For the creative writer who enjoys writing lifestyle content or dreams of publishing her first novel, delving into the world of technical writing might seem, well, not so fun. However, writer Amanda Layman Low says that a technical writing position is not the “facepalm-migraine it sounds like” and recommends it as a lucrative career option for any writer.

In the past year, Layman Low dipped her toe into the field and eventually landed a full-time gig as a technical writer for a sales consulting company. Basically, she writes eLearning course material that teaches sales representatives how to sell software. Although it might sound dull, she says, there are plenty of reasons to jump on board, especially given the changing landscape of journalism. Unlike that uncertainty, “technical writing isn’t going anywhere,” said Layman Low. You have the security of knowing that companies will always be looking for writers of content for training, presentations and other corporate materials.

And the higher-than-average money she earns as a technical writer versus writing for other markets doesn’t hurt either. Layman Low says:

Do I think it’s fair that technical writers get paid more than some journalists and novelists? No. I don’t think technical or sales writing is intrinsically “worth” more than beautiful prose. But I won’t deny that the income eases a ton of the stressors of my past life.

For more on the advantages of a career as a technical writer, read: The Case for Breaking Into Technical Writing.

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