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CNN

CNN Worldwide is a portfolio of two dozen news and information services across cable, satellite, radio, wireless devices and the Internet in more than 200 countries and territories worldwide. CNN is division of Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., a Time Warner Company. The 24-hour cable news channel was founded in 1980 by American media proprietor Ted Turner. CNN broadcasts from its headquarters at the CNN Center in Atlanta, the Time Warner Center in New York City, and studios in Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles. CNN is available in 98 million U.S. households, and more than 271 million worldwide. Jeff Zucker is the president of CNN Worldwide.

CNN’s Martin Savidge Goes From Flight Simulator to Submarine

The search for missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 continued in the Indian Ocean this week. With an unmanned U.S. Navy submarine joining the search this week, CNN’s Martin Savidge switched his focus from the air search to the underwater search, reporting live from inside a submarine 50 feet below the water’s surface in Canada. Watch:

The company that CNN used for the flight simulator reports, uFly, fired the instructor assigned to Savidge this week, saying he ““shamed Canadians” with the way he dressed during his television appearances.

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Canadian Company Fires Flight Instructor Who Appeared Frequently on CNN

CNN flight simulatoruFly, a Canadian flight simulator company, has fired one of its employees who appeared frequently on CNN during the network’s coverage of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. The company said the employee, Mitchell Casado, “shamed Canadians” with the way he dressed during his television appearances, the Associated Press reports:

uFly company owner Claudio Teixeira said he fired Mitchell Casado on Wednesday in part for refusing to dress professionally and making Canadians “look very bad all over the world.”

Casado’s relaxed style of jeans and plaid shirts attracted wide attention during CNN’s constant coverage of the search for the missing flight. CNN’s Martin Savidge and Casado logged many hours reporting from the fake cockpit located at the company’s office in near the Toronto airport, which has a simulator that is the same model of the lost plane.

[...] Teixeira says he received many email complaints about the instructor’s way of dressing during the time he appeared on CNN. “Even though I let him be on TV he shamed us Canadians and shamed my company with the way he was dressing like he was 15 years old,” he said. “People were complaining that it wasn’t professional at all … If you go to any plane you don’t see them in shorts and sandals.”

Profiling: Gutfeld, Hasselbeck, Kohn

  • Greg Gutfeld continues his Not Cool book tour, promoting his new book. The Pensacola News Journal caught up with Gutfeld in North Florida: “Stationed in the children’s section of the bookstore, he wisecracked with young and old alike, even threatening to call child protective services on one young mother, though still drawing a laugh.”

  • Elisabeth Hasselbeck is featured in Ladies Home Journal. On leaving “The View” for “Fox & Friends,” Hasselbeck says, “It was like going from hanging out with your sisters to playing catch with your brothers. I don’t think I am or will ever be the best at what I do but I try really hard.”

  • CNN contributor Sally Kohn–previously a Fox News contributor–writes for The Christian Science Monitor about her experience as a “liberal talking head on Fox News.” “It was a turning point for me to meet people such as Mr. Hannity, Karl Rove, Monica Crowley, Sarah Palin, and so many others,” Kohn writes. “Though we certainly disagree profoundly on political issues – they’re personable and kind and human. Just like me.”

Robin Roberts, Rachel Maddow, Anderson Cooper on the OUT Power 50

OUT50Several TV news anchors and hosts have made this year’s OUT Power 50 list. It’s the brand’s annual ranking of the most influential LGBT voices in American culture. ABC’s Robin Roberts, who publicly came out late last year, is the first woman of color in the top 10. Here are some TV notables:

35. Suze Orman
27. Don Lemon
14. Anderson Cooper
10. Robin Roberts
3. Rachel Maddow

Ellen DeGeneres, who was number 2 last year, returned to the top spot on the list. Also on the list Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Glenn Greenwald at #5, Bravo’s Andy Cohen at #8, and Gawker CEO Nick Denton at #45.

(Image via OUT)

Barbara Walters to Don Lemon: CNN Wouldn’t Do Nonstop MH370 Coverage If Not for Ratings

WaltersWhile sitting in as a co-host on “The View” today, CNN’s Don Lemon fielded an onslaught of questions from the chat show’s ladies about his network’s nonstop coverage of missing Malaysia Flight 370.

“You’ve covered this more than any other story that I can remember,” Barbara Walters said. “CNN would not do this if it were not for the ratings.”

“Well, I don’t know if we would do it just for the ratings; we do a lot of things that don’t rate well, but we still do it,” Lemon responded, adding that CNN is giving the audience what it wants.

Co-host Jenny McCarthy asked how Lemon finds the words to continue talking about the missing airliner, day after day. Lemon tipped his hat to a great group of CNN aviation experts. “I rely on them, I don’t pretend that I’m an expert,” he said.

“We [CNN] may not have taken the plane, but we might certainly find it,” Lemon concluded.

Lemon’s colleagues, Anderson Cooper, Erin Burnett, and Wolf Blitzer echoed his sentiments while speaking to TVNewser last week. Cooper conceded the network has covered the story a lot, but called it a very “human” story involving “239 souls.” Burnett pointed to security concerns the story raises, while Blitzer raised the still-unknown question of whether criminal activity or mechanical failure was the reason behind the plane’s disappearance.

A Fulltime Job and Twins, CNN’s Kyra Phillips Now Adds a Podcast to Her Routine

MomSquadIncreasingly, TV news anchors and hosts are going extra-curricular as they expand their “brand.” A few years ago, former CBS “Early Show” and local TV anchor Rene Syler launched parenting site Good Enough Mother while still continuing TV appearances. When she left CNN, Soledad O’Brien started her own production company and can now be seen on CNN, Al Jazeera America and other outlets. Then there are the TV news anchors who do double duty on radio, FNC’s Brian Kilmeade among them.

CNN anchor Kyra Phillips is getting into the multi-tasking fray. Phillips and two friends started “The Mom Squad Show,” a 3-times-a-week podcast which, in its first week on iTunes, was downloaded 7,000 times. The podcast is hosted by Phillips in Atlanta, and fellow moms Christine Eads in Washington, DC and Chaz Kelly in Connecticut. Kelly’s husband “Seton” O’Connor is a sidekick on the Dan Patrick show. Eads co-hosts a show on SiriusXM.

Phillips will continue her day job in the CNN Investigative unit, while recording the podcast in her off hours. She’s not allowed to pitch products, or otherwise overstep her CNN contract. Phillips and her husband, Fox News Atlanta-based correspondent John Roberts, are the parents of 3-year-old twins.

“The Mom Squad Show” already has distribution. It went live on iHeardRadio today, and will soon be carried on TuneIn.

All the Media News, That’s Fit To Air

FNCMBCNNRS

While the three evening newscasts and the network morning shows often look the same — with the same lineup of stories, often airing at the same time — the two media criticism shows, provide two distinct options for news junkies: those who are partial to Fox News and those who tune in to CNN.

Both shows, CNN’s “Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter” and FNC’s “MediaBuzz with Howard Kurtz,” air at the same time, 11amET Sundays. (“MediaBuzz” also gets a re-air at 5pmET)

Yesterday, “Reliable Sources” led with the Stephen Colbert taking over CBS’s “Late Show.” “MediaBuzz” led with how the media covered the departure of HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. Kurtz got to Colbert :47 minutes into his show. “Reliable Sources” didn’t cover Sebelius at all.

On CNN, Stelter had a 10-minute segment, which included an interview with Sen. Al Franken, on the proposed Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger. Kurtz didn’t cover last week’s merger news, but had two segments with former CBS News reporter Sharyl Attkisson, who was also on Bill O’Reilly‘s show earlier in the week.

Stelter reported last week’s news of a new ABC News president, Kurtz did not. Kurtz discussed the coverage of Jeb Bush last week, Stelter did not. Both shows gladly covered competitor MSNBC, and the reports that host Al Sharpton was once an FBI informant.

While no one will ever confuse CNN and Fox News, the two programs that cover the media are leading the way in differentiation.

‘SNL’ Lampoons CNN Alerts, Al Sharpton

CNNPregnancySNLLast Saturday night, “Fox & Friends” got another send-up on “Saturday Night Live.” Last night CNN’s breaking news alerts and MSNBC host Al Sharpton got the SNL treatment.

The CNN Pregnancy Test gives a hopeful couple an alert on everything but whether they’re having a baby. “The CNN take-home pregnancy test… for when you want to know, when they don’t know.”

In another skit, “Undercover Sharpton” imagines the Rev. Al Sharpton as an undercover FBI informant. Both clips after the jump…

Read more

Erin Burnett: Miles O’Brien is ‘Inspirational’

MilesErinCNNErin Burnett recently choked up while interviewing new CNN colleague Miles O’Brien; moved by his account of bouncing back mentally after losing part of his arm during a freak accident reporting in the Philippines.

“I think Miles is inspirational,” Burnett told TVNewser earlier this week at CNN’s upfront presentation.

“And you really can’t imagine how you would be able, after a few weeks, to be up, and out, and positive, and motivated,” she continued, adding that she was touched O’Brien cited his work as the inspiration to stay positive, even while dealing with pain.

“He’s been doing it despite the physical pain he’s in. Miles still feels pain in his arm where he doesn’t have arm, and he’s working until midnight every night…it’s incredible that he’s able to do that. It puts life in perspective.”

After being signed as an aviation expert by CNN after the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 story broke, O’Brien, who is a licensed pilot, and spent 16 years with CNN, has been contributing on a daily basis during the network’s near nonstop coverage of the missing airliner.

CNN Anchors Defend Missing Malaysia Airlines Coverage

Some of CNN’s top anchors are defending the network’s decision to produce near non-stop coverage of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 for the last month.

“I know it’s received a fair amount of criticism from some folks, and I understand that… it’s a lot of coverage,” Anderson Cooper told TVNewser after the network’s upfront presentation yesterday. At the same time, he said, the story is resonating with viewers because it’s a very “human” story. “We’re talking about 239 souls on board, and their families.”

Wolf Blitzer agrees. “Look, 239 people are missing, they’ve been missing now for several weeks,” Blitzer told us, adding that a $250 million, American-made Boeing 777 simply vanishing is an intriguing mystery. “We don’t know if it’s because of criminal activity, or mechanical failure.” Blitzer has produced strong ratings anchoring a full-hour of “The Situation Room” at 6pmET pre-empting “Crossfire.”

Erin Burnett acknowledged the network has had internal discussions about the amount of coverage. “I’m not going to deny we haven’t,” she said, adding that ultimately, this story is a mystery that brings to light other issues in the post-9/11 era.

“You can’t lose an iPhone, but you can lose a plane,” she wondered. “It’s a security story. It’s a safety story. It’s a personal story, and it’s a mystery.”

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