Fareed Zakaria made a relatively serious appearance on Jon Stewart last night to discuss, among other things, the resilience of Mumbai after the recent terrorist attacks and how the Indian press, in comparison the American press during 9/11, handled the day after. Zakaria also points out that there is some debate as to whether a mis-translation has led terrorists to believe there will be virgins awaiting them instead of, you know, raisins.

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