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Posts Tagged ‘Lynsey Addario’

The Four New York Times Journalists Captured in Libya Have Been Released

Six days after being captured in Libya, the four missing New York Times journalists have been released. The journalists — Lynsey Addario, Anthony Shadid, Stephen Farrell, and Tyler Hicks — were released into the custody of Turkish diplomats Monday morning.

The first piece of good news surrounding the missing journalists came on March 17, when Saif Qaddafi told Christiane Amanpour on Nightline that the four journalists would be freed.

News of the actual release broke Monday morning over (how else?) Twitter, when Namik Tan, Turkey’s ambassador to the United States, tweeted that “the 4 @nytimes journalists are on their way to leave Libyan border and will be delivered to US officials.”

A Times spokesperson gave the following statement to Yahoo’s Cutline:

We are grateful that our journalists have been released, and we are working to reunite them with their families. We have been told they are in good health and are in the process of confirming that. We thank the Turkish, British, and U.S. governments for their assistance in the release. We also appreciate the efforts of those in the Libyan government who helped secure the release this morning.

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New York Times Journalists to be Freed

Here’s some good news about a bad situation: Last night on Nightline, Christiane Amanpour spoke with Saif Qaddafi, who stated that the four New York Times journalists who went missing Tuesday, would be freed at some point today. Qaddafi, the son of Libyan leader Moammar Qaddafi, told Amanpour:

You know, they entered country illegally and when the army, when they liberated the city of Ajdabiyah from the terrorists and they found her there and they arrest her because you know foreigners in this place. But then they were happy because they found out she is American, not European. And thanks to that she will be free tomorrow.

No word on why he singled out photographer Lynsey Addario, but according to the Times, all four journalists were able to call home late last night, and the Libyan government has assured them that they will all be released.

Four New York Times Journalists Missing in Libya

Some distressing news just broke: Four journalists from The New York Times are missing in Libya. The paper last heard from them Tuesday morning, and sources told the Times that the missing were taken by government forces near the city of Ajdabiya.

Bill Keller said nothing has been confirmed about that report:

We have talked with officials of the Libyan government in Tripoli, and they tell us they are attempting to ascertain the whereabouts of our journalists. We are grateful to the Libyan government for their assurance that if our journalists were captured they would be released promptly and unharmed.

According to the Times, the four missing journalists are Anthony Shadid, Stephen Farrell, Tyler Hicks and Lynsey Addario.

Journalists Among Those Honored By MacArthur Foundation’s “Genius Grants”

mitchell2.JPGA photojournalist and an investigative reporter are among the 24 MacArthur Fellows awarded $500,000 in “no strings attached” funding over the next five years.

Earlier today, the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced its 2009 fellows — a list that includes photographer Lynsey Addario and Jerry Mitchell, a reporter at The Clarion-Ledger in Jackson, Miss.

Addario, a photojournalist based in Istanbul, was chosen by the MacArhtur Foundation for her coverage of and focus on places in the midst of unrest, such as Afghanistan, Iraq and Darfur:

“A regular theme in Addario’s work is capturing the lives of women in male-dominated societies. Her most recent project involves photographing survivors of gender-based violence in the Congo and is part of a traveling exhibition intended to increase awareness of the ongoing human rights abuses taking place there. Addario’s dedication to demystifying foreign cultures and exposing the tragic consequences of human conflict is drawing much-needed attention to conflict zones around the world and providing a valuable historical record for future generations.”

addario.JPGYou can see more of Addario’s work here.

Mitchell was recognized by the MacArthur Foundation for his work uncovering documents and evidence about Civil Rights era murders including the 1963 assassination of NAACP leader Medger Evers and the 1963 bombing of a Birmingham, Ala. church that killed four girls. Mitchell’s work has led to new trials and convictions for previously unpunished criminals. Added the foundation:

“His investment of time and painstakingly detailed research has also produced a broad range of reports on such subjects as racial reconciliation in the South and judicial bribes and chicanery in Mississippi, as well as a series on his own family’s battle against a rare genetic ailment. In an era when long-term investigative reporting is more the exception than the rule, Mitchell’s life and work serve as an example of how a journalist willing to take risks and unsettle waters can make a difference in the pursuit of justice.”

Other winners of the prestigious “genius grant” include mixed media artist Mark Bradford; novelist Edwidge Danticat; Deborah Eisenberg, a short story writer; filmmaker James Longley; and poet Heather McHugh.

After the jump, watch a video of Mitchell talking about his work and what it means to win a MacArthur Fellowship.

(Photos courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

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