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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Hogan’

Moviefone Names New Senior Writer

Moviefone, an AOL Hufington Post Media Group site, has named Mike Ryan its new Senior Writer. Ryan has been an entertainment reporter for Vanity Fair’s site, and has contributed to New York and Wired.

At Moviefone, he’ll be responsible for reviews, features, interviews and much more. Michael Hogan, Editor-in-Chief of Moviefone, said Ryan’s style will be a welcome addition to the site.

“His original reporting, commentary and videos will complement the Moviefone’s comprehensive, real-time news and opinion, and help establish the site as a hub for all things movies – as well as a starting point for opinionated conversations about film.”

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Huffington Post Introduces ‘Blog Concierge Service’ for Celebrities

The days of blogging being a meritocracy are long over. At last Tuesday night’s “At Home With Arianna” event, an event that takes place in Arianna Huffington‘s Brentwood home, Executive Features editor Michael Hogan spoke of “new opportunities for celebrities to bring attention to their causes.” The platforms for celebrities at AOL Huffington Post include “AOL Moviefone, AOL Music, StyleList, HuffPost Green, or the soon-to-be-launched HuffPost Celebrity section.”

Huffington Post reported that at the event were celebrities and “long-time HuffPost bloggers Larry David and Rita Wilson, actor Shaun Toub, and actresses Rose McGowan and Jaime King.” Sure, we admire those celebrities for taking the time to write, because blogging can be hard work! But not anymore. At least not if you’re a celebrity. Arianna then touted the company’s “blog concierge service,” where “busy celebs can dictate a blog post to an editor over the phone for publishing on the site.”

You know who else could use a blog concierge service? Actual bloggers. Like us! All this typing is such a nuisance. Don’t rule it out, Ms. Huffington. We hear you still have money left in your budget.

Michael Hogan Leaves Vanity Fair for AOL

Michael Hogan, who has been with Vanity Fair since 1998, is leaving the magazine to become the new Editor-in-Chief of Moviefone and AOL TV. Hogan will also be the Executive Features Editor of AOL Huffington Post Media Group. Hogan was most recently Executive Digital Editor for Vanity Fair.

Hogan, who will now be a part of AOL/HuffPo’s senior editorial team, plans to reenergize the brands that he’s taking over. “I couldn’t be more excited to join Arianna Huffington and her world-class team of editors, reporters, and developers,” he said. “Over the past few years, I’ve watched in awe as they have revolutionized online journalism, and I’m confident that together we can build Moviefone and AOL TV into essential destinations for fans and insiders alike.”

AOL HuffPo Snags Vanity Fair Digital Editor Michael Hogan

Another big, presumably very expensive, hire for AOL HuffPo. The megasite has apparently lured Vanity Fair executive digital editor Michael Hogan to become their new executive features editor, as well as to take control of both Movie Phone and AOL TV. He’ll be the EIC of both ventures. He seems particularly excited about the former.

“I’m hoping that I’ll be able to persuade Russ ‘Mr. Moviefone’ Leatherman to record my outgoing voicemail message,” Hogan said in the release.

Hogan had been with Vanity Fair since 1998 and VF.com’s editor since 2008.

Vanity Fair Bolsters Digital Editorial Staff

Vanity Fair screenshotAfter more than a decade of work with the magazine, executive online editor Michael Hogan has been promoted to executive digital editor at Vanity Fair.   Hogan now will manage all digital projects including VF.com, tablet and mobile applications, and social media ventures.  In his tenure as executive online editor, Hogan spearheaded the development of a Vanity Fair tablet edition, two iPhone apps, and a 300 percent rise in traffic to VF.com.  Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter is confident Hogan will flourish at his new post.

Over the past three years, Mike has transformed VF.com into a vibrant destination—the younger, funnier sibling of the magazine that I always knew it could be.  I can think of no one better to oversee the magazine’s rapidly growing portfolio of digital initiatives.

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Remembering Dominick Dunne

ddunne.jpgIn its November issue, Vanity Fair, where Dominick Dunne contributed countless articles since the mid-1980′s, has a detailed tribute to the tireless journalist and chronicler of Hollywood life and high profile court cases, written by executive online editor Michael Hogan, who first met Dunne while working as the assistant to editor Wayne Lawson.

Wrote Hogan:

“What makes his accomplishments all the more astonishing is how low he was just three decades ago. Before he became one of the most instantly recognizable magazine writers in the world, Dominick Dunne’s only claim to fame was his epic, humiliating failure.”

The must-read article highlights Dunne’s work throughout his life, particularly his propensity to identify with the victims of horrible crimes as he covered the trials of Claus von Bulow, the Menendez brothers and O.J. Simpson — an affect arising out of his experience with the murder of his own daughter Dominique, whose killer John Sweeney was convicted of a lesser charge of manslaughter:

“Dominick’s article about John Sweeney’s case was published in the March 1984 issue of Vanity Fair under the title ‘Justice.’ Even today, you can feel the rage pulsating behind his carefully chosen words.”

Hogan also talks of Dunne’s various feuds with family and friends over the years, from his own brother John to the Kennedy family, who seemed to haunt Dunne even to the day of his death last month.

“Dominick died on August 26, but fate had prepared one last humbling joke for him. The night before, Ted Kennedy had beaten him to the punch. The man who, in Dominick’s estimation, had ‘lived recklessly, performed brilliantly in Congress, and often failed miserably in life’ was all anybody could talk about.

Even in death, Dominick was being tormented by the family he resented most. It was the kind of story that would have amused the hell out of him–if only it had happened to someone else.”

Read more: Our Man DominickVanity Fair

Earlier: Vanity Fair Columnist, Prolific Author Dominick Dies