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Donya Blaze

How to Get a Job in Book Publishing

For the countless number of books published each year, there are only a few that become true breakout successes, selling millions upon millions of copies, hijacking the bestsellers lists and becoming permanently etched in American pop culture.

While great storytelling is at least partly responsible for their success, there is also an expansive team behind the scenes, working diligently to ensure that every plot twist is meticulously crafted, that the cover is so well-designed that readers drop $25 for the hardcover without blinking, and that those same characters will hopefully transcend the pages and end up on the big screen.

Think you’ve got what it takes to make it at one of the Big Six publishers? Learn how to break into the industry in How To Get a Job in Book Publishing.

Sherry Yuan

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Tina Brown Urges Women to “Lean ON” Companies to Do Better

Women in the World 2013

 

At Newsweek Daily Beast’s fourth annual Women in the World Summit, Tina Brown said the glass ceiling is a “luxury” compared to the atrocities women in the rest of the world face, like the honor killings in Pakistan and the tens of thousands of rapes in Syria.

In her opening remarks Thursday at New York’s Lincoln Center, Brown gave credit to Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg for “starting the conversation” about the lack of female leaders in business with her buzzed-about book Lean In. However, she stressed, there is still much work to be done.

Tina Brown“Leaning in can only be a part of the strategy. Leaning in works only in places where women are close enough to reach their rightful goals,” said Brown.

“Our mission at this summit isn’t just to lean in, but to lean ON — lean ON corporations to change the pitiful representation of women in board rooms, lean ON prosecutors to commit to end rampant sexual violence, lean ON the courts in Latin America to put an end to punitive violence against women, lean ON the pimps who sell girls for sex and the johns who buy them, lean ON the clerks of all religions who condone or turn a blind eye to the abuse of women and deny their fundamental rights, lean ON brothers who murder their sisters in so-called honor killings, lean ON entire governments to safeguard the rights and well-being and free up the economic potential of all their citizens. Lean ON.”

See more photos from the event on FishbowlNY and watch a live stream of Day 2 here.

Elle‘s Joe Zee Reveals Exactly What a Magazine Creative Director Does


As creative director for Elle, Joe Zee describes his as an “interesting, sort of nebulous title.”

“I work with all the visuals from cover to cover, so when you read the magazine, whether it’s the model, the celebrity, the styling, the fashion, the photography, all those things come into my play,” Zee explained in our Media Beat interview. “It’s really sort of helping to define a visual signature for the magazine.”

And @mrjoezee gets pummeled with questions daily from women trying to mimic the seemingly effortless style of their favorite celebs. The number one question he gets? No, not that white pants after Labor Day thing — seriously, are we still discussing that?

“I think the biggest question I get all the time is people want my job. How do I do what you do?” said Zee. “I love my job, and it definitely is glamorous after all these years. But there was a lot of years of no glamour to get to that point.”

Part 1: Elle’s Joe Zee Puts It All on the Line for Sundance Channel
Part 3: How Elle’s Joe Zee Broke Into Fashion (and How You Can Too)

LeVar Burton on Finding Career Success: ‘You’ve gotta make it happen’

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Want to achieve longevity in your career? Look no further than LeVar Burton. The actor has starred in three iconic TV shows (Roots, Star Trek The Next Generation and Reading Rainbow, in case you’re wondering), directed films, written books, and he recently dove head-first into Silicon Valley by releasing the Reading Rainbow app.

So, how has he managed to re-invent his career so many times? By being a “self-starter,” he says.

“I found early on in my acting career that I didn’t do well just sitting around and waiting around for the phone to ring, for somebody to give me a job,” Burton explained in our Media Beat interview. “I’ve always been out there more pro-active than anybody else on my own behalf, because I just know that you’ve gotta make it happen. Nobody’s gonna make it happen for you.”

Part 1: LeVar Burton on Bringing the ‘Reading Rainbow’ App to Silicon Valley
Part 2: LeVar Burton on the Future of Reading Rainbow & Printed Books

Lucky‘s Brandon Holley on the Key to Moving Up: ‘Steady Input Without Being Annoying’

Brandon Holley held editor positions at Time Out and GQ, helped launch Elle Girl and headed Yahoo! Shine before taking the helm at Lucky in 2011. And, she says, if you want to snag a top spot on a magazine masthead, you need to be a vocal and proactive voice for the brand.

“I think people make a mistake when they wanna climb the masthead, and they assume the editor-in-chief should pay attention to them. And, now that I’m on the other side of the desk, I love people who come to me,” Holley said in our Media Beat interview.

Holley explained that she made a name for herself at GQ by giving “steady input without being annoying” to editor-in-chief Art Cooper. “I wasn’t kissing ass, but I would write memos to him and say, ‘I think this section could use this,’ and ‘I think we should start a new section that’s this’… I’m a huge fan of memo writing.”

Part 2: Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’
Part 3: Lucky‘s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

7 Keys To Becoming Editor-In-Chief

So, you wanna be EIC, huh? Depending on the size of the publication and the stability of the market — which, let’s face it, has not been that kind to print publications lately — the magazine masthead is not the playground of overnight sensations. You can, however, climb the editorial ladder with a little strategy and lots of hard work. For example…

Sign up for the un-spectacular.

You know those grunt assignments that nobody else wants? Take ‘em. They’re like little learning boot camps, said Marie Claire features director Lea Goldman, who found unique value in a notoriously tedious task.

“When I started out, transcripts and fact checking were the most useful things I did because they taught me how to put together a story,” she remembered. “I often just copied the source with the head of an organization and add that name and number to my Rolodex like, ‘OK, that’s a source. Now, I know if I’m ever working on a story like this, I can call that person.’ So they’re very useful and they shouldn’t be dismissed as just scut work.”

To find out how other magazine veterans got promoted, read How To Become an Editor-in-Chief.

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Get Some Freelance Clips at Family Circle

The best way to position yourself for a full-time editorial job is to start freelancing for your dream publication first. And if your niche is parenting (specifically for teenagers and tweens), you might be able to earn a byline at Family Circle.

Just make sure your pitch outlines concrete tips for the health and well-being of readers’ families. ”We offer essential advice for tough parenting challenges, fun suggestions for family activities, healthy and delicious recipes, and DIY projects to create a comfortable home,” said senior associate editor Stephanie Emma Pfeffer.

If you’re bursting with ideas in any of those topics, you’re in luck. FC relies on freelancers for about 60 percent of its content.

Get more guidelines in How To Pitch: Family Circle.

ag_logo_medium.gif This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Jonathan Murray Tells How To Get a Reality TV Job

As creator of The Real World and Road Rules and producer of Keeping Up With The Kardashians and Project Runway, Jonathan Murray gets asked one question an awful lot:

How do I get a job in reality TV?

In mediabistro.com’s latest So What Do You Do? interview, Murray said it’s all about getting that first gig — any gig — in the business.

“I think we hire 20 to 30 young people each year to start out as PAs and loggers and all these different entry-level jobs. And I always tell them that you really need to work in it to understand it. Get a good liberal arts education,” he explained. “I’m always looking for people who think well, who are curious, who can write well, who are well-read, who understand story, and then we can teach them most of the rest of the stuff as a company.”

Murray also discussed how he was able to get MTV to take a chance on the genre and whether Kim Kardashian‘s 72-day marriage was really a sham for the cameras. Read the full interview.

Mikki Taylor Reveals Why She Left Essence

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Mikki Taylor spent over 30 years at Essence, first in the mag’s fashion and sewing department in the early 80s and most recently as its cover and style director. You’d think leaving such a prestigious job for the uncertainty of entrepreneurship would come with some trepidation, but Taylor says stepping down to an editor-at-large position just felt right.

“I think for about 60 seconds I had the fear that ‘what if Mikki Taylor doesn’t make it with Mikki Taylor Enterprises?’” the style and beauty expert explained in our Media Beat interview. “Well, what if this doesn’t work? Then, I’ll do something else, because I’m always going to find myself in the place of empowering women. And I know too much to stop now.”

Watch the full video for more of Taylor’s tips on climbing a magazine masthead.

Part 1: Mikki Taylor on Her 30 Years at Essence
Part 2: Essence‘s Mikki Taylor Takes on Casual Fridays

Essence‘s Mikki Taylor Takes on Casual Fridays

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In her new book Commander in ChicEssence editor-at-large Mikki Taylor doles out fashion and beauty tips for the everyday woman based on examples from Michelle Obama.

“I love her clear cut assurance, the way she owns her style from within,” she explained in our Media Beat interview.

And one thing FLOTUS has done, according to Taylor, is inject a much needed sophistication into America’s dress code. Casual Fridays? No, thank you, she says.

“I think that we’re a little too relaxed. I think a relaxed nation creates other kinds of flexibilities that shouldn’t exist. Let’s treat each other with the respect and the honor that we are due, and so the subliminal things play into that. If we’re coming to work in sneakers, if we’re coming to work in ripped jeans and plaid shirts, who are we representing?”

Part 1:Mikki Taylor on Her 30 Years at Essence
Part 3: Mikki Taylor Reveals Why She Left Essence

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