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Former Alaskan TV Reporter Battles Subpoena

extra extraRemember that TV reporter in Alaska who quit on-air and dropped the F-bomb, only to reveal she supports pot legalization? This was a huge conflict of interest based on her story as she owns a medical marijuana business.

According to the Associated Press, the Alaska Public Offices Commission wants to find out if Charlo Greene leveraged crowdsourcing dollars in order to bolster a ballot initiative focusing on legalizing pot use. Read more

Critical Questions to Ask About Benefit Enrollment

docIt’s that time of year again! If your employer distributed updates about your benefits plan for the upcoming calendar year, you’re not alone. And if you haven’t gotten anything yet, chances are you will.

Although it may not necessarily be the most exciting topic to talk about, it’s definitely an important one. NPR outlined several questions to explore while determining whether or not to stay on your current plan. Read more

Job Applicant Stabs Potential Boss During Interview

CommunityJournalismBLogFIWe cringed when we first heard about this story. What is this world coming to?

Jose Lopez apparently showed up to a job interview yesterday. Check that — he showed up drunk. The business owner smelled alcohol on his breath and you can guess what happened next.

The boss did what any hiring manager should do — he confronted Lopez about it. According to NBC San Diego, the job seeker got angry and then he started to get physical. A fight ensued and the boss ended up putting the suspect into a headlock! Read more

Facebook at Work Set to Launch in January

fb logoAccording to The Financial Times, Facebook is gearing up to introduce a new product in January allowing users to chat with colleagues, connect with professionals and collaborate.

It sounds like it’s going to look very similar like the Facebook as we know it today with its groups and constant newsfeed. And while it sounds like it’s set to compete with LinkedIn, Microsoft Office and Google Drive, it’s going to look slightly different from Mark Zuckerberg’s site. That’s because holiday photos and random videos from personal profiles can be separated from a user’s work identity. Read more

Good Labor News! Employees Gain Confidence to Quit Jobs

jobsWe feel a little funny writing this but what the heck — good news!

Americans are quitting their jobs fast and furiously. Turnover is increasing.

Actually, as it turns out this is fantastic news for the economy. In fact, we’re quitting our jobs at the fastest pace since early 2008! Read more

New Dating App Blocks Co-Workers From Viewing Your Profile

rosesIf you’ve ever logged onto Tinder and cringed at the thought of a co-worker seeing you on it, this new app will remedy the situation.

According to The New York Post, a new dating app called The League allows users to log in with their LinkedIn information. Then the app hides profiles from your business contacts and co-workers.

Former Google employee Amanda Bradford says in the piece, “The office doesn’t have to know you’re on the prowl.” Read more

AOL Lays Off Staffers; Impacts Money Department

CommunityJournalismBLogFIWe received an email this afternoon from an AOL insider with the subject line: “AOL lays off Money department.”

We followed up with the source as well as called AOL to obtain details such as how many people this impacts.

Here’s basic information of what we know: apparently editors of Daily Finance and Real Estate were laid off today. They were given a short amount of time clean out their desks.

The fate of contributors is unclear at the moment but as per the source, “top editors” were let go along with the coordinator of the contributors.

Stay tuned as we gather more information…

 

Three Ways to Stand Out During a Job Interview

interviewWant to truly shine during a job interview? Sure, there are always basic reminders like arriving on time and looking incredibly polished, but if you want to go above and beyond to stand out from other candidates, try flexing your interview muscles with these three tips.

1. Ask for an office tour. Go ahead and ask to peruse the hallowed halls of cubicle nation. Express your interest in the company and don’t be shy in asking to take a stroll. We’re not talking five mile walks around the corridors, mind you. Instead, take a few minutes with your interviewer to see where he or she sits. The motive, you see, is to check out the corporate culture.

If you happen to be interviewing at the end of the day, say close to 6 p.m., see if everyone looks like they’re still grinding out work at their desks. Or, maybe they’ve left for the day.

On another note, is the office loud or quiet? Does it seem to be buzzing with creativity or is everyone pigeonholed at their desks? You can learn a lot about the company’s culture by observing. Read more

Majority of Job Seekers Say They Can Outperform Their Boss

Turnober-Intern-Post-FISo, you think you have what it takes to run the ship? An overwhelming majority of employees confidently believe they can do a better job than their current manager.

Monster conducted a survey and asked visitors to their site, “In your current or most recent job, do you think you could do a better job than your manager?”

Over 4,800 responses were tallied and 84 percent of global respondents indicated yes, they can absolutely outperform their boss. While Europeans were most conservative with their answers, the vast majority firmly believed they possess the skills and experience to rise through the ranks. Read more

New Survey Shows Part-Time Workers Struggle to Find Full-Time Jobs

job searchAccording to a new CareerBuilder survey, although the unemployment rate continues to drop for full-time workers, part-time workers are still struggling to land jobs.

Per the survey, 32 percent of part-time workers indicated they want to work full-time but they haven’t been able to secure new gigs. One-fourth of part-time workers currently juggle two or more jobs to piece payments together.

The survey was conducted from August until early September and included 301 part-time workers across the country by representing various industries and company sizes. Read more

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