The big news: Twitter just released a report that details (somewhat) where requests for user info and copyright takedown notices come from.

The funny news: One of the complaints linked to the report is from Square, which is Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey’s new company.

Twitter just released its first Transparency Report, which will focus on sharing:

  • government requests received for user information,
  • government requests received to withhold content, and
  • DMCA takedown notices received from copyright holders.

And here’s some interesting info to check out. It dates back to January 1, 2012. You’ll note that the report shows whether or not Twitter took action on these requests. And you’ll also note that most of the requests come from the U.S. – a staggering amount really, when compared to other countries:

If you look at Google’s Transparency Report detailing user data requests, the U.S. is at the tipity top there as well. Yikes.

Twitter’s goal is to help keep everyone informed and make folks more accountable for their info. In light of today’s ruling, this report is a timely and important reminder that we should all understand (and fear) our lack of online privacy a bit more. As they note in their blog post, Twitter has “received more government requests in the first half of 2012 . . . than in the entirety of 2011.” And it will only get worse.

But now for some lighter news.

In this same post, Twitter links to DMCA takedown notices and requests to withhold content and one of these notices is from Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey’s newest start-up, Square. No, that’s not the funny part. Here’s the part of the complaint that we think you’ll enjoy (bold ours):

Description of infringement: The reported account is using Square, Inc.’s copyright protected logo/image as their profile picture. Additionally, the reported account is using the infringing username SquareRegister, which infringes upon Square, Inc.’s trademark rights in the registered SQUARE trademark. We have previously attempted to have this account transferred to our client by sending multiple trademark claim violation forms, but were unable to communicate with a representative of Twitter regarding this matter to achieve transfer of this account.

Ha. Good luck to the rest of us then, hmm? If they can’t get in touch with Twitter, who can?

(Oh my image from Shutterstock)