Back in March we reported on Twitter’s buyout of popular blogging platform Posterous – the move was an “acquihire” from Twitter, who announced that “Posterous engineers, product managers and others will join our teams working on several key initiatives that will make Twitter even better”.

Twitter also told users who would like to back up their content or move their posts to another service that “clear instructions for doing so” would be provided “in the coming weeks”.

Well, eight months later, you can now finally export your Posterous content to somewhere else. And we really recommend that you do.

Why? Twitter has all but ignored Posterous since the acquisition, even letting the site’s online security certificate expire by accident a couple of months ago. The Posterous blog, once a thriving hotbed of information, hasn’t updated since the buyout (until yesterday), and the Posterous Twitter account now only shares information about outages, which have become increasingly problematic.

To be fair, this was always a talent purchase, and that was made clear from the start, but it’s been handled pretty poorly by Twitter. Posterous still has a number of devoted users and it seems dramatically unfair to force them to wait so long before giving them the (official, non third-party) option to move their blog to another host, such as Tumblr.

If you’re ready to make the move, just follow the instructions on the Posterous blog, which we’ve repeated for convenience below.

How To Export Your Posterous Blog

1. Go to http://posterous.com/#backup
2. Click to request a backup of your Space by clicking “Request Backup” next to your Space name
3. When your backup is available, you’ll receive an email
4. Return to http://posterous.com/#backup to download a zip file

There’s been no announcement from Twitter that they plan to close Posterous down completely, but it seems highly unlikely that the service will still be here this time next year, so if you’re an active Posterous blogger and want to protect your content, we recommend making the move to another service as soon as possible.

(Source: Posterous.)