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Twitter Etiquette

Why Thanking Someone For A Retweet Might Actually Be A Good Idea After All

Why Thanking Someone For A Retweet Might Actually Be A Good Idea After All

Do you say “thank you” when you get a retweet?

It’s typically frowned upon by Twitter etiquette hawks, whose reasons for despising vary from “it clutters up your profile,” to “it’s just plain unproductive.”

But it’s time to reassess this stance, and – quite possibly – incorporate thank yous back in to your Twitter repertoire. Here’s why.

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3 Situations That Prove A Twitter Rant Isn’t Always A Bad Thing

rant on twitter

There’s no physical rulebook that you can pick up and browse through for Twitter etiquette, but you’ve no doubt encountered a few (or a lot) who think they own a copy. They’re those people who say “you HAVE to follow fewer people than are following you,” and “you should NEVER thank anyone for a retweet.” Well, those people might have their rules, and they might work for them. But if you’re interested in breaking a few rules, we’ve got three situations where a Twitter rant – usually seen as a big “no-no” – can actually be a good thing.
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Jose Canseco Tests Privacy Limits; Tweets Alleged Rape Victim’s Name And Photo

There are few rules one must follow to stay in Twitter’s good graces and they mostly revolve around spam (don’t do it). Beyond that, anything goes really. You can tweet whatever you want – it’s a freedom of speech wasteland – just DON’T share someone’s personal information without their permission.

Unless you’re Jose Canseco, that is. He can share the name and photo of his alleged rape victim with impunity.

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How TrueTwit Helps You Help It Make Money – And Waste A Ton Of Time

If you’ve spent any amount of time on Twitter, you’ve likely received a TrueTwit validation direct message. It says something like “Nelly Nameless uses TrueTwit validation service. Please validate your account.”

If you think this practice is okay, you need a Twitter direct message refresher. And when you’re done reading THAT, we’ll tell you why this “harmless annoyance” (aka TrueTwit) is anything but.

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Tweetblocking Is The New Junkpunch

If you ever want to send a solid “eff you” to someone on Twitter you have a few options, depending on the amount of time you want to invest. From the most time-consuming to the least: You can create a troll account and harass them; send #subtweets directed at them and ignore their replies; or you can block them.

This last one might seem like a pointless action as it’s so simple to get around, but it’s actually not only the most time-friendly course to take, but it’s also the ultimate junkpunch because it stops them dead in their tracks. (Unless they’re crazy stalkers, then it probably just makes them angry enough to find you ‘in real life.’)

Here’s why:

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Class President Suspended For Tweet Criticizing High School Football Team

Thank goodness Twitter didn’t exist when you were in high school, hmm? If you’ve ever said or thought that, you’ll appreciate the COMPLETE ridiculousness of this story.

A class president at a high school in Kansas said something negative about his school’s football team and got suspended for the remainder of the year.

He didn’t swear. He didn’t threaten anyone. The tweet wasn’t violent. But it made other kids angry. Yeah, that’s really all it took. This is going on the Twit List, definitely.

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People Are Live-Tweeting Everything, Including Births – Are There No Limits?

How many times each day do you see something on social media that makes me marvel at people’s lack of personal boundaries? Pretty often, we’re guessing.

One way folks feed into this ‘too much info’ (TMI) mentality is through live-tweeting.

Yes, live-tweeting can be great for breaking news and such, but do we want to read live tweets from someone pushing out a baby? If you’ve ever heard someone recount even a bit of the birthing process, the answer is a resounding NO. But someone did it. And we’re guessing that’s only the tip of this TMI iceberg.

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Is Piggybacking On Breaking News To Promote Your Business Ever Okay? Yep.

We mentioned before that piggybacking on trending tragedies to promote a business was ill-advised, but what about other human interest-style breaking news? If the story has a happy ending (but still a fantastically horrible beginning and middle) does that change things? Is it ever a good idea to promote your business on the back of others’ pain?

The answer is clearly no, right? Well, we have some extentuating circumstances to present for your consideration that may change your mind. Let’s see if you agree.

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Is “Tweet & Delete” A Viable Twitter Strategy?

During President Obama’s State of the Union address in February, Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) was observed by the media sending questionable tweets, then deleting them from his Twitter profile.

PR Daily dove into Cohen’s reasoning behind his tweet and delete “strategy,” if it can be called that.

But the bigger question is whether or not this tweeting and deleting thing is a new, viable way to approach Twitter.

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Hot Twitter Topic: Revising Tweets

If you followed the Boston Marathon news last week on Twitter, you likely read lots of false information.

Many users tweeted the name of one “suspect” who wasn’t and there were endless “this is happening now!” assertions about events that (again) weren’t, from folks listening to scanners.

As a result, there a few red faces this week, embarrassed they tweeted such things – and kind of angry, it seems, at Twitter.

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