TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Tina Dupuy’

Former Fishbowler Tina Dupuy on Viewpoint Tonight!

Tina Dupuy, a FishbowlLA alumnus, syndicated columnist and The Contributor editor-in-chief, will be appearing tonight — in just a minute, really — on Current TV’s Viewpoint with Eliot Spitzer to talk politics. John Fugelsang will guest host.

This isn’t the first time Dupuy has made a television appearance, and it certainly won’t be the last, but we get excited every time. Show starts at 5 pm PT, and we’ll be tuning in.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

Tina Dupuy Now Presiding Over TheContributor.com

It all sounds very Huffington Post-ish. And when we asked former FishbowlLA co-editor Tina Dupuy via email this morning if we should start addressing her as Arianna, she replied: “I’ve been called worse.”

We’re referring to the fact that Dupuy’s site soapblox.net has rebranded itself as thecontributor.com and beta-launched just in time for the Republican National Convention. The new name is a huge improvement, surely one of the first things on Dupuy’s to-do list when she moved over to the site as editor-in-chief from similar duties with crooksandliars.com.

One major difference compared to HuffPo is that the established professional writers and citizen journalists who mirror on Dupuy’s network will get to share in their portion of TheContributor’s advertising revenues 50-50. LA Progressive and Hollywood Progressive are two local area voices already on board; Dupuy says she is looking for more LA blogs to join the party.

Read more

LA Times, KPCC Crown LA Press Club Awards

At last night’s 54th Annual SoCal Journalism Awards, the big winners were the Los Angeles Times and KPCC 89.3 FM, with eight first prizes each. The LAT was led by photographer Francine Orr, who won three awards (Photojournalist of the Year, Entertainment Photo, Photo Essay), while KPCC’s haul included a pair for Molly Peterson (News or Feature Short Form, Use of Sound). KCRW, KPCC’s main competitor in the LA public radio space, failed to win any first-place prizes.

On the Hollywood trades side, it was THR five, TheWrap two and Deadline.com one, with Variety essentially abstaining. Kim Masters won a Journalist of the Year prize as well as another for her article with Daniel Miller about high-stakes Hollywood poker. Meanwhile, for TheWrap, it was not a main reporter but rather blog network contributor Richard Stellar who claimed both nods, for Weblog, Individual (tied with Danielle Berrin, Jewish Journal) and Best Facebook Presence by an Individual.

Other leading first-place winners at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel Sunday night, each capturing six such awards, were the Los Angeles Business Journal, KCET’s SoCal Connected and LA Weekly. Although in one case with the Weekly, film critic Karina Longworth was the only journalist nominated in the Daily/Weekly Newspapers category of Entertainment Reviews/Criticism/Columns.

Read more

Tina Dupuy Named EIC of SoapBlox

Well that was fast. Only weeks after leaving LA for the fruitful media plains of New York, former Fishbowler Tina Dupuy has landed herself a new gig. She’s just been named the editor-in-chief of SoapBlox’s political blog and video network.

Move to New York, become the editor-in-chief. Is that how it works?

“They hand out EIC positions the second you cross the Hudson,” Dupuy tells us. “It’s a cultural thing.”

Dupuy was most recently the managing editor of Crooks and Liars.

Previously on FishbowlLA:
The Tina Dupuy Exit Interview

The Tina Dupuy Exit Interview

It’s a bittersweet day here at FishbowlLA. Our beloved former Fishbowler Tina Dupuy and her wonderful, cartoonishly muscled husband are leaving Los Angeles this week to move to the fairer, media-saturated pastures of New York City. We’ll miss her charm and eviscerating wit and seeing her smiling punim at otherwise horrendously dull media gatherings. But we wish her the best.

And so, without further adieu, we present to you Tina’s exit-from-Los Angeles interview.

FBLA: Why the move?

TD: I’ve been making up answers to that question mostly with gauche personal information designed to discourage any follow-ups: “My dog died.” “My best friend died.” “I’m a bad driver.”

The real answer is kind of all of the above plus I’ve been going back east a lot for work. I expect to be there late summer for both conventions and a couple of other events … so living there is more economical. Yes, I’m moving to NYC because it’s cheaper.

Read more

Livestream a Double-Edged Sword for Social Movements

FishbowlLA alum Tina Dupuy has a nice piece in CityWatch on the emerging Livestream–unedited raw video streamed live online–trend in covering grassroots political movements–especially Occupy Wall Street.

I asked [UpTake] founder and director Jason Barnett, who’s trained hundreds of “citizen journalists” (they call themselves UpTakers), if it’s unusual for protesters to morph into journalists because they downloaded a smart phone app. He explains, “It’s the natural byproduct of livestreaming. You’re forced into the role of the person handling the truth.”

There are no edits. There’s only what’s happening at that moment and maybe some commentary or explaining, says Barnett. If sunlight is a disinfectant, livestreaming is a laser.

“People are tired of being lied to by the media,” says [Occupier] Tim Pool, who adds, “Transparency is paramount.”

But here’s the rub: As Occupy tries to find itself, transparency and more specifically livestreaming has become a double-edged sword. Yes, all occupiers love when the police are being filmed. But not so much when they are caught on livestream doing illegal acts.

Read more

FOX 11 Reporter Trash Talks Occupy LA, Spreads Misinformation

Fox 11′s Gigi Graciette reported on the Occupy LA eviction yesterday by sorting through the remaining debris around City Hall, including what Graciette suggested, with zero evidence, were guerrilla chemical weapons. In her report, she said:

Do you see the LAPD wearing hazmat suits? They had heard that there were urine-filled bottles and that they may be tossed at them… I saw this last night in the dark… they’re water bottles, and they’re filled with – I don’t know if it’s ammonia, it’s a foamy white liquid. There are dozens and dozens of these. We actually saw a guy kick one towards cops last night!

She also Tweeted the following:

Former fishie Tina Dupuy took Graciette to task for her lazy reporting over at Crooks & Liars:

The white liquid is more than likely Maalox. They had it on site because it is supposed to neutralize the pain of pepper spray and tear gas.

Read more

The Atlantic All Over Occupy LA

Don’t see too many stories about LA in The Atlantic, for relatively obvious geographical reasons. But the mag has run back-to-back stories on its website about the Occupy LA movement–despite the fact similar protests are happening much closer to their home.

First, former Fishbowler Tina Dupuy took a formal tour of the LA City Hall encampment from medical marijuana advocate Cheryl Aichele–who, Dupuy informs us, is staying in a “large tent with a production company logo on it (this is how we roll in LA).”

More from Dupuy:

Sure, there are hippies dancing. And yes, there are drum circles. It’s LA, so there’s also “medicinal” marijuana wafting about. But mostly the crowd looks like LA: Half Latino, a quarter African-American and Asian and mostly middle-class. And that’s who is in the meetings, not the hippies. In the meetings, people discuss things like Glass-Steagall, plans of actions and politicians to reach out to. There’s a general sense that this is something big and they need to figure out what to do with it. All is reported at the General Assembly or GA every night at 7:30 p.m. Participants use Quaker consensus decision-making hand signals in all meetings. Participants can indicate if they agree, disagree, kind of agree or oppose vehemently — all non-verbally. So speakers get to see the reaction of the crowd in real time. It’s public polling and it’s painfully slow and tedious. Meaning: this is what democracy looks like. Everyone has a voice and not all of them are poignant. Some of them are repetitive — and there’s a hand signal for that, too.

Read more

Crooks and Liars Throwing Wall Street-Protest Pizza Party

Pizza!As thousands upon thousands of people across the country rally in the streets against Wall Street greed and government complicity in the theft, the liberal blogosphere here in LA is trying to do its part to help out the movement. Crooks and Liars has started a pizza donation fund to feed hungry protesters.

As of this morning, the site had raised $8,600 from more than 300 donors. That’s a lot of pizza.

“As long as people are out there sticking up for the 99 percent, I will be finding local pizzerias that deliver,” former Fishbowler and current C&L managing editor Tina Dupuy tells us.

Demonstrators outside LA City Hall say they’re there to stay. So if you want to help, go to Crooks and Liars’ donation page, or simply call up Rocket Pizza and tell them you want to buy a pie for some hungry protesters.

CrooksandLiars.com Racks Up Author Rick Perlstein

LA anchored political blog CrooksandLiars.com, which recently spirited away our very own Tina Dupuy as its managing editor, has added another formidable voice to the honor roll.

Author Rick Perlstein chimes in today with his second column for the site, “Reagan’s Failed Sell of Government as Too Big.” It’s all about Prop 1, a California ballot initiative supported in 1973 by the then-Governor and its link to a subsequent, modern-age false political premise:

The conservatives quite effectively claimed Proposition 13 as a nationwide mandate for radical reduction of taxation and government. They did that, of course, in 1980 too—and had lots of success passing budgets and laws that harmonized with the claim.

But here is a very crucial point about our political moment: Ronald Reagan did not get elected because he promised to dismantle big government in America.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>