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Posts Tagged ‘Joel Meares’

Jeffrey Wells Gets a Favorable Columbia Journalism Review

By his own admission, Jeffrey Wells‘ goal since 2004 at Hollywood-Elsewhere.com has been to provide film industry coverage that is unfair and unbalanced. If his stats are correct, it seems to be paying huge dividends.

According to traffic figures provided by the journalist for a Columbia Journalism review by Joel Meares of his one-man West Hollywood operation, Wells says his site is read by “30,000 odd people a day.” That is quite honestly way more than what FishbowlLA thought he was getting, with ostensibly the accent on “odd:”

“The idea is to deliver reporting, but I’ve mainly got to deliver the brand of writing of Hollywood Elsewhere, which is knowledgeable, been around for a long time, mouthy, smart-ass, opinionated,” Wells said. “Fair and modest and very careful and cautious reporting is not what I’m doing here. I’m doing incautious reporting.”

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2011 Mirror Awards Winners

Today the Newhouse School of Public Communications held its annual Mirror Awards, which celebrates the best in media industry journalism. If it sounds a little absurd, well, it is. But as we know, every award is a little odd, so on with the winners!

Best Single Article, Traditional Media: Gabriel Sherman, “Chasing Fox”  (New York)
Best Single Article, Digital Media: Jim Hopkins, “All Shook Up” (Gannett Blog)
• Best Profile, Traditional Media: Ken Auletta, “The Networker” (The New Yorker)
• Best Profile, Digital Media: Joel Meares, “The Biggest Fish in Albany?” (Columbia Journalism Review)
• Best Commentary, Traditional MediaJames Wolcott (Vanity Fair)
Best Commentary, Digital MediaEric Alterman (Center for American Progress)
• Best In-depth Piece, Traditional Media: Mary Van de Kamp Nohl, “Paper Money” (Milwaukee Magazine)

Royals Ban Satirical Coverage of William and Kate’s Wedding

Columbia Journalism Review, “relieved” to find a Royal Wedding angle for today (as are we!) is reporting that Australian Broadcasting Network (ABC) has been forced to cancel a planned satirical special covering Friday’s hallowed wedding.

The special involved an Australian comedy troupe known as the Chaser boys who would satirically comment on the wedding live on ABC2, while more slavish coverage would be be broadcast on ABC1.

But there’s nothing funny about the Royal Wedding. It is the greatest and most serious thing that’s happened to us since Brad and Angelina had a child together.  So the Chaser boys’ plan was squashed when ABC was informed by the Associated Press Television Network (APTN) that “new conditions of use issued by APTN over the Easter break state footage cannot be used ‘in any drama, comedy, satirical or similar entertainment program or content’.”

As Joel Meares writes at CJR:

Finally, isn’t it odd that the royals can still dictate to the media the conditions under which they can be covered? And equally astonishing that the media would agree to those conditions? If the effect of their rule change is minimal, why not make the case that there is minimal need to change the rules?

We are back under the rule of the British Empire. We all knew this would happen some day.