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Posts Tagged ‘Simon Owens’

Bloggers Against Blogger Lawsuit Against HuffPo

As you’ve no doubt heard by now, a class-action lawsuit was filed yesterday by Jonathan Tasini on behalf of unpaid Huffington Post bloggers, contending Arianna and her website are guilty of “unjust enrichment and deceptive business practices.”

The blogosphere hasn’t exactly come out in support of the lawsuit. Dylan Stableford of TheWrap.com says it makes no sense. Jeff Bercovici of Forbes blog Mixed Media calls the suit “a legal long shot.” And Simon Owens of Bloggasm points out that suing HuffPo sets a dangerous legal precedent:

If these writers were to succeed in their class-action lawsuit, then it would open the doors to further lawsuits to Facebook, Twitter, Livejournal, Daily Kos, and virtually every other technology platform for which people contribute content. Should Google start handing out checks to everyone who writes on its Blogspot accounts?

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Trying To Find A Business Model That Works

IMG_1821 - Version 2.jpgLast night’s panel produced by Mediabistro.com and sponsored by Demand Studios focused on finding a business model for news on the Web but — like most panels of its kind — no real conclusions were reached.

The panel was moderated by BusinessWeek columnist Jon Fine, and featured (in photo from left to right) “rogue girl blogger” Maegan Carberry, NYU professor Jay Rosen, Mediaite.com Editor at Large Rachel Sklar and NewJerseyNewsroom.com‘s Matt Romanoski.

Moderator Fine started the panel off with some scary statics — comparing the amount of ad sales money generated by the New York Times versus the Huffington Post. The Times made over $1 billion in ad revenue last year. he said. How can an online media company compete with that?

Some suggestions were tossed around, including asking readers to pay for content. Sklar suggested that media companies should make it easy for readers to purchase access to information, replicating the “buy” button on Amazon.com or iTunes that is connected to saved credit card information. She also suggested charging for “freemium” or extra content, and said she wouldn’t mind paying a few dollars a month to use Twitter, Flickr or YouTube.

“I wouldn’t mind paying for Twitter because they I would own my Tweets if anything ever went wrong,” she said.

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Newspaper Blogs Most Popular List by Simon Owens

n48505698_6272.jpgMedia blogger, Simon Owens over at Bloggasm…how can we put this gently…has a lot of time on his hands? In a good way…he could be putting his time toward something destructive…more so than media blogging…

Anyway, he ranked the top 50 newspaper blogs:

To determine this, I combed through the hundreds of blogs at the top newspaper sites and calculated each of their Technorati rankings. A Technorati ranking is based on the number of inbound links from separate blogs in a six-month period, and is a decent indicator of a blog’s popularity. Once I determined the rankings, I ordered them from popular to least popular. Below, you will find the 50 most popular newspaper blogs.

LA Times has nine in the top 50. In the top half are Andrew Malcolm and Johanna Neuman at Top of the Ticket, group blog LA Now, Alana Semuels, Alex Pham, Chris Gaither, David Sarno, Jessica Guynn, Jim Puzzanghera, Jon Healey, Mark Milian, Michelle Maltaisare at Technology and Sal Morgan and Elizabeth Snead at Dish Rag. Now when you see these people at cocktail parties you can intro them as a ‘high ranking blogger’ and see if they won’t try and correct you. Email us if they do.

Whole list is here.