TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

The Pope

“We Have A Pope!”

> FNC’s Chris Wallace in Rome: “I have shivers up my spine.” The chyron blares: “We Have A Pope!”

> On NBC, Brian Williams admitted he was “delving into the realm of speculation.” Every other anchor did the same thing…

> White smoke was seen at 11:49am, and the bells tolled at 12:04pm, according to NBC’s lower-third.

> On CBS, John Roberts anchored from a balcony overlooking St. Peter’s Square, while Bob Schieffer anchored from NY.

> ABC’s coverage, “The New Pope,” was anchored by Charlie Gibson in New York.

> “There is a new leader of the 1.1 billion member Catholic church. A new pope has been elected,” CNN’s Wolf Blitzer trumpeted.

> Gawker: “Fox News calls it black! Italian media says white! ABC says white! Someone will change their mind! ABC is now uncertain!”

Pope: “Amazing Scene” As Smoke Appears

MSNBC’s David Shuster is blogging from Rome. Here’s an excerpt from his Monday post: “The smoke started to get darker… and within minutes, the Vatican confirmed that the cardinals ended the day the way nearly everybody had expected, with a first ballot that produced no pope. For a few minutes though, it was an amazing scene as broadcasters and journalists of every stripe wondered what exactly was happening…”

Conclave: Big Anchors Stay Stateside

None of the evening news anchors are on hand for the start of the Papal conclave, the AP’s David Bauder notes. While Brian Williams is in Oklahoma City, Lester Holt is leading the coverage from Vatican City. On ABC, Charlie Gibson is staying in NYC, with Bob Woodruff reporting from Rome. Bob Schieffer is also anchoring from NY, while John Roberts leads the coverage from Rome. Chris Jansing is on site for MSNBC, and Chris Wallace is anchoring on FNC.

Pope: Cablers Premiere “Chimney Cams”

The Chimney Cam premiered on all three cable news channels earlier today, as a box in the corner of the screen offered a live shot of the Papal Chimney at the Vatican. On CNN, anchor Kyra Phillips and analyst Delia Gallagher laughed as they struggled to identify the color of the smoke. “I can see this popping up on all the late night shows,” Kyra said. “What color is the smoke?!” FNC plastered a “No Decision” graphic on the bottom of the screen. E-mailer comments:

> “When the first smoke came out, you reeeeally couldn’t tell whether it was black or white,” FNC’s Greg Palkot said.

> CNN’s banner is “New Pope: The World Waits.” “How many of the only 1/5 of the world who are Catholic are waiting and how many are going about their daily lives?,” an e-mailer asks…

> MSNBC.com is offering a free “Smoke Cam” live shot.

> “Fox News has the worst setup for the Vatican Pipe cam as they are shrinking their regular video screen,” an e-mailer critiqued. I disagree: I think the split screen looked great.

> Some of the broadcast TV types are laughing at the continuous “Chimney Watch…”

> “This is the first time in the history of Earth that the crazy conclave chimney signals can be witnessed live on the Internet,” Sploid says.

Pope: Early-Morning Conclave

FNC, CNN and MSNBC will go live to Rome at 4 a.m. as the Papal Conclave commences. On Fox, Chris Wallace will anchor live from Rome, along with correspondents Rick Leventhal, Greg Palkot and Greg Burke. CNN/U.S. will simulcast CNN International’s broadcast. Submit early morning coverage notes via the tip box…

> Plus: Pope John Paul II was “newsy,” NBC’s Stephen Weeke recalls

> Update: Inside Cable News liveblogged a bit of the coverage. “Fox is calling it ‘The Papal Conclave;’ CNN dubs it ‘The Next Pope;’ MSNBC goes with ‘Mass for the Papal Election.’”

Pope: MRC’s Analysis Of Papal

The Media Research Center offers its interpretation of how the media covered the life and death of Pope John Paul II. The positive coverage of his passing “did not match the usual pattern of papal coverage over the decades of his pontificate,” they write, and list many examples.

The report also says that, over the years, “reporters often chose sides in what one called the battle between ‘tolerance and absolutism.’ In their passion for that fight, ‘tolerance’ gained the majority of the time, and ‘absolutism’ received the majority of the grief.” More…

Pope Funeral: Where Were The Viewers?

Joann wonders via e-mail: “I kept hearing estimates that the Pope’s funeral attracted about 2 Billion people worldwide, and that it garnered the most viewers in all of TV history. If true, then the estimate of only 9 million who watched here in the U.S. is pretty paltry. It sounds like most Americans were pretty interested in watching the events of last week, but didn’t feel like getting up in the middle of the night, or early in the morning, to watch this most historic event. I am actually pretty surprised at that low turnout, as I thought people seemed so obsessed with everything related to the Pope and his death.”

Pope: The Rome To NYC Shuttle

TV Week describes the “exodus” of U.S.-based anchors and correspondents from Rome: “Plans called for ‘NBC Nightly News’ anchor Brian Williams-the only flagship newscast anchor representing the Big 3 broadcast networks-to head home. Same for Charlie Gibson, who had been in Rome all week for both ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’ and ‘World News Tonight;’ Fox News Channel’s Shepard Smith; MSNBC’s ‘Hardball’ host Chris Matthews; and Harry Smith, who had been in Rome all week for ‘The Early Show’ on CBS. ‘Today’s’ Katie Couric was to relieve her co-host Matt Lauer from duty in St. Peter’s Square.” Many of them will be back on April 18…

Pope: O’Reilly Disses Cable Commentary

“It’s too bad the cable TV news coverage of the Pope’s death has desensitized some Americans,” Bill O’Reilly writes in his weekly newspaper column. “The wall-to-wall commentary quickly became tiresome to many, and millions tuned out. That’s a shame, because Pope John Paul’s life is very much worth examining.” More…

Pope: Covering The College of Cardinals

For the media, now comes the hard part: Covering the Sacred College of Cardinals. Thomas Reese, worked with CNN during its coverage of John Paul’s funeral, tells Newsday that “the Vatican loves the media when they cover the show.” But: “It doesn’t love the media when they start coming backstage to find out how the next show is being put together.” He says the American cardinals will “go along with the silence agreement,” but the other cardinals “will continue to speak on background to their favorite reporters.”

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>